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Why is it so hard for Liberals to understand that America was and is supposed to be a Christian Nation?

Genesis18:19 2013/09/13 19:56:48
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The Founding Fathers believed in the Bible, and wanted our country to follow in the footsteps of the Christian Settlers.
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  • flaca BN-0 2013/09/13 20:04:17
    Other
    flaca BN-0
    +17
    Why is it so hard for people to read what the founding fathers said about the fact that America was not founded on any religion, Christian or otherwise. It's all out there, the quotes, the speeches, the writings.

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  • ladyvoldemort 2013/09/14 12:08:31
    Other
    ladyvoldemort
    +6
    You're wrong. America is a secular country that happens to have a Christian majority. If you want a theocracy, move to Iran.
  • SABLE 2013/09/14 12:05:44
    Other
    SABLE
    +2
    Alot more Liberals are Christian than Conservatives at least active Christians. God said "Help one an other". Conservatives believe in helping themselves and the rich 1% of the country.
  • Bun SABLE 2013/09/15 05:22:28
    Bun
    Good Answer!
  • Lady Whitewolf 2013/09/14 09:53:52
    Other
    Lady Whitewolf
    +7
    BECAUSE YOU ARE WRONG.
  • Swamp Wizard 2013/09/14 09:24:47
    Other
    Swamp Wizard
    +5
    Because you're wrong
  • Brian ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮ 2013/09/14 08:00:52
    Other
    Brian ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +5
    If it was, god and Jesus would have been written into the constitution somehow...they weren't.
  • ❤ ~ elly ~ ❤ 2013/09/14 07:37:12 (edited)
    Other
    ❤ ~ elly ~ ❤
    +7
    It wasn't.

    Separation of Church and Government.
    founding fathers religion quote
  • Doc. J 2013/09/14 07:16:27 (edited)
    Other
    Doc. J
    +3
    Because it was not meant to be one, and it is not one.
    The founders EACH had their own beliefs and NONE of them wanted to make this country as a "Do as I do" sort of place.
    They created it as a "Do as you will" sort of place.

    When will you christians realize that, and just accept it?
  • Colsophnel 2013/09/14 07:07:21
    Other
    Colsophnel
    +3
    "Freedom of religion"? I'm Christian but even I see your question as naïve regarding the Founding Fathers.
  • Trish 2013/09/14 06:11:26
    Other
    Trish
    +3
    Because it's not.
  • The Aging Yankee Liberal Do... 2013/09/14 06:04:47 (edited)
    Other
    The Aging Yankee Liberal Douche
    +9
    Eh.... No it wasn't? We never were a theocracy, and never will be. Even our forefathers didn't include "under god" in the pledge.
  • Bun The Agi... 2013/09/15 05:23:29
    Bun
    TRUE!
  • jubil8 BN-0 PON 2013/09/14 05:49:03
  • whipnet 2013/09/14 05:35:42
    Other
    whipnet
    +4
    "The Founding Fathers believed in the Bible, and wanted our country to follow in the footsteps of the Christian Settlers."

    Show me where you get your facts. Thank you.

    *
  • William Gill~PWCM~JLA 2013/09/14 05:32:41
    Other
    William Gill~PWCM~JLA
    +3
    While most of the founders believed that for American to work it would take faith in God and the blessing of God they also knew that when it came to religion its a personal choice and religion of any kind should not be forced on anyone by the Federal Government.
  • ghostrider 2013/09/14 05:06:34
    Other
    ghostrider
    +4
    It's difficult to think of a more erroneous concept.
  • Moose 2013/09/14 03:46:28
    Other
    Moose
    +6
    First of all, there are liberals who are Christian. Second, "religious freedom" does not mean free to be any kind of Christian. Finally, being hard on anyone whom you think is different from you, is anything but Christian.
  • whipnet Moose 2013/09/14 05:37:10
    whipnet
    +1
    Agreed. There are also conservative atheist. :)

    *
  • reaper 2013/09/14 02:49:14
    Other
    reaper
    +11
    because it's not. they wanted it to be secular because they knew the problems of a single faith having control. and christianity's history isn't all that kind either.

    secular problems faith christianitys history
  • Natalie reaper 2013/09/14 12:39:07
    Natalie
    Where did you get that picture from? What is it called? Tell me! :)
  • reaper Natalie 2013/09/14 19:57:35
    reaper
    i found it on reddit awhile back. wasn't really a name for it that I remember.
  • RogerCoppock 2013/09/14 02:43:07
    Other
    RogerCoppock
    +9
    Because American is not a Christian nation.
  • mike 2013/09/14 01:55:36
    Other
    mike
    +11
    Are you talking about the Christian settlers who slaughtered the American Indians and stole their land?
  • remy 2013/09/14 01:30:40
    Other
    remy
    +8
    It's not hard, because that isn't true.
  • MrSpork 2013/09/14 01:30:07
    Other
    MrSpork
    +6
    Why do I as a Conservative not feel that people should follow religion like blind sheep. And that Politics and Religion are not one and the same thing.
  • BlytheSpirit~bn0 2013/09/14 01:28:31
    Other
    BlytheSpirit~bn0
    +12
    Why is it so hard for you to understand that it isn't. I suggest you read a little of Thomas Payne, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. You just might learn something.
  • Kidasha 2013/09/14 01:23:09
    Other
    Kidasha
    +5
    The founding fathers gave America freedom of religion.
  • kidkewlsgirl8888 2013/09/14 01:02:05
    Other
    kidkewlsgirl8888
    +2
    what do you live in the 1800's America is evolving.. you know that thing we did.. fear change fear it!!!!!! evolve
  • evangelism_vision 2013/09/14 00:19:50 (edited)
    Other
    evangelism_vision
    Depending on their age..... You have to remember, many of us who are baby boomers were taught U.S. History for the most part correctly. Beginning in the early part of the 1960's, the Hippies began to graduate and become teachers and professors, many ended up in politics.

    The National Teacher's Union that is Humanistic supported what has been known as the Humanist Manifesto and there was and still is a plan to change our History Books and change the view that most of us held in regards to the Founding Fathers and Capitalism, began to change

    But there is another reason too. Atheist do not want to acknowledge that the Founding Fathers were Godly men and that this Nation was founded on Christian principals because the very thought of "God" convicts men in their heart of sin.

    They have darkened hearts and they want all traces of "God" removed from both public School, and on to Crosses over servicemen's graves or on a Hill.

    One only has to look at other established Communist Countries to see that they are trying to do that here as well. If you want things to change, you must change the hearts of men. You will not receive any help from the Major Colleges and Public School Systems or the Unions because they are Liberal and they back Communist and Democrat individuals for office so that the Liberal Agenda will be continued.

    You must fight them with the power of the Constitution and include Prayer for divine intervention
  • Raithere evangel... 2013/09/14 01:59:27
    Raithere
    +4
    You have to remember, most of you baby boomers were raised on cold-war, anti-communist propaganda that sought to distinguish Stalinist Russia from the U.S.A. by characterizing us as a religious nation and demonizing them as god-less and immoral.

    Regardless of their personal religious beliefs, which varied, the Founding Fathers resoundingly and wisely decided to create a secular nation. The principle players in particular found the idea of a religious nation anathema. They believed that religion was an issue of personal conscience, not public policy or government.

    That being said, I do not agree with the legal efforts of some to abolish any expression of religion. There are places it does not belong but as long as no one is being excluded that does not include the public square
  • evangel... Raithere 2013/09/14 18:47:10
    evangelism_vision
    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their ****Creator***** with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.-

    So did America have a Christian Founding?

    In a new essay, Mark David Hall, a scholar of religion and the Founding, shows how the two most popular answers to the query—“Of course not!” and “Absolutely!”—distort the Founders’ views.

    Hall reminds fervent secularists that the Founders did not support a strict separation of church and state that requires political leaders to avoid religious language and public spaces to be stripped of religious symbols. And he cautions those who would succumb to an overly zealous Christian reading of the Founding by reminding them that the Founders did not create a theocracy and that they were, to a person, committed to protecting the religious liberties of all citizens, regardless of faith, so long as they “demean themselves as good citizens.”

    Hall does, however, recognize the influence that Christian ideas had on the Founders and identifies the three major areas of agreement with respect to religious liberty and church–state relations at the time of the Founding:
    Religious liberty is a right for all—Christian and non-Christian alike—an...



































    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their ****Creator***** with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.-

    So did America have a Christian Founding?

    In a new essay, Mark David Hall, a scholar of religion and the Founding, shows how the two most popular answers to the query—“Of course not!” and “Absolutely!”—distort the Founders’ views.

    Hall reminds fervent secularists that the Founders did not support a strict separation of church and state that requires political leaders to avoid religious language and public spaces to be stripped of religious symbols. And he cautions those who would succumb to an overly zealous Christian reading of the Founding by reminding them that the Founders did not create a theocracy and that they were, to a person, committed to protecting the religious liberties of all citizens, regardless of faith, so long as they “demean themselves as good citizens.”

    Hall does, however, recognize the influence that Christian ideas had on the Founders and identifies the three major areas of agreement with respect to religious liberty and church–state relations at the time of the Founding:
    Religious liberty is a right for all—Christian and non-Christian alike—and must be protected;

    The national government may not create an established church; and
    Religious references and appeals to God are appropriate in the public square.

    In short, while America did not have a Christian Founding in the sense of creating a theocracy, its Founding was deeply shaped by Christian moral truths. More importantly, it created a regime that was hospitable to Christians but also to practitioners of other religions.

    ********************* Let's Look at some History..... *************************

    Of course America had a Christian founding (when we began on this continent in the early 1600s), as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, David J. Brewer, documented in his book titled “the United States As A Christian Nation” (John C. Winston Co.,, 1905). As Brewer notes:

    The first colonial grant, made to Sir Walter Raleigh in 1584 authorized him to enact statutes for the government of the proposed colony provided that “they not be against the true Christian faith now professed by in the Church of England.” The first charter of Virginia, granted by King James I in 1606, commenced this grant invoked “the providence of Almighty God…in propagating the Christian religion to such people as yet live in darkness and miserable ignorance of the true knowledge and worship of God.” The Mayflower Compact of 1620 says that they the Pilgrims did what they did “for the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith.” And the charter of New England, granted by James I in 1620, expressed the “hope thereby to advance the enlargement of Christian religion, to the glory of God Almighty.”

    The Massachusetts Bay charter, granted in 1629 by Charles I, vows to “win and incite the natives of the country to their knowledge and obedience of the only true God and Savior of mankind, the Christian faith…[which] is the principle end of this plantation.” This declaration was substantially repeated in the 1991 Massachusetts Bay charter granted by William and Mary.
    The fundamental orders of Connecticut, under a provisional government instituted in 1638, stated that its purpose was “to maintain and preserve the liberty and purity of the gospel of our Lord Jesus which we now profess, also the discipline of the churches, which, according to the truth of the said gospel, is now practiced amongst us.” And the preamble of the Constitution of 1776 specifically says that among the things due to ever man in his place and proportion are “civility and Christianity.”

    In 1638 the first Rhode Island settlers organized a local government and agreed to “submit our persons, lives and estates to our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords and to all those perfect and most absolute laws of his holy word of truth, to be guided and judged thereby. Exod. 24:3,4; II Chron. 11:3; II Kings 11:17.” The 1663 Rhode Island charter speaks of its petitioners as “godly edifying themselves and one another in the holy Christian faith and worship as they were persuaded.” The charter of Carolina granted this same year by Charles II says its petitioners are “excited with a laudable and pious zeal for the propagation of the Christian faith.”

    In the preface of the frame of government prepared by William Penn in 1682 “the Lord from heaven” is mentioned as the “highest attainment” at which men on earth may arrive. And the laws prepared to go with this frame of government called for the keeping of the Sabbath Day as did “the primitive Christians…to worship God according to their understandings.”

    In the charter of privileges granted in 1701 by Penn to the province of Pennsylvania and its territories (later including Delaware):

    “Almighty God” is said to be “the only Lord of Conscience, Father of Lights and Spirits, and the author as well as object of all divine knowledge, faith and worship, who doth enlighten the minds and persuade and convince the understandings of the people.” Vermont’s 1777 Constitution also called for observance of the Sabbath and for “some sort of religious worship, which to them shall seem most agreeable to the revealed will of God.”

    The 1788 Constitution of South Carolina declared that:

    “the Christian Protestant religion shall be deemed and is hereby constituted and declared to be the established religion of this state: and “that the Christian religion is the only true religion; that the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testament are of divine inspiration, and are the rule of faith and practice.”

    Within 100 years of the landing at Jamestown Christians established three colleges:

    Harvard, William and Mary and Yale. The first seal used by Harvard read “In Christi Gloriam,” its charter saying that among its purposes was “through the good hand of God” to educate the English and Indian youth “in Knowledge latter observing: “But it would scarcely be asked of a court, in what professes to be a Christian land, to declare a law unconstitutional because it requires rest from bodily labor on Sunday (except works of mercy and necessity) and thereby promotes the cause of Christianity.”

    Commenting on all of this, Associate Justice Brewer says:

    “You will have noticed I have presented no doubtful facts. Nothing has been stated which is debatable.

    The quotations from charters are in the archives of the several States; the laws are on the statute books; judicial opinions are taken from the official reports; statistics from the census publications…I have said enough to show that Christianity came to this country with the first colonists; has been powerfully identified with its rapid development, colonial and national, and today (1905) exists as a mighty factor in the life of the republic.
    (more)
  • Raithere evangel... 2013/09/14 23:28:39
    Raithere
    "The quotations from charters are in the archives of the several States"

    I can also cite a list of quotations, including many from Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin who were the primary authors of the Constitution showing how they felt and why they decided against a Christian nation. I can show you quotations about what they thought of Christianity itself, which isn't very flattering overall.

    But all these quotations are irrelevant.

    I'm not saying that Christianity didn't play an influential and even a fundamental role in the founding of this nation. It did.

    The point is that the Founding Fathers were wise enough to create for us a secular nation.

    There really isn't anything to discuss or debate. You can provide all the quotations in the world, the fact remains that the issue did come up for debate during the Continental Congress, and quite a few delegates advocated to make this a Christian Nation. The suggestion was thoroughly rejected.

    The Founding Fathers were far too familiar with the tyranny that is created when one joins government with religion. The tyranny is the very reason many Christians came to America in the first place. They were far too wary to recreate the same situation here and they pointedly and deliberately rejected doing so despite the fact that most Americans at the time were Christian.
  • evangel... Raithere 2013/09/14 18:48:33
    evangelism_vision
    By the way, Have you ever read the MAYFLOWER COMPACT OF 1620 ?

    In that document, you will note why those people came to America
  • Raithere evangel... 2013/09/14 23:31:34
    Raithere
    Yes. And that is the exact reason they avoided creating yet another religiously founded Nation here. They were far too familiar with the tyranny of a religious government to repeat the same mistake they had just escaped from.

    You may say that Christians were fundamental to the founding of this nation, you may say that most of the people in this Nation are Christians, but you cannot say that this is a Christian Nation. It is not.
  • ☽✪☾Goddess~Worshiper☥ 2013/09/14 00:08:26
    Other
    ☽✪☾Goddess~Worshiper☥
    +9
    No, America is not a 'Christian nation'... America was founded ON religious freedom, BY Christians escaping persecution. There isn't any ruling religion in America...
  • Elephant Lord 2013/09/14 00:00:40
    Other
    Elephant Lord
    +15
    Because it's not. treaty of tripoli
    Now if you want a country which follows God, move to Iran.
  • Pete 2013/09/13 23:44:07
    Other
    Pete
    +1
    No Brains no head aches, no aspirin's required!
  • apaтнeтιc lycanтнrope 2013/09/13 23:41:49
    Other
    apaтнeтιc lycanтнrope
    +3
    The U.S. was never meant to be considered a Christian nation. Despite the religious views of our Founding Fathers, though personally I don't know what those views were, they declared this country to not be ruled by one religion.
  • Denver3344skippy 2013/09/13 23:23:57
    Other
    Denver3344skippy
    +4
    The nation was established to escape European Theocracies. I'm Christian but I think religion has no place in politics
  • sjalan 2013/09/13 23:06:12
    Other
    sjalan
    +8
    Because the Conservatives have and continue to misinterpret the English language from that time period. Further, they haven't read the US Constitution recently either. There is NO mention of any deity in the US Constitution, and based upon the 1st Amendment there should not be.

    Were the assumption that we are a Supposed "Christian Nation" then they WOULD have set up a THEOCRACY. But they DIDN'T !!! and that is the point.

    We are not a Theocratic Christendom Nation by DESIGN of the Founding Fathers.

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