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Why is the media obsessed with Rodney King?

mac9 2012/06/18 00:33:09
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Do we not have more deserving people in our country to memorialize? You be the judge.



The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page







The Arrest Record of Rodney King
Rodney King's criminal history played a large role in the high-speed chase
that led to his arrest, in his controversial and violent arrest, and in
the trials that followed. King explained his decision to flee--at
a speed exceeding 110 mph--from CHP officers as resulting from a fear that
his arrest for speeding would lead to a revocation of his parole and a
return to prison: "I was scared of going back to prison and I just kind
of thought the problem would just go away." Sergeant Stacey Koon,
the supervising officer at King's arrest, concluded (correctly, it turned
out) from King's "buffed out appearance" that he was most likely an ex-con
who had been working out on prison weights--and assumed therefore that
he was a dangerous character. Finally, it was King's criminal history
that explained the decision of prosecutors to keep him off the witness
stand. If King testified, defense attorneys would be allowed to present
the jury with his record of arrests--a record that might influence their
deliberations.

Many of King's problems with the law stem from his serious drinking
problem. According to his parole officer, Tim Fowler, King "was a
basically decent guy with borderline intelligence....His problem was alcoholism."
(Cannon, p40.)


King's Trouble with the Law Prior to His Beating







July 27, 1987: According to a complaint filed by his wife,
King beat her while she was sleeping, then dragged her outside the house
and beat her again. King was charged with battery and pleaded "no contest."
He was placed on probation and ordered to obtain counseling. He never
got the counseling.

November 3, 1989: King, brandishing a tire iron, ordered a convenience
store clerk to empty the cash register. The clerk grabbed the tire
iron, causing King to fall backwards and knock over a pie rack. King
swung the rack at the clerk and fled the store with $200. King was
arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon, second-degree robbery,
and intent to commit great bodily injury. In a plea agreement, King
pleaded guilty to the robbery charge and the other charges were dropped.
He was sentenced to two years in prison, but was paroled on December 27,
1990.



The Arrest of Rodney King on March 3, 1991





March 3, 1991: After being seen speeding on the 210 freeway
by CHP officers, King led them on a chase at speeds estimated at up to
110 to 115 mph. When finally stopped, King refused requests to get
into the prone position and appeared to charge one of the officers.
He was beaten and arrested. King was charged with felony evading.
Charges were later dropped.
King's
3/3/91 Arrest Record



King's Trouble with the Law After March 3, 1991





May 11, 1991: King was pulled over for having an excessively
tinted windshield. Although King was driving without a license and
his car registration had expired, King was not charged.

May 28, 1991: King picked up a transvestite prostitute
in Hollywood who happened to be under surveillance by LAPD officers.
King and the prostitute were observed in an alley engaging in sexual activity.
When the prostitute spotted the officers, King sped away, nearly hitting
one of them. King later explained that he thought the vice officers
were robbers trying to kill him. No charges were filed.

June 26, 1992: King's second wife reported to police that
King had hit her and she feared for her life. King was handcuffed
and taken to a police station, but his wife then decided against pressing
charges.

July 16, 1992: King was arrested at 1:40 A.M. for driving
while intoxicated. No charges were filed.

August 21, 1993: King crashed into a wall near a downtown Los
Angeles nightclub. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.19. King
was charged with violating his parole and sent for sixty day to an alcohol
treatment center. He was also convicted on the DUI charge and ordered
to perform twenty days of community service.

May 21, 1995: King was arrested for DUI while on a trip
to Pennsylvania. King failed field sobriety tests, but refused to
submit to a blood test. He was tried and acquitted.

July 14, 1995: King got into an argument with his wife
while he was driving, pulled off the freeway and ordered her out of the
car. When she started to get out, King sped off, leaving her on the
highway with a bruised arm. King was charged with assault with a
deadly weapon (his car), reckless driving, spousal abuse, and hit-and-run.
King was tried on all four charges, but found guilty only of hit-and-run
driving.

March 3, 1999: King allegedly injured the sixteen-year-old
girl that he had fathered out of wedlock when he was seventeen, as well
as the girl's mother. King was arrested for injuring the woman, the
girl, and for vandalizing property. King claimed that the incident
was simply "a family misunderstanding."

September 29, 2001: King was arrested for indecent exposure
and use of the hallucinogenic drug PCP.




LAPD
Officers' Trial Page

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  • ComeOnNow 2012/06/21 00:26:01
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    ComeOnNow
    What beats a king? 4 clubs and apparently a pool. RIP mr King. Rest In Pool
  • D D 2012/06/18 10:38:07
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    D D
    The two choices aren't too great. Anyway, Rodney was not a law abiding citizen. He had a record of run ins with the law. I am 45 and never been arrested. Rodney was not an upstanding American. He had an opportunity to help out his black community but he continued to do all the things that keep it like it is.
  • keymanjim 2012/06/18 01:18:53
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    keymanjim
    +1
    If it weren't for King we would be suffering through obama.
    The riots that occurred due to the acquittal of the cops that bet him showed what happens when minorities feel they are being mistreated.
    If obama was disqualified to run for the office of the President due to what would have been a misunderstood reason such as not being a natural born citizen, you would have seem riots similar to the 1991 LA riots.

    Except, they would have occurred all over the country.

    Even today, judges are so afraid of such an outcome that they continually ignore overwhelming evidence against obama and allow him to stay in office.
  • Rusty Shackleford 2012/06/18 00:45:52
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    Rusty Shackleford
    +1
    King was a hero to the democrats.
  • ed 2012/06/18 00:44:05
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    ed
    +1
    We can now look forward to a Rodney King day maybe a statue or two ,I see Rodney King streets in the picture,books ,movies maybe even a hamburger named after him.
  • mac9 2012/06/18 00:40:34
    Cnn and others cannot report Obama success
    mac9
    +1
    Nuff said.
  • I. Car Rus 2012/06/18 00:38:41
    Thugs have become heros to the media
    I. Car Rus
    +1
    "Can't we all just get along?"

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