Quantcast

Youth unemployment is as high as it was in the early 1980’s. Do you think kids today have a harder time finding jobs than their parents did at their age?

Fox Report with Shepard Smith 2012/07/26 15:32:50
You!
Add Photos & Videos
Add a comment above

Top Opinion

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • De Sandy Beach 2012/10/16 20:07:04
    No
    De Sandy Beach
    +1
    no,if you try hard enough you will find something.
  • RLUX De Sand... 2012/10/16 20:15:28
    RLUX
    TRUE
  • lancealdenmorgan 2012/09/27 02:54:16
    No
    lancealdenmorgan
    in the 80's there was an abundance of jobs now jobs that would be filled by teens their parents work because extra money for dependents is not as important as keeping a roof over their heads our job creators are not thinking about us certainly not our kids
  • TerryPCawley 2012/09/25 19:06:19
    About the same
    TerryPCawley
    I believe that we are at that point again. I graduated from college in 1982 when it was at the time the worst year ever to graduate from college. It is up to people in my generation to help this one help themselves. I myself have been trying to mentor them through various channels to stimulate the economy and take advantage of every opportunity to create jobs and rebuild communities everywhere.
  • RTHTGakaRoland 2012/08/13 23:26:51
    Yes
    RTHTGakaRoland
    Welcome to Obama's Great Oppression.

    http://www.urbandictionary.co...

    "Obama Is The Dr. Kevorkian Of Job Creation"

    "Presidents actually don't create jobs, but their policies and programs can stand in the way of those who do. According to a chart produced using figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and compiled by the good folks at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, President Obama has made even former President Jimmy Carter look like Adam Smith.

    The chart shows the total job growth during the tenure of each president since 1945 and the ending unemployment rate.

    Dead last and the only president in negative territory is Barack Obama. Even Gerald Ford in his short, post-Watergate term created a net 2.1 million new jobs. Obama is listed at a minus 318,000."

    http://news.investors.com/art...
  • lanceal... RTHTGak... 2012/09/27 02:59:03
    lancealdenmorgan
    +2
    look at the stock market solid growth over the last 4 years constant job creation, and 25 million less foreclosed houses try pulling the right (wrong) wing out of your ear
  • RTHTGak... lanceal... 2012/09/27 03:42:40
    RTHTGakaRoland
    Stock market is actually on its way back down (three consecutive days down) and any increases have been inflation due to three rounds of QE.

    Foreclosures are only down due to banks already having more REOs than they can even put on the market without causing a secondary crash, which may be coming anyway.

    "Obama’s house of cards bad loans in the name of ‘diversity,’ Obama is creating the mortgage crisis all over again"

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/...

    By job growth and many other measures Obama's Great Oppression while technically a recovery is the worst case of economic malaise since adequate metrics have been recorded to compare "recoveries."

    "Obama Wins The Gold For Worst Economic Recovery Ever"

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/l...
  • lanceal... RTHTGak... 2012/09/27 03:50:32
    lancealdenmorgan
    It is still a recovery and not a greater depression you just can't admit to any of the Presidents successes because you don't see him as our president you only see what you want to look at to keep from seeing where and how your wrong. one nation indivisible. so REALLY WHERE DO YOU STAND!!!
  • RTHTGak... lanceal... 2012/09/27 04:03:23
  • lanceal... RTHTGak... 2012/09/27 04:15:48
    lancealdenmorgan
    Lame
  • RTHTGak... lanceal... 2012/09/27 07:14:25
    RTHTGakaRoland
    True

    make it worse obama
  • RezcrashGB 2012/08/01 15:36:58
    About the same
    RezcrashGB
    But in the U K ... its the first time the numbers
    have been over a million , so it's hard .
  • AmericanVirus 2012/08/01 14:14:48 (edited)
    Yes
    AmericanVirus
    Apply online to 500 stores, sit and wait.... maybe someone will pick you name out of the hat
  • lanceal... America... 2012/09/27 03:00:11
    lancealdenmorgan
    +2
    Just don't stop applying it worked for me
  • ChocolateThunder 2012/08/01 02:54:52
    Yes
    ChocolateThunder
    I know this will burst the bubble of some Conservatives, but sometimes college age kids are considered over qualified for jobs 'beneath' them.

    I suppose it's good for me, since there will be a shortage of doctors, especially ob-gyns... just got to avoid those damn lawsuits. *laugh
  • biggerman 2012/08/01 02:52:42
  • El Prez 2012/08/01 01:11:24
    Yes
    El Prez
    Too many older people, with experience, out of work and willing to take the jobs the young did before.
  • WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA 2012/08/01 00:23:08
    Yes
    WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA
    For everybody. When I was a teen I could submit an application and have a job, how times have changed.
  • Firedye 2012/07/31 21:36:08
    Yes
    Firedye
    My mom has told me about how when she was younger, she and her other five siblings put in applications to a movie theater, and were hired almost immediately afterward. I applied to a movie theater three times, Walmart twice, and about seven other places and heard nothing for the better half of a year.
  • dePSyChO 2012/07/31 21:31:47
    Yes
    dePSyChO
    Unfortunately, this doesn't seem to sink in to many parents today, because they expect it's just as easy - or easier.
  • J 2012/07/31 20:42:02
    Yes
    J
    I graduated in 79. I found a job right away - not the best job and not in the field I studies, but I found a job. My daughter, who graduated with honors from a private (a US News top 10) university. She wound up waiting tables for the first two years she got out of college, then lost the job that was supposed to be her "future". She is now out of, but looking for, work and knows she will have to go back to waiting tables until this economy turns around.
  • James 2012/07/31 20:20:40
    Yes
    James
    In my parent's time, you could literally get hired right off the street. Nowadays, you have to submit your "application" on their corporate website where often times it is never seen again.
  • leslie 2012/07/31 19:40:38
    No
    leslie
    I think Everyone is having a harder time finding employment....In many ways Kids today can get jobs faster than adults can because they are cheaper to employ. Trust me I have been looking for 2 months and had maybe 5 interviews out of 80 apps.... Still nothing. Yet all of the positions have been filled... In at least two cases that I know for a fact by younger thinner, prettier girls. So don't try to make the Late teens early twenties job market look so glum.
  • James leslie 2012/07/31 20:21:42
    James
    TImes were much easier when you were their age weren't they?
  • leslie James 2012/07/31 20:25:00
    leslie
    No, Employers did not look at age or physical appearance but rather at your skills and experience.
  • J leslie 2012/07/31 20:43:16
    J
    No, they have always looked at your outward appearance. It does make a difference most of the time.
  • leslie J 2012/08/01 07:07:56
    leslie
    It hasn't been my experience until just the last couple of years.
  • GiuliettaTomolei 2012/07/31 19:18:10
    Yes
    GiuliettaTomolei
    +2
    It seems in 99% of jobs, they want you to already have experience, but you can't get experience unless they hire you.
  • dekecds 2012/07/31 19:12:01
    No
    dekecds
    They are lazier and pickier about doing a job that's just not what they want to do. Grow up!
  • James dekecds 2012/07/31 20:24:24
  • J James 2012/07/31 20:51:15
    J
    +2
    While I deplore your language and don't totally agree with you. I must say that getting a job for recent graduates is much more difficult. My daughter lost her job. She waited tables going through college and will resort to doing it again. Restauranting and food service was not part of her degree plan. She is not giving up looking, but is praying that a capitalist will win the Presidency so that she can get back on the career path that she worked so hard for. (Aviation - thought you'd ask)

    While many are looking or willing to take what is available, there are a couple of young adults she graduated with who are themselves above waiting tables, working at McDonalds or JC Penneys, etc., and would rather live off the government. The friend of my niece graduated in May 2011. She "qualified" for disability - lower back disorder. She got her degree in pharmacology and wanted to work at a particular hospital. They haven't (probably won't) hired her, so she refuses to try to get a job somewhere else.
  • James J 2012/08/01 02:07:29
  • dekecds James 2012/08/01 04:04:28
    dekecds
    +1
    I agree that older people (late 40's and above maybe) have a tougher time these days finding a job, but the youth have no excuse, nor do the middle aged (25-48ish). There are ads for truckers that span pages in my local paper, yet no one is responding. Same for HSE workers and middle management (industrial safety inspectors and McD's shift managers) that pays above 35K per year. $200 and 10 hours of OSHA training buys the HSE position or a CDL. Responsibility and a history of non-theft will pretty much get you in the door at McD's.
    I attempted college for two years while working as a manager at McD's and Sonic at the ages of 18-20, back in 1998-2000, before I realized that a "BS-Architectural Engineering" degree would only waste my time and money for the first 10-15 years and I could earn more in the meantime by working my way up the food chain in a company by applying myself beyond my expected duties.
    Over the years I have been piecing together an online degree in Business Management with a focus on Project Management that I hope will eventually give me an edge for promotion when I approach "Top-Out" in my career.
    My next Job is offering 92K per year due to past experience, but I had to humble myself and do some basic labor in between jobs to maintain a career with minimal employment gaps.
  • James dekecds 2012/08/01 20:35:58
    James
    +1
    I understand your angle in this but consider putting the shoe on the other foot. If you owned a trucking company, would you trust a Ph.D to be driving a truck long distances for the next 10-15 years? I wouldn't either. The moment the economy picks up that Ph.D will abandon that job like the plague. So you have your freight owners and McDonald's managers who are hesitant to hire these people because exactly that. The moment things get good, their investment in these folks diminishes.
  • dekecds James 2012/08/02 00:03:35
    dekecds
    +1
    If that PhD. person has a CDL, send em' down here to Texas, because the fuel industry is sorely lacking truck drivers. These drivers average $30 / hour and they haul their loads about 60-100 miles away, so not exactly that far. Won't pay for that PhD's porsche, but it will buy food, gas, and mortgage until things get better! By the way, most freight haulers, fuel haulers, and delivery drivers don't have an increasing pay scale and there is no real investment made in their employment because the driver is responsible for his own training and certification. Very few companies offer paid training. You have a CDL and/or HAZMAT cert? You can drive my truck! That's it!
    My plant is limited to 1.2 million barrels of fuel hauled per day because of a lack of truckers and fuel loaders (that's what I am doing right now, loading). It is capable of 9 million per day and has the purchasers to support that! Believe me, they don't care what your background is, they would rather deliver the product and make the money while fuel prices are still high!
  • James dekecds 2012/08/02 01:47:10
    James
    +1
    Many of my clients are freight carriers and you're right. They do have to provide their own training and certification. They even have to provide their own truck even. What's interesting is that many of them have told me that they don't want any Tom, Dick, or Harry coming on board and driving their trucks. They say that you can tell when someone puts their heart into something from someone whose just in it to make a buck or two. It also doesn't help that many logistic companies are charging per mile instead of per hour out here. I hope things go well for you out in Texas. I can't say it's like that everywhere.
  • dekecds James 2012/08/02 01:51:53
    dekecds
    Oh, no, I agree it's not great everywhere and trucking (especially owner/operators) have it harder than a lot of others, but most are still making better money than the 70% of the nation that are pulling in less than 50K per year.
  • TKramar dekecds 2012/09/05 11:51:33
    TKramar
    My uncle is 65...and still driving a truck. He's been driving all his life...but he doesn't feel like he can retire.
  • TKramar dekecds 2012/08/10 21:03:49
    TKramar
    +2
    $200 is a lot for many people to put out, and not everyone is guaranteed to pass the required tests for a CDL. In fact, considering the poor quality of the average driver, you wouldn't want most of them to get a CDL to boot.
  • dekecds James 2012/08/01 03:48:00
    dekecds
    +1
    First, Im 32, not twice your age.
    Second, I haven't acquired so much debt that I can't live off of minimum wages.
    Third, you are not a youth anymore.
    Fourth, the only way that you become "over qualified" for most jobs is by submitting a resume to a workplace that indicates qualifications which would prompt an increase in the median pay for the applied for position. ( you don't have to lie, but you also need not disclose to the fast-food supervisor that you are a college grad)
    By the way, I am not a college grad, because it does not make sense financially to achieve a degree straight out of Highschool unless you are intending on working in a very select few fields (Medicine, Law, Accounting, Highly Specific Engineering such as Energy Production, Petroleum, Thermodynamic, Electrical, or Language Specific Software Engineering and a few others)
    What has made me successful so far is the fact that I vigilantly saved an emergency fund with a minimum balance of one year's wages to cover an extended job loss scenario.(that took me four years to achieve)
    I recently (October 2011) transitioned from a 95K year job (it took me ten years to reach that pay scale and it started at about15K per year for about the first three years) to the open job market.
    I finally landed a job last month, afte...



    First, Im 32, not twice your age.
    Second, I haven't acquired so much debt that I can't live off of minimum wages.
    Third, you are not a youth anymore.
    Fourth, the only way that you become "over qualified" for most jobs is by submitting a resume to a workplace that indicates qualifications which would prompt an increase in the median pay for the applied for position. ( you don't have to lie, but you also need not disclose to the fast-food supervisor that you are a college grad)
    By the way, I am not a college grad, because it does not make sense financially to achieve a degree straight out of Highschool unless you are intending on working in a very select few fields (Medicine, Law, Accounting, Highly Specific Engineering such as Energy Production, Petroleum, Thermodynamic, Electrical, or Language Specific Software Engineering and a few others)
    What has made me successful so far is the fact that I vigilantly saved an emergency fund with a minimum balance of one year's wages to cover an extended job loss scenario.(that took me four years to achieve)
    I recently (October 2011) transitioned from a 95K year job (it took me ten years to reach that pay scale and it started at about15K per year for about the first three years) to the open job market.
    I finally landed a job last month, after almost 8 months of searching for a passable opening, that pays about 43K per year.
    Was it a lengthy search? Yes! Was it hard to find a job? No! I passed up several minimum wage jobs and a few that were slightly more than that because I had saved enough to carry me through to at least December of next year at a comfortable level (about 36K per year).
    Frugality and money sense go much further than your new Camaro and big screen TV that seem so easy to just buy on credit. Also, the issues that I have seen with most college grads seems to be an overinflated sense of entitlement to a "good paying job" because of their degree.
    Very few fields offer a better than median salary straight out of college, and those that do are not always reliant upon staying with a company for your entire career. You must be prepared to make ends meet flipping burgers if need be when the market for your experience tanks or your company is bought out/ bottomed out.
    If you've got all that in line, and you still can't find a job, you are simply impatient, lazy, or too selective about what you are willing to accept as a career. I've been there, I was all of those things, but I was also prepared and can't complain about "not finding" a job for 8 months.
    (more)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 12 Next » Last »

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

News & Politics

2014/04/21 02:09:54

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals