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Yahwey is Dagon


The Philistine god Dagon received a bad press in the Bible, because he was Yahweh's chief rival at the time and also a more popular deity. One writer claimed that the mere presence of Yahweh's ark in Dagon's temple, as a spoil of war, destroyed Dagon's image and caused the temple to be deserted forever (1 Samuel 5:1-5). This seems to have been mere wishful thinking, because a century or so later the cult of Dagon was still lively, and the Philistine god received the head of Saul as another spoil of war (1 Chronicles 10:10).

Actually, the fish-tailed god Dagon was just another form of the Babylonian Ea or Oannes, king of the sea, who in turn was the basis for the legend of Jonah. An icon of the fish-tailed god, or of his human-headed spirit arising from the mouth of a fish, was later reinterpreted as Jonah emerging from his whale. Dagon or Oannes also represented the sun going down into the sea and "reborn" from the waters, the latter personified as his mother-spouse, Atargatis or Derceto. 1 It was this mystic birth that gave rise to the derivative legend of Jonah's incubation and rebirth from the "womb" of the whale, as it was called in earlier biblical translations.

One of the names of this Mesopotamian deity actually suggested that he was identified with the biblical Yaweh at some period in his history. The name was given as Yah-Daganu, meaning literally: Yahweh is Dagon."
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  • Philo-Publius 2009/08/18 15:08:14
    Philo-Publius
    I am IMPRESSED that someone else has made this connection! Look too at the "burnt offerings" that are offered up as a "sweet savor unto Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament, and . I think this is exoteric though, a motif that rubbed off from the surrounding Mesopotamian cultures. In Psalm 18, v. 8, we read of Yahweh:

    "There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured: coals were kindled by it."

    Again, exoteric, but demonstrates the outward, zoomorphic connection of these various near east deities with dragons. The inner meaning of the dragon/serpent motif I think lies elsewhere. All the demiurges it seems, were connected with serpents. In the Sanskrit, "naga" is serpent, as is the "nagash/nachash" tempter of Genesis, who Eve (life) refers to in 3:3 in the same word, translated "touch". These are the creators or fashioners of the universe, or else of the primeval chaos (material principle) out of which "ANOTHER" "god" (who stands as the fashioner, or "victor") creates heaven, earth, &c.;

    These motifs seem to be mixed up horribly in Yahweh, who, in adition to everything matsulori just said, is ALSO personified as the CONQUEROR of the dragon, the leviathan or tannim, called also Rahab:

    "Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces, as one that is slain; thou hast...









    &c.;












    I am IMPRESSED that someone else has made this connection! Look too at the "burnt offerings" that are offered up as a "sweet savor unto Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament, and . I think this is exoteric though, a motif that rubbed off from the surrounding Mesopotamian cultures. In Psalm 18, v. 8, we read of Yahweh:

    "There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured: coals were kindled by it."

    Again, exoteric, but demonstrates the outward, zoomorphic connection of these various near east deities with dragons. The inner meaning of the dragon/serpent motif I think lies elsewhere. All the demiurges it seems, were connected with serpents. In the Sanskrit, "naga" is serpent, as is the "nagash/nachash" tempter of Genesis, who Eve (life) refers to in 3:3 in the same word, translated "touch". These are the creators or fashioners of the universe, or else of the primeval chaos (material principle) out of which "ANOTHER" "god" (who stands as the fashioner, or "victor") creates heaven, earth, &c.;

    These motifs seem to be mixed up horribly in Yahweh, who, in adition to everything matsulori just said, is ALSO personified as the CONQUEROR of the dragon, the leviathan or tannim, called also Rahab:

    "Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces, as one that is slain; thou hast scattered thine enemies with thy strong arm." -Ps. 89:10

    "Awake, awake, put on strength, O arm of the LORD; awake, as in the ancient days, in the generations of old. Art thou not it that hath cut Rahab, and wounded the dragon?" -Isa. 51:9

    (Rahab is also a HARLOT, and I see in her a connection of the "Great Whore of Babylon (chaos, babel) of Rev. 17, who is similarly slain)

    "He divideth the sea with his power, and by his understanding he smiteth through the proud. By his spirit he hath garnished the heavens; his hand hath formed the crooked serpent." -Job 26:12-13

    "In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent; and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea." -Isa. 27:1

    This seems to me a retelling of Tiamat, the primeval chaos-dragon, who is conquered by Marduk in the Enuma Elish, and from her slain body is formed the heavens and the earth, &c.; This is ALSO THE SAME MOTIF I HAVE CLAIMED ELSEWHERE of Jesus, as "the Lamb slain from (for) the foundation of the world" only with slightly more spiritual connotations of the redeemed (spiritualized or "resurrected" body, of the spiritual principle transforming this body (transfiguration on the mount with Moses & Elijah) and also the turning of water (the material principle) into wine (spirit). This is transubstantiation, is mystical, is gnostic, and is also alchemical.

    In the talmud, Leviathan has this same designation. He will be slain at the last day and will supply "food" for the righteous, and also his body will be used to make "tents". This is the same mystical transubstantiation of the physical body into the "spiritual" body, and only speaks of (in my estimation) the knowledge of the ancients regarding the fluctuation of matter in cycles or "coils" (spiraling or vacillation between states of relative "materiality" and "spirituality") which science of today knows very little about. Similar motifs are the serpent being lifted up (by Moses in Num. 21:9 and Jesus in Jn. 3:14), and this has parallels with the raised kindalini, the ida and pingala.

    But the demiurge, whether considered AS the serpent, or as the positive or spiritual pole of the Bythos or Chaos which divides itself and "conquers" or "molds" this serpent into the universe (portrayed by Blake in BOTH aspects in the painting below) it is always portrayed as serpentine, as Ialdabaoth ("child of Chaos") in the gnostic reckoning, and again in some schools, "Saklas" ("Thou Fool"-Jesus is made to refer to him in Matt. 5:22, much as he refers metaphorically to this same demiurge as "Caesar" ("He who was cut [off]") in Matt.21:21, et al.
    matt 522 refers metaphorically demiurge caesar cut matt 2121 al
    matt 522 refers metaphorically demiurge caesar cut matt 2121 al
    This demiurge was seen as evil by the gnostics, but not so by most other cults, as the word is derived actually from "demi" ("people's") and "ergon" ("worker", "fashioner"), this a "skilled worker" and "maker of man".

    My avatar, the gnostic "all and none" Parabrahmanic ABRAXAS, also shares similar symbolism; here the two serpents are underneath his skirt, and his head holds the opened eye of the cock, symbolizing eternal day beyond time and space... in other words, a state beyond everything, and yet included in everything, that which was before the demiurge.

    Thank you for reading Philo-Publius.

    I am interested in discussing this further with matsulori.
    (more)
  • matsulori Philo-P... 2009/08/21 00:08:40 (edited)
    matsulori
    +1
    Whenever I read of serpents, however alluded to, I always think of knowledge, as all my studies of archaeology and occult have taught me up to this point. "Knowledge" as you know covers many degrees within the psyche, and it never fails to touch me with a bit of awe how what may appear to be "simply material" knowledge can mean so much more on so many other levels. It is with this in mind that I read entries like the one that I blogged above. I never know when something I've read will hit me in a different way, when I'll understand it on a different level. It is one of my joys in life.

    You're much more conversant on the intricacies of the meanings of the subjects that I post. I wish that I could give you a challenging conversation. Please know that I find what you post endlessly fascinating.
  • Philo-P... matsulori 2009/08/21 00:25:23
    Philo-Publius
    You CAN challenge me, matsulori, and you DO! I was unaware of certain aspects of the blog, there was new information in there for me, too, which spurred me to think in new directions and make or strengthen different connections I had made!

    Serpents indeed represent knowledge in almost every culture. They are, I would go so far to say, the universal symbol of wisdom, and you are in touch with that fact. Believe me, most people I talk to still insist the serpent is evil, likely because of the Genesis story of the "tempter" and his eventual theological transformation into "the devil". As you know, the satan designation is nowhere in the story, one is an ancient near-east myth, and one is a much later eccesiastical invention.

    But even there(!) in Genesis, the serpent represented knowledge (of good and evil, "tov" and "ra" in Hebrew, which I have come to the conclusion is one of the meanings of the word "Torah": "tov v' ra", or "good and evil") and I would argue that any malevolent connotation the story carries is likely a blind to scare off those who would attempt to look deeper into it. I have argued that the entire book of Revelation for instance, can only be understood in this way, as each of the frightful motifs being read back into the positive (TRY IT)... I think this is...

    You CAN challenge me, matsulori, and you DO! I was unaware of certain aspects of the blog, there was new information in there for me, too, which spurred me to think in new directions and make or strengthen different connections I had made!

    Serpents indeed represent knowledge in almost every culture. They are, I would go so far to say, the universal symbol of wisdom, and you are in touch with that fact. Believe me, most people I talk to still insist the serpent is evil, likely because of the Genesis story of the "tempter" and his eventual theological transformation into "the devil". As you know, the satan designation is nowhere in the story, one is an ancient near-east myth, and one is a much later eccesiastical invention.

    But even there(!) in Genesis, the serpent represented knowledge (of good and evil, "tov" and "ra" in Hebrew, which I have come to the conclusion is one of the meanings of the word "Torah": "tov v' ra", or "good and evil") and I would argue that any malevolent connotation the story carries is likely a blind to scare off those who would attempt to look deeper into it. I have argued that the entire book of Revelation for instance, can only be understood in this way, as each of the frightful motifs being read back into the positive (TRY IT)... I think this is a characteristic of MUCH apolalyptic literature, not just "Jewish" as Christian.

    Post more whenever you can, I will watch for them, and if something else comes to mind on this or anything else that you'd like to discuss, reply here or send me a private mail. TTY soon then.
    (more)
  • matsulori Philo-P... 2009/08/21 00:52:30
    matsulori
    +1
    That whole, "oh, serpents are evil because of the garden of eve" drives me nuts. If the image of the serpent is so very evil, we wouldn't to this day have the caduceus as the epitome of non-harmful knowledge in the form of medical doctors.

    Thank you for your kind words, PP. My low readership bothers me not at all, as long as one person appreciates and understands the knowledge seeking behind it. Thanks for that. It means the world to me that one person, even if only one ever, knows that I don't just put this stuff out simply to taunt the christians. You're the best.
  • KC 2009/08/18 15:07:31
    KC
    +1
    Dagon seems to have been second only to El in power. He was one of four sons born to Anu. Dagon was also the father of Baal.Seeing as he was the fertility and corn god I suppose he is also the god of bio-fuels eh? I heard someone praying to him the other day, this guy said "Oh God, screw your bio-fuel crap." Anyway...K
  • matsulori 2009/08/18 06:45:26
    matsulori
    +2
    No, no flipper. But I guess he wished he had at least one!
  • Bob-chicka-wow-wow 2009/08/18 06:41:38
    Bob-chicka-wow-wow
    +3
    hes no flipper

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matsulori

matsulori

CA, US

2008/12/25 19:48:39

Cheddar, my kitty, died in my arms yesterday. I'm just in shock.

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