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Will we ever be fighting a war on American soil? Is it coming no matter what we do?

Sir Jim 2007/10/16 10:47:25
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  • jackrorabbit 2007/10/16 13:12:04
    Yes
    jackrorabbit
    +2
    And it may come from a group of people wanting to secede from the U.S. from disenfranchisement. We elect them in, and they refuse to listen to us. Taxes have gone from a top rate of 7% in 1913, to as high as 88% in the mid 40's to now 35%.
    For the working man they went from 1-2% up to 25% on average. All of this in less than 100 years.

    http://www.historyplace.com/u...

    History of taxes from England before we declared independence. People are getting very tired of the partisanship in government, and even more tired of the wasteful spending ect. Between the lack of border protection, the tax burden, and the war in Iraq, there is more and more divide between the government and the people. At some point we will reach the "last straw".

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  • Reaper 2009/07/16 08:40:53
    Yes
    Reaper
    Most definitely, very soon these civi's are gonna have to pay for the betrayal of the Republic and the Constitution
  • ZOLTON1 2008/12/27 01:38:09
    Yes
    ZOLTON1
    we tend to shoot 1st
    ask questions laterer,
    COMMUNICATION is the answer
    know the facts before opening big mouth, then do the right thing, or at least try, TRY.
    yes we know its comming
  • Space Monkey 2008/02/17 01:12:31
    Undecided
    Space Monkey
    +1
    I have no idea, but God help them when they try to take the South. Can you imagine the roving bands of redneck guerrillas who know how to live off the land and are armed to the teeth AND know the terrain like the backs of the hands? :)
  • Smokey 2008/02/17 00:39:39
    Yes
    Smokey
    It'll be an INTERNAL WAR, and America we know today will not exsist in two decades if we continue to go down the road we are now.
  • ♥~Rainbow~♥ 2008/02/17 00:27:30
    Yes
    ♥~Rainbow~♥
    in my opinion there is one already started...at the mexican border and in mexico.. does La Raza sound familiar?.....it does to me...
  • Sir Jim ♥~Rainb... 2008/02/17 00:35:40
    Sir Jim
    Lets bomb em!
  • ♥~Rainb... Sir Jim 2008/02/17 00:39:25
    ♥~Rainbow~♥
    i dont think that is the answer...but i do think that our gov't should be treating them like terrorists...the ones that mean harm to the US and its people....and stop targeting American citizens as the evil doers...
  • mk, Smartass Oracle 2008/02/16 06:13:18
  • smokin bastard 2008/02/14 04:56:47
    Yes
    smokin bastard
    China one day will see to it that we are destroyed in there eyes... we will have a world war three...its enevitable as right now we are the only super power in the world and china wont have that forever.

    also We have pissed off 3/5 of our planet with our military operations... we should focus on making friends and not enemies at this point cause we are only 300 million ppl... there are 3 billion of us worldwide, and we cant kick everybodys ass....
  • Sir Jim smokin ... 2008/02/14 05:50:50
    Sir Jim
    But we have the weapons to kill 3 billion people if some idiot wanted to do that. We have the means to end all life on earth, as we know it. I’m talking nothing but cockroaches and Cher left…
  • smokin ... Sir Jim 2008/02/14 22:32:15
    smokin bastard
    +1
    lol, well you are right, we could just end the world, infact our war with china would probably like the cold war... until china was like... "do you know what they say about our c**ks over there?"..... "no... (whispers)" OH FUCK THAT MAN!!!!! and the the end of the world would officially begin....

    and after it was all said and done... cher would be queen of the cockroaches... and planet earth would be just a sad shadow where "do you believe in love " was played over and over until all all animals who escaped narrowly with thier lives from nuclear fall out were incinerated by pop 90's music and then... ONLY THE VERMIN WOULD SURVIVE!!!!

    omg!!! we must never have this war!!! lol
  • greenwoodtree 2007/10/16 17:35:25
    Yes
    greenwoodtree
    Yes, from within or from outside. Divided we fall, and divided we are. We can't even decide if terrorists are the enemy.
  • B4Real2Me 2007/10/16 13:33:38
    Yes
    B4Real2Me
    Yes, we're already fighting wars right here in America. There's the war against drugs, the war against racism/hatred, the war against illiteracy, the war against obesity and so many other battles. But if you’re talking about what’s going on in Iraq happening here… don’t we have door-to-door combat happening now in some cities with gang wars?
  • mrigor B4Real2Me 2007/10/16 16:24:27
    mrigor
    They use the term war to make the cause seem important. You really buy into that?
  • B4Real2Me mrigor 2007/10/16 18:57:40
    B4Real2Me
    Yes, I seriously think that this country of ours has a problem with crime, drugs and other ills. I've spent a great deal of my life fighting on the frontline to resolve racial issues and I'm still active in that fight. So yes, these issues and others are HIGHLY important. I'm sure everyone who is fighting their causes, be it cancer, education, protecting animals and everything else see their causes as being important.
  • jackrorabbit 2007/10/16 13:12:04
    Yes
    jackrorabbit
    +2
    And it may come from a group of people wanting to secede from the U.S. from disenfranchisement. We elect them in, and they refuse to listen to us. Taxes have gone from a top rate of 7% in 1913, to as high as 88% in the mid 40's to now 35%.
    For the working man they went from 1-2% up to 25% on average. All of this in less than 100 years.

    http://www.historyplace.com/u...

    History of taxes from England before we declared independence. People are getting very tired of the partisanship in government, and even more tired of the wasteful spending ect. Between the lack of border protection, the tax burden, and the war in Iraq, there is more and more divide between the government and the people. At some point we will reach the "last straw".
  • sluggostalker 2007/10/16 12:42:31
    No
    sluggostalker
    +1
    i dont think that is a viable threat.our biggest enemies are not organized countries,but rather small groups of radical extremists.i believe any organized assault on this country would be thwarted long before they begin fighting in our streets!i do however believe that we still need to remain alert and watch people who seem out of place!humans are very perceptive,but we have developed such a pattern of not wanting to get involved that it is allowing criminals to walk into our neighbors house and empty it out while theyre at work!if it looks out of place point it out!there is no harm done when its a false alarm!,but if its ignored plenty of harm is done!
  • Spider20 2007/10/16 11:19:02
    Undecided
    Spider20
    +2
    A militaristic war could happen, although the odds are a bit long at this time.....geurilla tactics are more the current conflict, what with all the threats of terrorism......
    however, we are already fighting a "hidden" war and not doing well.....job loss, economic loss......some areas of the country, like mine, are paying a big price....and losing.....
  • GEMINII : queen of hope 2007/10/16 10:57:20
    Undecided
    GEMINII : queen of hope
    it could happen and thats a scary thought!
  • Tiff 2007/10/16 10:53:45
    No
    Tiff
    I don't think so. I can't imagine it
  • jackror... Tiff 2007/10/16 13:14:25
    jackrorabbit
    +2
    Just because you can't imagine it, doesn't mean it wont happen. The civil war was real, and it did happen. Its major cause was a fight between state rights and government rights, we are reaching that point again with illegal immigration.
  • Tiff jackror... 2007/10/16 23:40:09
    Tiff
    America during the civil war is a lot different to the America now. It country's too wersternised to have a war on their own land. It's just not going to happen
  • jackror... Tiff 2007/10/17 12:43:07
    jackrorabbit
    That is exactly what they said in the years before the civil war.

    "Abraham Lincoln, speaking in 1858 reflected that "a house divided against itself cannot stand,"[1] stating that to be a unified nation, the United States would have to become all slave, or all free. Amid the emergence of increasingly virulent and hostile sectional ideologies in national politics, the collapse of the old Second Party System in the 1850s hampered efforts of the politicians to reach yet one more compromise. The compromise that was reached (the Kansas-Nebraska Act) outraged too many northerners. In the 1850s, with the rise of the Republican Party, the first major party with no appeal in the South, the industrializing North and agrarian Midwest became committed to the economic ethos of free-labor industrial capitalism. In 1860, the election of Abraham Lincoln, whom slave owners could not abide even though he had married into a slave owning family, finally triggered Southern secession from the union."

    Sounds like Red State/Blue State to me

    "Wendell Phillips, one of the most ardent abolitionists, attacked the Slave Power and presaged disunion as early as 1845:

    The experience of the fifty years… shows us the slaves trebling in numbers—slaveholders monopolizing the offices and dictating the policy of th...


















    That is exactly what they said in the years before the civil war.

    "Abraham Lincoln, speaking in 1858 reflected that "a house divided against itself cannot stand,"[1] stating that to be a unified nation, the United States would have to become all slave, or all free. Amid the emergence of increasingly virulent and hostile sectional ideologies in national politics, the collapse of the old Second Party System in the 1850s hampered efforts of the politicians to reach yet one more compromise. The compromise that was reached (the Kansas-Nebraska Act) outraged too many northerners. In the 1850s, with the rise of the Republican Party, the first major party with no appeal in the South, the industrializing North and agrarian Midwest became committed to the economic ethos of free-labor industrial capitalism. In 1860, the election of Abraham Lincoln, whom slave owners could not abide even though he had married into a slave owning family, finally triggered Southern secession from the union."

    Sounds like Red State/Blue State to me

    "Wendell Phillips, one of the most ardent abolitionists, attacked the Slave Power and presaged disunion as early as 1845:

    The experience of the fifty years… shows us the slaves trebling in numbers—slaveholders monopolizing the offices and dictating the policy of the Government—prostituting the strength and influence of the Nation to the support of slavery here and elsewhere—trampling on the rights of the free States, and making the courts of the country their tools. To continue this disastrous alliance longer is madness.… Why prolong the experiment?[4]"

    Sounds like business "buying out" the senate and congress does it not?

    "Convinced that Northern society was superior to that of the South, and increasingly persuaded of the South's ambitions to extend slave power beyond its existing borders, Northerners were embracing a viewpoint that made conflict likely; but conflict required the ascendancy of the Republican Party. The Republican Party — campaigning on the popular, emotional issue of "free soil" in the frontier — captured the White House after just six years of existence."

    Sounds a lot like our current battle between having more government programs or less government programs now.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    "# The social and psychological burdens of the many wars of the 18th century, which in the era before the dawn of nationalism were exclusively the province of the monarchy. The social burdens caused by war included the huge war debt, made worse by the monarchy's military failures and ineptitude, and the lack of social services for war veterans.
    # A poor economic situation and an unmanageable national debt, both caused and exacerbated by the burden of a grossly inequitable system of taxation.
    # The Roman Catholic Church, the largest landowner in the country, which levied a harsh tax on crops known as the dîme. While the dîme lessened the severity of the monarchy's tax increases, it nonetheless served to worsen the plight of the poorest who faced a daily struggle with malnutrition.
    # The continued conspicuous consumption of the noble class, especially the court of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette at Versailles, despite the financial burden on the populace.
    # High unemployment and high bread prices, causing more money to be spent on food and less in other areas of the economy;
    # Widespread famine and malnutrition, which increased the likelihood of disease and death, and intentional starvation in the most destitute segments of the population during the months immediately before the Revolution. The famine extended even to other parts of Europe, and was not helped by a poor transportation infrastructure for bulk foods. (Some researchers have also attributed the widespread famine to an El Niño effect.).[1]"

    French Revolution reasons, doesn't sound familier to today's problems in the US? Elitist class, dwindling middle class, growing poor class, excessive government debt, future high tax burden, and housing troubles. All we are missing is one major problem that causes food or money problems to strike a spark.

    History always repeats itself. To think that a civilization is above revolution is one of the precursers to it occurring.
    (more)
  • Tiff jackror... 2007/10/18 00:28:41
    Tiff
    +1
    hahahahahahahaha
    I'm not saying that a civilisation is above revolution. Empires fall when they get so big that they collapse on themselves. It happened to Rome, it happened to England and it will happen to America. Too many countries hate America for it not to happen. But if you're suggesting that it's going to happen through civil war...I can't believe you actually compared the lower class of your country to slaves. Do you have any idea how spoiled you sound. Buddy, save the tears for a country that actually needs them. Instead of comparing your country to what it should be, compare it to the rest of the world.

    Article 1

    Sex-slave trade flourishes in Thailand
    'I am but one brick in that long … wall of female exploitation and misery'

    -----------------------------...
    Posted: February 3, 2002
    1:00 a.m. Eastern


    By Anthony C. LoBaido
    © 2002 WorldNetDaily.com


    BANGKOK, Thailand – The pop music blares from the speakers situated on the steamy and seedy Patpong Road: "One night in Bangkok and the world's your oyster."

    "Oh, that is so '80s," says Mylee, a pretty 24-year-old Thai prostitute from the city of Chiang Rai in Northern Thailand. Mylee has perfect teeth, long, flowing jet-black hair and a graceful manner that belies her social status. She once studied to bec...











































































































    hahahahahahahaha
    I'm not saying that a civilisation is above revolution. Empires fall when they get so big that they collapse on themselves. It happened to Rome, it happened to England and it will happen to America. Too many countries hate America for it not to happen. But if you're suggesting that it's going to happen through civil war...I can't believe you actually compared the lower class of your country to slaves. Do you have any idea how spoiled you sound. Buddy, save the tears for a country that actually needs them. Instead of comparing your country to what it should be, compare it to the rest of the world.

    Article 1

    Sex-slave trade flourishes in Thailand
    'I am but one brick in that long … wall of female exploitation and misery'

    -----------------------------...
    Posted: February 3, 2002
    1:00 a.m. Eastern


    By Anthony C. LoBaido
    © 2002 WorldNetDaily.com


    BANGKOK, Thailand – The pop music blares from the speakers situated on the steamy and seedy Patpong Road: "One night in Bangkok and the world's your oyster."

    "Oh, that is so '80s," says Mylee, a pretty 24-year-old Thai prostitute from the city of Chiang Rai in Northern Thailand. Mylee has perfect teeth, long, flowing jet-black hair and a graceful manner that belies her social status. She once studied to become a veterinarian at a Thai university, but the 1997 Asian financial meltdown forced her family into bankruptcy and destitution.

    For Mylee, life – as it is for so many Thai women – is anything but a fairytale, yet her lot is better than many of the women and children caught in the no-man's land of Southeast Asia's human-flesh trade. It is a trade that includes not only sex, but pedophilia, human slavery and even organ harvesting.

    "It's a terrible situation," Mylee told WorldNetDaily. "It seems at times as though there isn't a single decent man left in the world. I thought that men were supposed to protect women and children, not exploit them. Even the men in the white hats sometimes are hiding black hats and even blacker hearts underneath."

    Mylee's point is underscored by the fact that a Thai police lieutenant colonel from Lumpini recently was charged with the repeated rape of a 12-year-old girl. The officer faces 20 years in jail. In response to increased crimes against children, Thailand's Cabinet recently endorsed a plan to recognize international laws established by the Hague convention on child abduction, child-related crime and adoption.

    "People are bought and sold – children, too," Mylee said over a meal.

    "Phom dii-chan kin jeh," she said sheepishly. "I am a vegetarian." Mylee spoke while sitting down for a plate of "yam wun sen," a kind of noodle salad.

    "Even the elephants don't have a place to go. They are Thailand's national symbol, and we don't have a game reserve for them. I love animals," she added.

    Mylee doesn't earn a great sum of money for her services, but what she does manage to save helps her family back in Chiang Rai.

    "I have three little sisters, and if it weren't for this, they wouldn't eat. I worry about AIDS. But you know, the sex trade is ancient. It goes back to the beginnings of human history. I am but one brick in that long, unbroken wall of female exploitation and misery."

    Why does she stay with the sex-trade game?

    "I can tell you that my body is hard currency," she explained. "Men want certain types of skin color, a compliant attitude. Submission and curves. But there aren't really any reasons anymore. There are only tears."

    Thai and other Southeast Asian women are popular with men seeking sex. The zoos of Patpong Road and Soi Cowboy in Bangkok's red-light district are filled with them. The light-skinned Thais from the north of the nation – ethnic Mongolians and Tibetans – are preferred over the darker-skinned girls from the ethnic Muslim and Malay south. Indo-Aryan women are too thin for most men, which precludes sex slaves coming to Thailand from poor countries like Bangladesh. In India, exotic women from the Himalayas are brought to Calcutta and other cities for their own perceived standout qualities. Islamic nations like Malaysia (and to a much lesser extent, Hindu Nepal) officially frown on the sex trade in Asia, while "Christian" and Buddhist nations like the Philippines and Thailand tend to turn a blind eye to it.

    Though nations like Sweden have recently refused to legalize prostitution, in Thailand it is a sort of national pastime on the scale of Amsterdam. When the transnational military exercise Cope Tiger 2002 brought 1,100 foreign troops to Thailand – including many American soldiers – the Thai government's Interior Ministry enacted special legislation to help the soldiers enjoy Thailand's sex industry. The 2 a.m. closing time for most bars was extended, and sex workers and others involved in the industry were warned against raising prices.

    "Don't feel sorry for me. Feel sorry for the children, for they are most at risk," Mylee said.

    Indeed, child rape, an epidemic in South Africa, is spreading like a wildfire into Southeast Asia. Cambodia's child sex slave industry is globally famous. In communist Vietnam, over 3,500 child rape cases have appeared in courts since 1998. The Vietnamese government has released figures showing that in some regions of the nation, between half and 90 percent of sexual crimes and abuse occur against minors.

    Throughout Southeast Asia, it is estimated that some 300,000 women and children are involved in the sex trade. They work in border towns between Burma and China, or even on the streets of Bangkok. Some are ethic Chinese nationals seeking a better life in Southeast Asia. They have no money, and many have lost their families – or have been sold off by them. They march through malaria-infested jungles in Laos and Burma and then ride in cramped vans into Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. There pimps and other shady characters bargain for their ownership and services (between $2,000-$4,000, say Thai authorities), while expecting nothing less than full allegiance. Some women will be traded as much as seven to 10 times between pimps and criminal gangs.

    Dr. Marcel de Boer, a Dutch physician with the French group Medicine Sans Frontiers told WorldNetDaily that he often confronts women and child sex rings during his travels around the Laotian, Cambodian and Burmese countrysides.

    "Make no mistake. This is human slavery. The pimps are animals, but they are smart. The whole operation – at least what I can see of it – is run with a kind of military-style precision that's scarcely believable," de Boer said.

    "Some of the women are just outright kidnapped. Some are sold off by their parents and relatives. Some are orphans. The lucky ones will find work on farms and perhaps in factories. Most of them – especially the pretty ones – will be trapped in the sex trade. It is a known fact that the most light-skinned and exotic of these girls will be shipped as far away as Tokyo and Cape Town."

    For Mylee, it appears that there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

    "I had such dreams," she laments. "I wanted to devote my life to helping to save all of Thailand's elephants. I wanted to help all animals, but now I am treated like one. If you pray, remember Mylee in your prayers."


    Article 2

    A NATION CHALLENGED: SURVIVAL; Children as Barter in a Famished Land
    Print Single-Page Save Share
    Del.icio.usDiggFacebookNewsvi... BARRY BEARAK
    Published: March 8, 2002
    Haunted by want, depleted from hunger, Akhtar Muhammad first sold off his few farm animals and then, as the months passed, bartered away the family's threadbare rugs and its metal cooking utensils and even some of the wooden beams that held up the hard-packed roof of his overcrowded hovel.

    But always the hunger outlasted the money. And finally, six weeks ago, Mr. Muhammad did something that has become ruefully unremarkable in this desperate country. He took two of his 10 children to the bazaar of the nearest city and traded them for bags of wheat.

    Gone now from his home are the boys, Sher, 10, and Baz, 5. ''What else could I do?'' the bereft father asked today in Kangori, a remote hamlet in the mountains of northern Afghanistan. He did not want to seem uncaring. ''I miss my sons, but there was nothing to eat,'' he said, casting a glance sideways to prove that his misery was hardly unusual.

    In the nearby foothills, enfeebled people were coming back from foraging wild spinach and even blades of grass -- a harvest of hideously bitter greenery that can be made edible only if boiled long enough. ''For some, there is nothing else,'' Mr. Muhammad muttered.

    Afghanistan, cradle of tragedy, is now in its fourth year of drought, and with the drought has come its inevitable offspring, famine. The hungry, spiraling deathward, try to cope in pitiable ways, selling all, eating fodder, wandering away to beg.

    Yet a measure of solace accompanies the abundance of despair. Last fall, when American bombing raids hindered emergency food deliveries, humanitarian groups were concerned about mass starvation. As winter comes to a close, the famine has not proved as lethal as feared, leaving millions in the vicinity of the grave without quite pushing them in.

    Article 3

    Poverty's Tragic Price
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    Del.icio.usDiggFacebookNewsvi... March 15, 2002

    To the Editor:

    ''Children as Barter in a Famished Land'' (front page, March 8) recounted the unspeakable misery of Afghan boys sold by their starving families -- a tragedy of poverty and war. But the article barely mentions girl-selling, only observing the practice of selling young girls into marriage.

    Translation: forced labor and sexual slavery.

    Taliban and mujahedeen factions also engage in sex-trafficking of women and girls without even bothering to disguise it as marriage.

    Child-selling to people who use children for sex and/or labor is a worldwide and domestic problem.

    Refugees fleeing Afghanistan report countless girls and women sold by their families or kidnapped.

    We need a public spotlight on this global problem, stronger antitrafficking laws and foreign aid to alleviate the poverty that exacts such a terrible price.

    KIM GANDY
    President
    National Organization for Women
    Washington, March 13, 2002

    Article 4

    While it is true that the majority of Americans care little about Sudan, a small number care deeply, in part because the country presents such stark issues: Famine, drought and endless aid. Arabs in the north warring with Christians in the south. Slavery and its morally snarled question of self-styled ''redeemers'' buying humans back.

    And so Sudan is becoming that rarity in American foreign policy: an African nation with a grass-roots constituency, however small. American schoolchildren raising money to free people for $50 to $100 apiece. Christian-right allies in Congress worried about the Islamic threat finding common ground with black legislators concerned about slavery. Officials of various aid agencies meeting with Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright to plead for a new course on Sudan.

    Article 5

    According to a broader definition used by Kevin Bales of Free the Slaves, another advocacy group linked with Anti-Slavery International, there are 27 million people (though some put the number as high as 200 million) in virtual slavery today, spread all over the world (Kevin Bales, Disposable People). This is, also according to that group:

    The largest number of people that has ever been in slavery at any point in world history.
    The smallest percentage of the total human population that has ever been enslaved at once.
    Reducing the price of slaves to as low as US$40 in Mali for young adult male laborers, to a high of US$1000 or so in Thailand for HIV-free young females suitable for use in brothels (where they frequently contract HIV). This represents the price paid to the person, or parents.
    This represents the lowest price that there has ever been for a slave in raw labor terms — while the price of a comparable male slave in 1850 America would have been about US$1000 in the currency of the time (US$38,000 today), thus slaves, at least of that category, now cost one thirtyeighth of their price 150 years ago, although this does not refer to the price of an 1850 slave in Africa.
    As a result, the economics of slavery is stark: the yield of profit per year for those buying and controlling a slave is over 800% on average, as opposed to the 5% per year that would have been the expected payback for buying a slave in colonial times. This combines with the high potential to lose a slave (have them stolen, escape, or freed by unfriendly authorities) to yield what are called disposable people — those who can be exploited intensely for a short time and then discarded, such as the prostitutes thrown out on city streets to die once they contract HIV, or those forced to work in mines.

    Although outlawed in most countries today slavery is, nonetheless, practiced in secret in many parts of the world — with outright enslavement still taking place in parts of Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.[21]

    There are three general types of slavery today: wage slaves, contract slaves, and slaves in the traditional sense.

    Wage slavery is most common in underdeveloped areas, where employers can afford to employ people at low wages, knowing they can't afford to risk their employment. Most child laborers can be considered to be wage slaves.
    Contract slaves are generally poor, often illiterate, people who have been tricked into signing contracts they do not understand.
    Slavery in its traditional sense is still very active; only its activities are carried out underground. Actual slavery is still carried out much the same way it has been for centuries: people, often women and children, are abducted (usually from an underdeveloped country such as in the Middle East, South America, Africa and the former Soviet Bloc countries), loaded aboard a ship and smuggled to a foreign country (usually Asia or the Middle East) and they are sold, the men and male children sold for labor, while the women and girls for domestic slavery or to work as unwilling prostitutes primarily in the West.
    (more)
  • jackror... Tiff 2007/10/19 13:02:42
    jackrorabbit
    And surprise, I agree with you. I am just saying to read the writing on the wall. Voters here feel disenfranchised, and that leads to revolution. There is still time to fix it, but not unless our government is willing to do it. Our leaders are writing treaties with Mexico and Canada for an eventual "Euro" style economy. The Canadian Prime Minister just came out for a vote to support this treaty. I can't find the article, but I heard it on the news.
  • jackror... Tiff 2007/10/19 13:09:24 (edited)
    jackrorabbit
    Found it.
    http://www.wnd.com/news/artic...

    I agree with your statement of how good we have it here. But just because we have it so good, doesn't make it less likely for disenfranchised voters to revolt against their government that wont do what we send them to D.C. to do.

    "Every nation has a right to govern itself internally under what forms it pleases, and to change these forms at its own will; and externally to transact business with other nations through whatever organ it chooses, whether that be a King, Convention, Assembly, Committee, President, or whatever it be. The only thing essential is, the will of the nation." --Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Pinckney, 1792.

    "[The people] are in truth the only legitimate proprietors of the soil and government." --Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1813.

    "We think experience has proved it safer for the mass of individuals composing the society to reserve to themselves personally the exercise of all rightful powers to which they are competent and to delegate those to which they are not competent to deputies named and removable for unfaithful conduct by themselves immediately." --Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1816.

    "Our fellow citizens have been led hoodwinked from their principles by a most e...



















    Found it.
    http://www.wnd.com/news/artic...

    I agree with your statement of how good we have it here. But just because we have it so good, doesn't make it less likely for disenfranchised voters to revolt against their government that wont do what we send them to D.C. to do.

    "Every nation has a right to govern itself internally under what forms it pleases, and to change these forms at its own will; and externally to transact business with other nations through whatever organ it chooses, whether that be a King, Convention, Assembly, Committee, President, or whatever it be. The only thing essential is, the will of the nation." --Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Pinckney, 1792.

    "[The people] are in truth the only legitimate proprietors of the soil and government." --Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1813.

    "We think experience has proved it safer for the mass of individuals composing the society to reserve to themselves personally the exercise of all rightful powers to which they are competent and to delegate those to which they are not competent to deputies named and removable for unfaithful conduct by themselves immediately." --Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1816.

    "Our fellow citizens have been led hoodwinked from their principles by a most extraordinary combination of circumstances. But the band is removed, and they now see for themselves." --Thomas Jefferson to John Dickinson, 1801.

    "The revolution of 1800... was as real a revolution in the principles of our government as that of 1776 was in its form; not effected indeed by the sword, as that, but by the rational and peaceable instrument of reform, the suffrage of the people." --Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, 1819.

    "I am sensible that there are defects in our federal government, yet they are so much lighter than those of monarchies, that I view them with much indulgence. I rely, too, on the good sense of the people for remedy, whereas the evils of monarchical government are beyond remedy." --Thomas Jefferson to David Ramsay, 1787.

    "What country can preserve its liberties if its rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon and pacify them." --Thomas Jefferson to William Stephens Smith, 1787.

    "God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion... We have had thirteen States independent for eleven years. There has been one rebellion. That comes to one rebellion in a century and a half, for each State. What country before ever existed a century and a half without a rebellion?" --Thomas Jefferson to William S. Smith, 1787.

    "The commotions that have taken place in America, as far as they are yet known to me, offer nothing threatening. They are a proof that the people have liberty enough, and I could not wish them less than they have. If the happiness of the mass of the people can be secured at the expense of a little tempest now and then, or even of a little blood, it will be a precious purchase. 'Malo libertatem periculosam quam quietem servitutem.' Let common sense and common honesty have fair play, and they will soon set things to rights." --Thomas Jefferson to Ezra Stiles, 1786.

    "I hold it that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms are in the physical. Unsuccessful rebellions, indeed, generally establish the encroachments on the rights of the people, which have produced them. An observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions, as not to discourage them too much. It is medicine necessary for the sound health of government." --Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1787.

    "Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends [i.e., securing inherent and inalienable rights, with powers derived from the consent of the governed], it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." --Thomas Jefferson: Declaration of Independence, 1776.

    "As revolutionary instruments (when nothing but revolution will cure the evils of the State) [secret societies] are necessary and indispensable, and the right to use them is inalienable by the people; but to admit them as ordinary and habitual instruments as a part of the machinery of the Constitution, would be to change that machinery by introducing moving powers foreign to it, and to an extent depending solely on local views, and, therefore, incalculable." --Thomas Jefferson to William Duane, 1803.

    Just a few quotes from the writer of the Declaration of Independence.

    http://etext.virginia.edu/jef...
    (more)
  • Tiff jackror... 2007/10/19 23:12:28
    Tiff
    lol, I've been having panic attacks over the past couple of days because what I said was a bit too harsh.
    The only thing that I can think of, where Americans really have cause to be angry is with your health care system. It's shocking...but if this "revolution" is caused by anything else I'd want to roll up a newspaper and hit you all over the head. Plus,if the 'revolution' were to take place, I really, really doubt that it's going to be through war.
  • jackror... Tiff 2007/10/20 11:29:29
    jackrorabbit
    I take it you don't listen to talk radio then, because on a weekly basis, at least one person will call into Neil Boortz or Glenn Beck and ask them when it is time to take up guns and head to the capitol. There are currently secessionist movements in 26 states, now they are on a small scale, but they exist. Vermont senate wants to vote to secede. It is far more than just "Health coverage", that is actually one of the big problems. Government is over spending, and now they want to add more onto our plate, when they can't even keep roads and bridges under good repair. Pork barrel spending is out of control, and it is on both sides. Republicans got thrown out over spending, and now the democrats are doing the same thing. We keep telling D.C. what we want, and they listen(until they get elected), then they go back to the same old tricks.
  • Tiff jackror... 2007/10/20 11:42:18
    Tiff
    no. Shocking as it may seem, they don't play American radio all over the world. For good reason too. Nobody wants to listen to BS like that.

    If it ever happens, I will personally invite you to my home, so you can slap me over the head and sing 'I told you so'.

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