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Tea Party vs. Progressive liberal Republicans — Battle for the Soul of the GOP

Obama Failed America 2012/12/08 18:12:48
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Since Nov. 6, there has been no shortage of opinions as to why
challenger Mitt Romney and the Republican Party failed to ouster
President Barack Obama. Pre-election divisions in the Republican Party
between moderates and conservatives have only widened since Romney’s
defeat and the party’s strategy for the future remains unclear, a source
of contention and heated internal & external debate.


Series on Republican PartySpecifically,
many now wonder what the sobering 2012 election results means for the
right-leaning Tea Party, the champions of personal freedom and smaller
government who exploded on the political scene in the 2010 midterm
elections. The re-election of a progressive like Barack Obama would
seem to signal the end of the conservative Tea Party, but the movement’s
conservative leaders insist that last month’s election results only
vindicate the group’s message.


“The Tea Party is not a political party; it’s an informal community
of Americans who support a set of fiscally conservative issues,” says
FreedomWorks’ Matt Kibbe. “And when you take a look at the roster of
new fiscal conservatives being sent to Congress next year, it’s clear
our issues are winning.”


Indeed, although the Tea Party may be focusing the vast majority of
its ongoing efforts on local issues, the conservative movement has left
an undeniable mark on the national GOP establishment. The group’s
mantra of uncompromising fiscal conservatism and limited government has
remained a driving force in shaping Republican platform.

For proof of this, one need look no further than Rep. Paul Ryan’s
ascendancy to the No. 2 spot on the GOP ticket. Once considered a
fringe of the congressional conservative coalition, Tea Party-backed
fiscal hawks like Ryan are now considered key players at the core of
today’s Republican Party.


Critics, of course, will argue that Romney’s defeat in November
signals a rebuff of these ideals. “The 2012 elections have been the
undoing of the 2010 Tea Party tsunami that crashed upon Washington,” the
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) proclaimed in November. “The Tea Party is over.”


But the actual election results suggests this declaration is a bit
exaggerated and vastly underestimates the conservative Tea Party’s
influence in the GOP.


Despite defeats in states like Indiana and Missouri, the Republican
Senate caucus gained three new Tea Party-backed members with the
addition of Ted Cruz of Texas, Jeff Flake of Arizona and Deb Fischer of
Nebraska. In the House, the Congressional Tea Party Caucus had 60
members before election day. Of those 60, six did not seek re-election,
seven lost their races and 47 were re-elected. In addition, candidates
endorsed by former GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum’s
conservative PAC — Missouri’s Ann Wagner and Montana’s Steve Daines —
also secured victories for the right.


“The Election Day losers were not the so-called ‘tea partiers,’”
Kibbe points out, “they were the candidates embraced by (and some
hand-picked by) the Republican establishment who failed to run on the
winning message of economic freedom.” When you boil it down, Kibbe
argues, the lack of serious conservative candidates in 2012 meant many
principled Republican voters chose to just stay home on Election Day.


This much is true — GOP turnout in 2012 was lower than both the 2008
and 2004 elections. Turnout this year dropped by 7.9 million voters,
falling to 123.6 million from 131.5 million in 2008. This year’s
underwhelmed electorate marked the first decline in a presidential
election in 16 years. Additionally, only 51.3% of the voting-age
population went to the polls. When you couple low turnout with a few
obnoxious and offensive comments on rape from gaffe-prone politicians,
it’s hard to say whether the GOP ran with bad policies or just bad
candidates.


History also seems to be on the Tea Party’s side. Election results aside, Bloomberg News‘ Albert Hunt predicted the end the GOP establishment and continued rise of the conservative movement after Romney clinched the party’s nomination:


From Washington to the state capitals to the local level,
the movement conservatives are in the ascendancy. For years, the
Republican base was divided; it’s now dominated by the movement types.


A comparison of Reagan’s last year in office to today illustrates the
dramatic change. Then, more than one-third of Senate Republicans were
either genuine liberals such as Mark Hatfield, Lowell Weicker and Arlen
Specter or moderates such as Bill Cohen, Bob Packwood and Nancy
Kassebaum. With the retirement of Olympia Snowe of Maine there’ll be no
more than two or three moderate Republicans in the Senate next year.


A quarter-century ago there were dozens of moderate Republicans in
the House, members like Chris Shays of Connecticut, Amo Houghton of New
York, Bill Gradison of Ohio, Tom Ridge of Pennsylvania and Bill Frenzel
of Minnesota. Today there are very few House Republicans who break with
conservative orthodoxy.


The changes are equally dramatic at the state and local level.
Moderate Republican governors are relics. In Kansas this month, the
right wing, led by the state’s conservative governor, drummed a number
of the Bob Dole-type centrist Republicans out of the party.


Columbia University political science Professor Brigitte Naco has
studied the rise and influence of the Tea Party movement. “Some
Democrats say the Tea Party is dead. That’s all baloney,” Naco says.
“The fact of the matter is when you look at the basic agenda of the
Republican ticket, it’s pretty much what the Tea Party likes.”


But does the GOP’s Old Guard establishment acknowledge or understand this fact?


In recent weeks, House Speaker John Boehner has appeared wobbly on
his commitment to the New Guard’s steadfast fiscal conservatism. Before
the election, Boehner downplayed any likelihood of a Republican
compromise on the so-called fiscal cliff
— the $1.2 trillion in mandatory spending cuts coming at the end of
this year. But after Romney’s defeat, Boehner seemed to pivot, then
characterizing Republicans’ re-elected House majority as a mandate to
find “common ground” with House Democrats who demand increased spending
and higher taxes.


“There will be some kind of war” between the GOP establishment and
the Tea Party over the future direction of the party, longtime
Republican Party consultant Mike Murphy told the New York Times.
On one side of the divide there are “mathematicians” like Murphy who
argue that the GOP must shift its political strategy and policy focus to
attract the votes of Hispanics, blacks, younger voters and women; on
the other, there are those who believe that basic conservative
principles — when articulated appropriately — will ultimately restore
unity within the party and attract a wider base of national voters in
the future.


Whatever course the party chooses to pursue, it will need to decide
quickly as the countdowns to the 2014 midterms and 2016 presidential
election have already begun. “We are in a situation where the Democrats
are getting a massive amount of votes for free,” Murphy warns.


“Republicans need not jettison their principles. But they must avoid
appearing judgmental and callous on social issues,” esteemed GOP
strategist Karl Rove argued in the days following the election.


Tea Party favorite and Florida Senator Marco Rubio agrees: “The party has to continually ask ourselves, What
do we represent? But we have to remain the movement on behalf of
upward mobility, the party people identify with their hopes and dreams.
People want to have a chance.”


FreedomWorks’ Kibbe predicts the party’s pivotal shift that began in
2010 has put the GOP’s Old Guard on a collision course with a new
generation of Republican leaders, including Rubio, Ryan, Sen. Rand Paul
of Kentucky, Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia and Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Walker, whose steadfast support of small government and limited spending
launched him to national fame in a (successful) battle against some of
the country’s most ruthless labor unions.


“You are going to see a continuation of the fight between the Old
Guard and all of the new blood that has come in since 2010, but I don’t
know how dramatic it is going to be,” Kibbe says. “It is getting to
point where you can’t reach back and pull another establishment
Republican from the queue like we have done with Romney.”


With Republicans holding onto their strong majority in the House of
Representatives, we may see a more conservative voting bloc emerge in
the 113th Congress than the 112th, and the ongoing debate over the
nation’s fiscal crisis may be a good indicator of the divided Republican
Party’s trajectory for the next four years.


Will the party establishment steer the party to be more conciliatory
when pressured by the White House and Democrats on Capitol Hill, or will
the GOP dig in against political concessions that threaten their
undermining ideological principles?


“Republicans lost this year because they failed to recognize that
economic freedom is trending in America. The shareholders in America
have spoken, and they want senior management to stay out of their homes
and to stop spending money we don’t have,” Kibbe wrote days after
Obama’s re-election. “The party that can communicate that message is
the party that will win over the American electorate come 2014.”

Read More: http://www.theblaze.com/stories/tea-party-vs-progr...

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  • texasred 2012/12/10 03:21:32
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    texasred
    +1
    I hope and pray we will. But we have to stop the divisiveness that is being perpetrated by the angry Ron Paul supporters. We have to remember that we need the Independents and that many of them are moderates. There has to be a answer to this without selling our souls. Focus on fiscal issues and put the social issues aside.
  • Rodney 2012/12/09 07:31:52
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Rodney
    +1
    With 33 Senate seats up this next election cycle, 20 of which are Democrat held seat... if Barry doesn't become a leader and help them along, we will see a shift of power again in the Senate.
  • goatman112003 2012/12/09 00:03:38
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    goatman112003
    +1
    They will win because things will continue to deteriorate. This is one round of a 15 round fight.
  • Mike 2012/12/08 23:17:18
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Mike
    +2
    Conservatives must understand, it took about 100 years to slowly move off the US Constitution to some progressive liberal “living constitution”. We must be prepared to accept the fact in the probability, that there may be no quick fix.

    The Conservative strategy should be simple by getting back to the basics. Promoting and understanding our Unalienable Rights as the foundation to the Conservative directive. These Rights are the foundational building blocks and by understanding them, opens many doors within our US Constitutional structure, whose footing rest upon such blocks. The key is to understand our Unalienable Rights from the vantage point of science (“Scientific Proof of Our Unalienable Rights, a Road to Utopia”, Takac, 2012). Jefferson said our Unalienable Rights are part of “the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God.” Takac scientifically proved our Unalienable Rights are part of the Laws of Nature and progressive liberals pride themselves in surfing on the waves of science.

    All Tea Party folks should read Takac’s book! Perhaps, understanding these Laws of Nature, may save our Nation.
  • rdmatheny Mike 2012/12/08 23:51:42
    rdmatheny
    +2
    Very good points indeed.
  • SK-pro scramnesty 2012/12/08 22:07:08
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    SK-pro scramnesty
    +1
    All RINOs need to just go ahead and put a skirt on and a D by their name so it would be so much easier to identify them.
  • rdmatheny SK-pro ... 2012/12/08 22:32:39
    rdmatheny
    +2
    It's easy to identify them. Just look at their voting record. Of course, that involves turning off the TV and doing "real" research. That's right, wouldn't want to keep someone from watching American Idol or Dancin' with the stars and heaven forbid Fox (Faux) News.
  • SK-pro ... rdmatheny 2012/12/08 23:47:06
    SK-pro scramnesty
    +1
    And you should turn off CNN, MSLSD and the other commy alphabet channels.
  • rdmatheny SK-pro ... 2012/12/08 23:49:43
    rdmatheny
    Oh, I did that many many years ago.
  • SK-pro ... rdmatheny 2012/12/08 23:58:31
    SK-pro scramnesty
    +1
    And i don't watch although i guess if i had cable i would. FOX is not perfect but it's the best news source on the idiot tube that we have. But my news comes from other sources and mostly my own common sense to be able to weed out bs from reality; even from the liberal leaning libertarian party. Ron Paul has his own little corner of what he thinks the Constitution should be. He got an F on defense is why he was not relevant. I'm all for limited government but i don't need some wacked out crotchity old man who's been in gooberment work for thirty years and has done diddly squat to tell me that.
  • rdmatheny SK-pro ... 2012/12/09 00:29:08
    rdmatheny
    +2
    Ron Paul got a "F" on Defense? That's strange. Not according to Foreign Policy experts.
    -------------
    A growing number of foreign policy experts are agreeing with Texas congressman Ron Paul’s controversial views on American foreign policy, which have alienated Republicans who otherwise agree with the presidential hopeful.

    Christopher Preble, vice president for defense and foreign policy studies at the Cato Institute, told ABC News that Paul is right when he says the United States does not need a massive military presence across the globe. Outside of terrorist threats, America is safe due to its geography and huge stockpile of nuclear weapons, he said.

    Prelbe added that the US military is being used in conflicts that have little to no national interest, such as the Iraq war, and credits Paul with being an outspoken critic of the invasion back in 2003. Read More: http://www.therightperspectiv...
  • SK-pro ... rdmatheny 2012/12/09 00:41:46
    SK-pro scramnesty
    Now see there ya go. getting your news from God only knows where. i'm guessing you follow Alex Jones.
  • rdmatheny SK-pro ... 2012/12/09 00:49:18
    rdmatheny
    +1
    At times I follow Alex Jones. Then I do further research to substantiate whatever he's reporting.
  • SK-pro ... rdmatheny 2012/12/09 01:00:26
    SK-pro scramnesty
    How many times have cycled through all the Zeitgeist videos?
  • rdmatheny 2012/12/08 21:51:59
    No Progressive liberal Republicans will win this war.
    rdmatheny
    By reading this article, the progressives who infiltrated the 2007 TEA Party in 2009 are up to their to dirty tricks again, promoting their faux conservatives to make them look like TEA Party. Here's what I'm talking about.
    --------------
    The group’s
    mantra of uncompromising fiscal conservatism and limited government has
    remained a driving force in shaping Republican platform.

    For proof of this, one need look no further than Rep. Paul Ryan’s
    ascendancy to the No. 2 spot on the GOP ticket. Once considered a
    fringe of the congressional conservative coalition, Tea Party-backed
    fiscal hawks like Ryan are now considered key players at the core of
    today’s Republican Party.
    -------> Since when did big government, bailout money Paul Ryan become a fiscal conservative. Uh never. He likes to wear the conservative name tag, but in real life, he's no where close.
    ---------------------
    In addition, candidates
    endorsed by former GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum’s
    conservative PAC — Missouri’s Ann Wagner and Montana’s Steve Daines —
    also secured victories for the right.
    ---------------> Again, here we have a faux conservative (Santorum) putting his stamp on future status quo "team players".
    --------------------
    “Republicans need not jettison their principles. But they must avoid
    appeari...



    >

    By reading this article, the progressives who infiltrated the 2007 TEA Party in 2009 are up to their to dirty tricks again, promoting their faux conservatives to make them look like TEA Party. Here's what I'm talking about.
    --------------
    The group’s
    mantra of uncompromising fiscal conservatism and limited government has
    remained a driving force in shaping Republican platform.

    For proof of this, one need look no further than Rep. Paul Ryan’s
    ascendancy to the No. 2 spot on the GOP ticket. Once considered a
    fringe of the congressional conservative coalition, Tea Party-backed
    fiscal hawks like Ryan are now considered key players at the core of
    today’s Republican Party.
    -------> Since when did big government, bailout money Paul Ryan become a fiscal conservative. Uh never. He likes to wear the conservative name tag, but in real life, he's no where close.
    ---------------------
    In addition, candidates
    endorsed by former GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum’s
    conservative PAC — Missouri’s Ann Wagner and Montana’s Steve Daines —
    also secured victories for the right.
    ---------------> Again, here we have a faux conservative (Santorum) putting his stamp on future status quo "team players".
    --------------------
    “Republicans need not jettison their principles. But they must avoid
    appearing judgmental and callous on social issues,” esteemed GOP
    strategist Karl Rove argued in the days following the election.

    Tea Party favorite and Florida Senator Marco Rubio agrees:
    -------------> Here's another example of the hijacked TEA Party trying to fool the masses. Karl Rove and Marco Rubio do NOT represent what the TEA Party stands for. Rove who just heavily backed a Massachusetts Liberal for President and Rubio who has publicly stated his support of more illegal wars and increased military spending are far from TEA Party and are puppets for the status quo leaders.

    With articles like this, those dumbed down Fox News Zombies and Status quo sheep will buy into this nonsense and continue the Progressive agenda. Until the TEA Party wises up and start using some critical thinking skills and turn off the damn TV. These progressives will continue to win.
    (more)
  • gregory.brown.5030 2012/12/08 21:26:39
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    gregory.brown.5030
    +1
    the repubs lost the election because the used the same old warn twenty year old playbook. They are no more in touch with the desires of the party than the dummycrats are. Instead of giving us a candidate we could all get behind, they tried to persuade the people who were already set on voting for obama and gave us obama lite.
  • Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F 2012/12/08 21:03:34
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F
    +1
    In the end, fiscal conservatism must win out or we are doomed. Only the TEA Party is willing to make it happen. RINO's are nothing but collaborators with the Obama regime. Boehner, I'm talking to you especially! You are either with patriotic Americans or you are on the side of the Demunists. There is no room for compromise any longer.
  • Always Right 2012/12/08 20:32:34
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Always Right
    +2
    The party elites are on notice, the TEA Party is here to stay and to have a say, from local to state to federal elections.
  • macbeth Always ... 2013/01/10 13:49:04
    macbeth
    Then I think its only fair that the teabaggers secede from the GOP and set up stall on their own.
  • Always ... macbeth 2013/01/10 17:48:26
    Always Right
    +1
    You think I care what your opinion is! You're the teabagger, I'm a TEA Party member!
  • macbeth Always ... 2013/01/10 18:58:49
    macbeth
    Lucky you. Whoop de doo.
  • Artist~PWCM~ 2012/12/08 19:46:01
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Artist~PWCM~
    +1
    I think the Republican party was very divided unlike the liberals who had all their ducks in a row...granted the liberals lied about every damn thing they could think of, real records were not on the table for them or us. Unless we get a real ball-breaker like Chris Christy or Allen West in there to shake out the deadwood and stabilize the party, the Republicans are dead...
  • ConLibFraud 2012/12/08 19:40:39
    No Progressive liberal Republicans will win this war.
    ConLibFraud
    +1
    Here you sheeple who live in denial. Watch this then think again ...

  • Aqua Su... ConLibF... 2012/12/08 21:05:35
    Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F
    +1
    He won't run again so we have to look elsewhere.
  • ConLibF... Aqua Su... 2012/12/09 09:13:39
    ConLibFraud
    +1
    Explain to me how you totally missed the point? You didn't watch the video did you?
  • S and S 2012/12/08 19:11:20
  • ConLibF... S and S 2012/12/08 19:41:03
    ConLibFraud
    Exactly!
  • Temlakos~POTL~PWCM~JLA~☆ 2012/12/08 19:02:16
    Yes the Tea Party will win this war
    Temlakos~POTL~PWCM~JLA~☆
    +5
    We'll either take over the Republican Party or supersede it and bury the old machine completely.
  • S and S Temlako... 2012/12/08 19:13:26
  • ConLibF... S and S 2012/12/08 19:41:39
    ConLibFraud
    +1
    OOORAH!
  • ConLibF... Temlako... 2012/12/08 19:41:23
    ConLibFraud
    LOL! How you going to do that?
  • Roger47 2012/12/08 18:58:01
    No Progressive liberal Republicans will win this war.
    Roger47
    " says
    FreedomWorks’ Matt Kibbe."
    The Tea party is a Freedomworks creation. And Freedomworks is a creation of the Koch brothers. There is nothing grassroots about it. Freedomworks and the Koch brothers are using well-meaning citizens to pursue their corporate agenda. Fortunately, most Americans were able to see right through this. And that is why the Republicans lost in 2012.
  • SK-pro ... Roger47 2012/12/08 22:10:01
    SK-pro scramnesty
    +1
    And obama is the creation of the Communist Party USA, i guess that makes us even.
  • Roger47 SK-pro ... 2012/12/09 04:17:49
    Roger47
    How's the weather in the bubble?
  • SK-pro ... Roger47 2012/12/09 04:50:38
    SK-pro scramnesty
    +1
    You tell me.
  • rdmatheny Roger47 2012/12/09 16:20:32
    rdmatheny
    +1
    Matt Kibbe can take that statement and shove it where the sun doesn't shine. The TEA Party is NOT, was NOT a creation of Freedomworks.
  • Rebel Yell 2012/12/08 18:50:45
    No Progressive liberal Republicans will win this war.
    Rebel Yell
    I know of no Progressive Liberal Republicans. That terminology is used by the Tea Party in reference to anyone who does not believe in their scorched earth agenda and desire to return to the frontier days.

    The Tea Party extremists will never understand the demographics of this country. In their little circle, they are white and evangelical and therefore know best. They have no message that resonates with a country so ethnically and culturally diverse. Nothing.

    Paul Ryan hooked his wagon to the Tea Party. Listen to him now, looking ahead to 2016... talking about poverty programs and the middle class importance. Too liittle, too late. He will never be President and neither will any candidate endorsed by the Tea Party. They are toxic.
  • Striker Rebel Yell 2012/12/08 19:24:36
    Striker
    +3
    So Romney is not a progressive, yet supports socialism and Force?
  • ConLibF... Rebel Yell 2012/12/08 19:42:42
    ConLibFraud
    +3
    Why do you bend over and accept a debt you did not create?
  • Aqua Su... Rebel Yell 2012/12/08 21:08:06
    Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F
    +2
    Your stereotypical ignorance is showing. How embarassing! embarassed

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