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Would you clone animals that are near extinction to save the species?

BrianD3 2012/07/05 11:16:12
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  • bags the Indigenous Guru 2012/07/05 14:04:18
    maybe, not sure of the unintended consequences
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    +3
    Just saving the species sometimes isn't enough. Example: In one of the big parks in Africa they were having problems with rhinos being killed by elephants. Not typical behaviour. They discovered through investigation that there were no mature elephant bulls there, and it was the adolescent bulls that were committing the killings. They shipped in two big fully grown mature bulls and soon thereafter the younger males were 'whipped into shape' and the killings stopped. We had never understood that elephants, like teenagers, need the guidance of a mature individual to understand what appropriate behaviour is. With cloning of a species, we circumvent this kind of guidance...and who knows what else we don't know and would crop up.

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  • Mark Twain 2012/07/06 14:06:12
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    Mark Twain
    Man proposes,,,,God disposes.
  • mama sew,gung ho 2012/07/06 04:54:28
    maybe, not sure of the unintended consequences
    mama sew,gung ho
    +1
    What would be the point,out of guilt?Cause if we don't do something quick,we gonna need cloning!"Who going to do us?"
  • Odinsown 2012/07/05 19:30:03
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    Odinsown
    +1
    I am all for it.
  • Jaroslav Dantes 2012/07/05 19:24:19
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    Jaroslav Dantes
    +1
    Nothing like that, that life is timing.
  • TuringsChild 2012/07/05 17:17:11
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    TuringsChild
    +1
    It wouldn't do any good. Clones have the same genetic makeup as their donor cells. You wouldn't be increasing biodiversity, just prolonging the inevitable.
  • BrianD3 Turings... 2012/07/05 18:47:41
    BrianD3
    +1
    kinda what I was thinking
  • rand 2012/07/05 17:09:10
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    rand
    +1
    ...but I'd leave it in the hands of private enterprise. I'll bet a real life Jurassic Park would be profitable. As for "unintended consequences", we have to face those either way.
  • skroehr 2012/07/05 15:01:36
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    skroehr
    +2
    Species have come and gone since the beginning of time. Oh well. There is a point to everything as long as it's relavant, and then they disappear. It's all part of a masterplan that's way above my paygrade. We can do minor, and reasonable conservation measures to assist a species to hold out a while, but cloning? When anybody starts cloning anything on a regular basis, we as a civilization are in the bottom 1/2 of the ninth inning. It is probably the most arrogant and repugnant technology which man as been endeavoring to learn, and is one of a small handful of technological advances that I pray for scientists to lock up, destroy the key, weld the lock, and drop the whole idea down a deep dark hole to hell from whence the ideas for cloning living things emanated in the first place. As a famous margarine commercial used to say....."it's not nice to fool with mother nature" ;-)
  • Christopher Kirchen 2012/07/05 14:23:01
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    Christopher Kirchen
    +2
    In the inter-species battle of the bands, HUMANS ROCK THE HARDEST.
  • bags the Indigenous Guru 2012/07/05 14:04:18
    maybe, not sure of the unintended consequences
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    +3
    Just saving the species sometimes isn't enough. Example: In one of the big parks in Africa they were having problems with rhinos being killed by elephants. Not typical behaviour. They discovered through investigation that there were no mature elephant bulls there, and it was the adolescent bulls that were committing the killings. They shipped in two big fully grown mature bulls and soon thereafter the younger males were 'whipped into shape' and the killings stopped. We had never understood that elephants, like teenagers, need the guidance of a mature individual to understand what appropriate behaviour is. With cloning of a species, we circumvent this kind of guidance...and who knows what else we don't know and would crop up.
  • Rebel Yell 2012/07/05 14:02:39
    maybe, not sure of the unintended consequences
    Rebel Yell
    +2
    Much as been written about loss of water sources globally , as well as the many people world wide who are food deprived or food insecure. Let's just keep looking at the pics of woolly mammoths and dinos. I don't think anyone wants to house them, feed them and make certain they have plenty of fresh water. Far too many people and animals already have those needs.
  • Wayne TH G 333 2012/07/05 13:44:29
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    Wayne TH G 333
    +1
    Yes I am all for it!
  • ☆ QueenAline 2012/07/05 13:44:14
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    ☆ QueenAline
    +2
    i think that if a species is near extinction, then there is a reason for it....If it's meant to expire, then so be it...
  • bags th... ☆ Queen... 2012/07/05 14:05:13
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    +1
    Most species teetering on the brink of extinction are there because of mankind, and not a process of nature.
  • ☆ Queen... bags th... 2012/07/05 14:10:17
    ☆ QueenAline
    +2
    Then i believe that nature will make a correction, and we will find another species not yet discovered....nature is a wonderful thing, if we would just let it run it's course.
  • bags th... ☆ Queen... 2012/07/05 14:21:53
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    Our assault on the environment has been so violent and intense over such a short period of time (in the scheme of things) that Nature hasn't had the time needed to make it's corrections. Who knows how many species have gone undiscovered and have passed from the face of this planet. Nature is a wonderful thing...but we aren't letting it run it's course.
  • ☆ Queen... bags th... 2012/07/05 19:58:33
    ☆ QueenAline
    +2
    how do you know which species have gone undiscovered and passed....how many have yet to be discovered?.you're too hard on Mother Nature..remember that quote"IT'S NOT NICE TO FOOL MOTHER
    NATURE?"..So.,..cloning to me, is fooling her
  • bags th... ☆ Queen... 2012/07/05 20:52:06
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    I agree on that cloning thing. But we're kidding ourselves if we thibk we're kidding her. I read that Dolly the sheep died earlier than antticipated because at maturity she was 'older' than her chronological age. That she was physically approx. the same age as she was when the DNA was taken from her for the cloning. So, at a year she was physically equal to the age of 7 years.

    Nope, no fooling Mother Nature that way.
  • skroehr bags th... 2012/07/05 15:03:10
    skroehr
    +2
    Mankind isn't natural?
  • bags th... skroehr 2012/07/05 15:07:10
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    Interesting question. i could argue both sides of that one......
  • BrianD3 bags th... 2012/07/05 17:13:30 (edited)
    BrianD3
    +1
    mankind is just another predator as far as nature is concerned. How many specied have become extinct at the hands of other predators?
  • bags th... BrianD3 2012/07/05 18:37:14
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    Nowhere near what we account for. We are the only species who kill for reasons other than defense or food.
  • BrianD3 bags th... 2012/07/05 18:48:29
    BrianD3
    +1
    naw, there are examples in nature of killing for territorial reasons or of bullying
  • bags th... BrianD3 2012/07/05 20:53:43
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    True. Territoriality I missed, and I know better. However, bullying tends to be a primate behaviour. And trophy hunting, indeed hunting for sport, is not a truly natural behaviour.
  • BrianD3 bags th... 2012/07/06 11:04:41
    BrianD3
    do you honestly believe that hunting for sport is the major factor in most species potential extinction?
  • bags th... BrianD3 2012/07/06 14:04:47
    bags the Indigenous Guru
    No, it's form of behaviour indicative of the nature of the beast. Mankind has led to the extinction of species by merely supplanting them. Snakeheads and Asian Carp (types of Asian fish) have been introduced to the US by humans. Both varieties are exterminating native species. Loss of habitat due to human expansion and habitation. And, I am aware off no other species that kill ALL other predators in their area, AWA potential food sources!!!
  • MlssCue =Go Blue= 2012/07/05 13:06:35
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    MlssCue =Go Blue=
    +2
    It is what it is, let it be.
  • Playerazzi 2012/07/05 12:12:29
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    Playerazzi
    +2
    Sure. In fact, I think it would be a good idea to do a "Jurassic Park" kind of thing, if it's possible.
  • Mimosa 2012/07/05 12:07:06
    nope, let mother nature sort out who survives and who does not
    Mimosa
    +3
    There is a natureal order of things.
  • Ben Mimosa 2012/07/05 13:00:17
    Ben
    +2
    Not really. The balance of nature shifts constantly and we humans shift it even more and have done so for thousands of years, so why not shift it in a way that actually increases biodiversity for once?
  • BrianD3 Ben 2012/07/05 13:37:07
    BrianD3
    +2
    I would be concerned about the cloning as it would limit the gene pool and reinforce recessive traits. I am not sure if it would end well in the long run.
  • Ben BrianD3 2012/07/05 14:08:41
    Ben
    +1
    Oh ideally you'd have several individual sources of DNA to clone but the likelihood of this is pretty rare for most species. So yes, you'd have a limited gene pool so they'd be very susceptible to disease and recessive traits would be more prevalent - ahdn't thought about that side of the argument before.
  • Mimosa Ben 2012/07/05 15:38:53
    Mimosa
    +1
    Because it wouldn't stop there. We would really have problems if scientists start cloning dinosaurs to roam the earth along side humans. We would be extinct very shortly thereafter.
  • Ben Mimosa 2012/07/06 09:27:09
    Ben
    Doubtful. First of all it strongly depends on what dinosaurs they cloned. I can't imagine Compsognathus being more than a nuisance if they ran amok. Secondly, although a human vs a Tyrannosaurus would be a one sided battle, that human has technology. So a human in an apache helicopter/battle tank/bunker with a friend using an rpg, I think that even if the worst did happen and we lost control of where the dinosaurs were, we would easily handle the situation. After all, humans haven't gone extinct in Africa or Australia despite the many dangerous animals there.

    And remember that the modern world is very different in terms of chemistry and biology alone (the atmosphere is different and many extinct plant species that would form the basis for each food chain back then are gone) and this would make dino survival very tricky without human help.
  • esteeopolis 2012/07/05 11:49:00
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    esteeopolis
    +1
    The worst thing that could happen is the resurrected animal killing off the human race or a mutation of said animal killing off the human race. Is that really such a bad thing though?
  • kir 2012/07/05 11:45:56
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    kir
    +2
    Actually I want to see a genetic library project where member's of a species have their DNA coded in digital form for later retrieval. If that kind of project could be combined with the ability to rebuild a DNA sequence and a cell then we could always repopulate an area or bring a species to a new planet.
  • Dagon 2012/07/05 11:42:46
  • ray 2012/07/05 11:30:05
    Yes, it is worth any risk to save a species
    ray
    +1
    Lonesome George is the last of his species . He Died June 24 2012 .
    The Giant land tortoise is now extinct . Fast action may correct this .
    Giant Tortoise ‘Lonesome George’ Dies in the Galapagos
    Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2012...
  • Lord Emperor Kami Guro Bage... 2012/07/05 11:24:57
    maybe, not sure of the unintended consequences
    Lord Emperor Kami Guro Bagels Supreme Ruler of the Earth
    +2
    I wants me a minie mammoth

    dwarf mammoth

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