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What's Wrong With ObamaCare? A Partial List from IBD

Ken 2012/07/01 23:05:18
IBD Editorials
















What's Wrong With ObamaCare? Here's A Partial List




Posted 06/29/2012 06:48 PM ET




















Repeal: After a full
day's reflection, we still feel that the ObamaCare ruling is an outrage.
And while we acknowledge that it's now settled law, we believe that
it's poor public policy and needs to be expunged from the books.


We're still nettled by the Supreme Court ruling that ObamaCare's
individual mandate can stand constitutionally as a tax when Congress
failed to define the penalty for failing to buy health insurance that
way. But we can do nothing about that. The court has spoken.


What we can do, with an eye toward repeal, is point out just how malignant the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is.


We began this exercise on Friday, when we wrote about ObamaCare's
hidden taxes. The law imposes at least 21 new or higher levies that will
cost trillions.
That's too much to demand of hard-pressed taxpayers.


New taxes aren't the only rising burden under ObamaCare. Far from being a law that will cut costs, it will increase them. [After
all, the 159 new boards and agencies (you read that right - 159!)
created by Obamacare will have to be fully staffed by a large cohort of
appointees, and as we all know federal employees don't come cheap.]



Yes, the president promised that his signature legislation would bend
the cost curve down. But when has a government program ever done such a
thing?


It won't happen with ObamaCare, though the president also swore that the legislation would not add to the federal deficit.


In March, the Congressional Budget Office said the law would cost
$1.76 trillion from 2013 to 2022, nearly double the $900 billion Obama
quoted in September 2009.
That's only a partial picture. Beginning in
2014, the next 10 years of ObamaCare — through 2023 — will cost more
than $2 trillion.


The
medical overhaul is also a choice killer. Many will recall Obama
promising that under his plan, "If you like your doctor, you will be
able to keep your doctor, period. If you like your health care plan,
you'll be able to keep your health care plan, period."


Those aren't the facts.


As we reported in April, the CBO estimates that as many as 20 million
Americans will be forced out of their plans as employers toss workers
into government health exchanges to avoid ObamaCare's costs.


A survey by McKinsey and Co. found that nearly one-third of employers
will likely to drop coverage for their workers once ObamaCare kicks in.


And an analysis by the Medicare actuary found that ObamaCare's
attacks on Medicare's private insurance options will force nearly 8
million seniors out of the coverage they've chosen.


So what else is wrong with ObamaCare? Try these:


• Consumer costs will rise. CBO says premiums will increase over the next decade faster than they did in the past five years.


• The Affordable Care Act is just the beginning. It's the door to a
single-payer government system run by a DMV-type bureaucracy. [ObamaCare is actually designed to put private insurance companies out of business - the "fines" to be paid by companies that don't provide health care benefits are much less than the cost of providing health care so most employers will opt to drop coverage, putting their employees onto public sector coverage.]


The quality of care will suffer. The Democrats' law will chill the
incentives to become a doctor, to create innovative drugs and to produce
live-saving and life-enhancing medical equipment. [Polling among doctors during the run-up to Obamacare passing indicate that over 40% of practicing physicians would consider leaving their practices if Obamacare is implemented.]


• Don't be surprised when treatment is rationed by government. As it
takes over a larger portion of health care — it already controls nearly
half — resources won't be able to keep up with demand. Somebody wins,
somebody loses based on someone else's whim. [If
you are over 70, or when you reach 70, forget about such niceties as pacemakers and
hip and knee replacements - you'll be given Obama's infamous advice:
"Take a pain pill!"]



There's much more that we've covered and will cover again. And it all
points to a single solution: Repeal the law before it takes deep root,
and replace it with policies that put the patient in charge.

Comment:
If you are an Obama supporter, ask yourself this question, "Was he
lying when he told us it would "only" cost $900 billion and that you can
keep your health care plan and your doctor, or is he just stupid and
didn't have a clue?" It has to be one or the other!







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Top Opinion

  • texasred 2012/07/01 23:25:19 (edited)
    texasred
    +5
    I think he didn't have a clue at first, but when people started reading the bill and the more information that came out, then he started lying. He's stupid because he listened to Reid and Pelosi (the stupid little dingbat that she is) and he's a lying SOB because that's part of his genetic make-up.

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  • Dan (Politicaly Incorrect) 2012/07/03 14:49:14
    Dan (Politicaly Incorrect)
    +1
    Here is another part of the bill that is not talked about. Obama's private Army:
    Sec. 5210 Establishishing a Ready Reserve Corp.
    Sec.203 of the Public Health Services Act. ( 42 U.S.C. 204)
    is ammended to read as follows:

    Sec. 203 Commissioned Corps and Ready Reserve Corps.
    (a) Establishment-
    (1) IN GENERAL - There shall be in the service a Commissioned Regular Corps for service in time of National Emergency.

    (2) REQUIRMENTS - All Commissioned Officers shall be Citizens of the United States and shall be appointed WITHOUT REGUARD to the Civil and Service Laws and Compensated without regard to the Classification Act of 1923, as Amended.

    (3) APPOINTMENT- Commissioned Officers of the Ready Reserve Corps SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT and commissioned officers of the Regular Corps SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT with the advise and consent of the Senate.

    (4) ACTIVE DUTY - Commissioned Officers of the Ready Reserve Corps shall at all time be subject to call to Active Duty by the Surgeon General including active duty for the purpose of training.

    (5) WARRENT OFFICERS - Warrant Officers may be appointed to the service for the purpose of providing support to the Health and Delivery systems maintained by the service shall be considered for the purposes of this Act a...











    Here is another part of the bill that is not talked about. Obama's private Army:
    Sec. 5210 Establishishing a Ready Reserve Corp.
    Sec.203 of the Public Health Services Act. ( 42 U.S.C. 204)
    is ammended to read as follows:

    Sec. 203 Commissioned Corps and Ready Reserve Corps.
    (a) Establishment-
    (1) IN GENERAL - There shall be in the service a Commissioned Regular Corps for service in time of National Emergency.

    (2) REQUIRMENTS - All Commissioned Officers shall be Citizens of the United States and shall be appointed WITHOUT REGUARD to the Civil and Service Laws and Compensated without regard to the Classification Act of 1923, as Amended.

    (3) APPOINTMENT- Commissioned Officers of the Ready Reserve Corps SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT and commissioned officers of the Regular Corps SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT with the advise and consent of the Senate.

    (4) ACTIVE DUTY - Commissioned Officers of the Ready Reserve Corps shall at all time be subject to call to Active Duty by the Surgeon General including active duty for the purpose of training.

    (5) WARRENT OFFICERS - Warrant Officers may be appointed to the service for the purpose of providing support to the Health and Delivery systems maintained by the service shall be considered for the purposes of this Act and Title 37 of the United States code, to be a Commissioned Officer within the Commissioned Corps of the Service.

    (b) Assimilating Reserve Corps Officers into the Regular Corps - Effective on the date of enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, All individuals classified as Officers in the Reserve Corps under this Section ( as such section existed on the day before the date of enactment of such ACT ) and serving on active duty shall be deemed to be commissioned officers of the Regular Corps.

    (c) Purpose and use of Ready Research
    (1) Purpose - The purpose of the Ready Reserve Corps is to fulfill the need to have additional Commissioned Corps personnel available on short notice (similar to the uniformed service's reserve program) to assist Regular Commissioned Corps Personnel to meet routine public health and emergency response missions.

    (2) The Ready Reserve Corps shall --
    (A) Participate in routine training to meet the general and specific needs of the Commissioned Corps;
    (B) Be available and ready for involuntary calls to active duty during National emergencies and public health crises; similar to the uniformed service reserve personnel;
    (C) Be available fro backfilling critical positions left vacant during deployment of active duty Commissioned Corps members, as well as for deployment to respond to public health emergencies, BOTH FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC; and
    '(D) be available for service assignment in isolated, hardship and medically underserved communities ( as defined in sec. 799B ) to improve access to health services.
    '(d) Funding- For the purpose of carrying out the duties and responsibilities of the Commissioned Corps under this section, the are authorized to be appropriated $5,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2010 through 2014 for recruitment and training and $12,500,000 for each fiscal years 2010 through 2014 for the Ready Reserve Corps.'.
    (more)
  • Mark P. 2012/07/02 02:42:49
    Mark P.
    +2
    I bet most of our representatives still haven't read it. Another Government fiasco in the making.
  • ladyjane 2012/07/02 02:06:10
    ladyjane
    +2
    How about this part of the Health-care bill?

    Verichip for HealthCare

    Copied from the Internet:

    "Buried deep within the over 1,000 pages of the massive US Health Care Bill (PDF) in a “non-discussed” section titled: Subtitle C-11 Sec. 2521— National Medical Device Registry, and which states its purpose as:

    “The Secretary shall establish a national medical device registry (in this subsection referred to as the ‘registry’) to facilitate analysis of postmarket safety and outcomes data on each device that—‘‘(A) is or has been used in or on a patient; and ‘‘(B) is a class III device; or ‘‘(ii) a class II device that is implantable.”

    In “real world speak”, according to this report, this new law, when fully implemented, provides the framework for making the United States the first Nation in the World to require each and every one of its citizens to have implanted in them a radio-frequency identification (RFID) microchip for the purpose of controlling who is, or isn’t, allowed medical care in their country
  • Ken ladyjane 2012/07/02 04:10:49
    Ken
    +1
    There are all sorts of "items" in the Obamacare bill that aren't related to health care, including taxes, IRS agents and tracking the buying and selling of gold.

    "Tucked away in the 2,300 page bill, in section 9006, is a provision that expands the scope of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 1099. Beginning Jan. 1, 2012, a Form 1099 will have to be filed to report to the IRS the purchase of all goods and services by small business and self-employed people that exceed $600 during a calendar year.

    "This is an onerous bookkeeping nightmare for all small businesses. But precious metals dealers will really take a hit.

    “Coin dealers not only buy for their inventory from other dealers, but also with great frequency from the public,”
  • ladyjane Ken 2012/07/02 04:43:57 (edited)
    ladyjane
    +1
    I wanted to know what right they had to have access to my bank account through electronic with-drawl... Things that have nothing to do with health-care are everywhere in this bill...
  • Ron in Oregon 2012/07/02 00:53:25
    Ron in Oregon
    +3
    I am 68 and in a knockdown fight with the IRS and so I need a job.
    I am planning on applying for a job with the IRS.
    Do you think they will need greeters at all the new IRS offices?
  • Ken Ron in ... 2012/07/02 04:11:44
    Ken
    +1
    I hear the bill authorizes 16,000 more agents to enforce the 'individual mandate!'
  • Rodney 2012/07/02 00:38:46
    Rodney
    +2
    And that is JUST what has been read and understood to date. As Nincompoop Nancy said, "we have to pass it so you can know what's in it". We are getting to know Nancy and we ain't a likin' what we learnin'!
  • Stacie 2012/07/02 00:16:54
    Stacie
    +3
    The much shorter list would be -

    What's right with Obamacare?
  • wtw 2012/07/02 00:12:03
    wtw
    +2
    Great info and there is so much more like the 4,000 new IRS agents.
  • gil vazquez 2012/07/02 00:01:43
    gil vazquez
    +1
    The lack of medical coverage in America is a serious problem as approximately 50 million people were uninsured all through 2010. But the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday ruled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was passed in 2010, was constitutional. The legislation, once implemented in its entirety, is expected to cover 30 million Americans currently lacking coverage.
    Advertise | AdChoices


    The lack of medical insurance has had grave consequences for individuals and the nation. In 2010 alone, 26,100 people died because they had no health insurance — that amounts to 502 preventable deaths a week. However, some states fared better than others. Based on the latest report by Families USA, a health care consumer advocacy group, 24/7 Wall St. identified the 10 states with the highest number of deaths per 100,000 people due to a lack of insurance.
    24/7 Wall St.: Eight states slashing local funding
    Not surprisingly, nearly all of the states with the most residents dying due to a lack of insurance also had high numbers of uninsured residents. Seven of the states on the list were among the 10 states with the highest percentage of people without health coverage. Seven of the states were also in the bottom 10 for the lowest rates of private insurance coverage.
    People wi...


















































    The lack of medical coverage in America is a serious problem as approximately 50 million people were uninsured all through 2010. But the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday ruled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was passed in 2010, was constitutional. The legislation, once implemented in its entirety, is expected to cover 30 million Americans currently lacking coverage.
    Advertise | AdChoices


    The lack of medical insurance has had grave consequences for individuals and the nation. In 2010 alone, 26,100 people died because they had no health insurance — that amounts to 502 preventable deaths a week. However, some states fared better than others. Based on the latest report by Families USA, a health care consumer advocacy group, 24/7 Wall St. identified the 10 states with the highest number of deaths per 100,000 people due to a lack of insurance.
    24/7 Wall St.: Eight states slashing local funding
    Not surprisingly, nearly all of the states with the most residents dying due to a lack of insurance also had high numbers of uninsured residents. Seven of the states on the list were among the 10 states with the highest percentage of people without health coverage. Seven of the states were also in the bottom 10 for the lowest rates of private insurance coverage.
    People without health insurance often forgo medical treatment for different reasons. According to Families USA, a supporter of President Obama’s health care reform law, uninsured adults are nearly four times more likely than insured adults to delay or avoid preventive care screening due to cost. Uninsured adults are also nearly seven times more likely to go without needed care due to cost than privately insured adults.
    “You still see a very, very strong correlation between uninsurance and poor health-care outcomes — including mortality — and [that is] because people aren’t getting the type of care that they need,” Kim Bailey, the research director for Families USA, told 24/7 Wall St.
    Many of the states with high death rates due to a lack of insurance also were among the poorest states in the country. The top seven states on this list also are among the 10 states with the highest poverty rates. Every state on this list is in the top half.
    Advertise | AdChoices


    Poor health also appears to play an important role. States with high death rates due to lack of insurance had a high percentage of people with lifestyle-related risk factors for poor health. Of the states on our list, five of them have among the 10 highest percentages of smokers and among the 10 lowest percentages of people who eat vegetables at least three times a day. Four have among the 10 highest proportions of overweight or obese adults. Seven states on the list were in the bottom 10 in terms of life expectancy.
    24/7 Wall St.: Countries that spend the most on health care
    Based on Families USA’s report, “Dying for Coverage: The Deadly Consequences of Being Uninsured,” 24/7 Wall St. identified the 10 states with the highest number of deaths from being uninsured per 100,000 residents. 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the methodology used by Families USA, first developed in 2002 by the Institute of Medicine, to determine excess mortality from being uninsured. This method considers the proportion of people who are insured and uninsured, the mortality risks for the uninsured and the number of expected deaths from a hypothetical fully insured population. 24/7 Wall St. also identified poverty rates and median income by state, provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Kaiser Family Foundation’s website — Statehealthfacts.org — provided health-related data, including life expectancy, obesity and diabetes rate.
    These are the 10 states dying for health coverage.
    1. Mississippi
    • Excess deaths from a lack of insurance (per 100,000): 15.82
    • Percent of population uninsured: 18.2 percent (ninth highest)
    • Percent living below the poverty line: 22.4 percent (tied for the highest)
    • Life expectancy at birth: 74.81 years (The lowest)
    Advertise | AdChoices


    Many residents of Mississippi cannot afford insurance. The state has the lowest median income in the nation and the highest percentage of residents living below the poverty line. As a result, Mississippi has the second-lowest percentage of residents with private health insurance coverage, at 56.49 percent. Exacerbating the problem, residents are especially unhealthy. Among all states, Mississippi has the second-highest obesity rate, the second-highest percentage of adults with diabetes and the fifth-highest percentage of adult smokers in the nation. Probably on account of both high uninsurance rates and poor personal health, Mississippi is the only state where life expectancy was below 75 years at birth in 2010. Mississippi’s excess death rate was the highest among all states and twice that of 28 states in 2010.
    2. Louisiana
    • Excess deaths from a lack of insurance (per 100,000): 14.94
    • Percent of population uninsured: 17.8 percent (10th highest)
    • Percent living below the poverty line: 18.7 percent (sixth highest)
    • Life expectancy at birth: 75.39 years (fourth lowest)
    Louisiana has one of the lowest life expectancies at birth in the U.S. at 75.4 years. Though much of this certainly can be attributed to poor health choices — the state has a higher number of smokers and its residents eat comparatively little fruit or vegetables — the inability of many residents to receive proper care due to lack of insurance is also a contributing factor. In Louisiana, 17.8 percent of the population goes without health insurance, despite the fact that 21.9 percent of the population qualifies for Medicaid — the fifth-highest proportion among all 50 states. The high uninsurance rate is partly due to the relative economic disadvantage of the state’s residents. With 18.7 percent of residents living below the poverty line — the sixth-highest rate in the nation — and a median income that is more than $5,000 lower than the U.S. average, just 58.39 percent of state residents have private insurance. That is the fourth-lowest such rate in the nation.
    Advertise | AdChoices



    3. Arkansas
    • Excess deaths from a lack of insurance (per 100,000): 13.49
    • Percent of population uninsured: 17.5 percent (tied for 12th highest)
    • Percent living below the poverty line: 18.8 percent (fifth highest)
    • Life expectancy at birth: 76.09 years (sixth lowest)
    According to the Council for Community and Economic Research’s ACCRA Cost of Living Index, Arkansas had the second-lowest cost of health care in the United States. However, with 18.8 percent of the population living below the poverty line and a median annual household income of just $38,307 — both among the lowest figures for any state — many Arkansans cannot afford private health coverage. As a result, just 58.78 percent of the population has private insurance, the sixth-lowest figure in the country.
    24/7 Wall St.: 10 brands that will disappear in 2013
    4. South Carolina
    • Excess deaths from a lack of insurance (per 100,000): 13.48
    • Percent of population uninsured: 17.5 percent (tied for 12th highest)
    • Percent living below the poverty line: 18.2 percent (seventh highest)
    • Life expectancy at birth: 76.57 years (ninth lowest)
    South Carolina is not a particularly healthy state: 67.4 percent of the state’s residents are either overweight or obese, just 23.3 percent eat proper amounts of fruit, only 22.9 percent eat proper amounts of vegetables and 10.7 percent are diabetic. All of these are among the highest rates in the country. Meanwhile, much of the cost of health care falls to private individuals. The state spent about $6,300 per person on health care in 2009, among the lowest levels, and just 51.9 percent of residents have employer-based health coverage. Unfortunately, South Carolinians have trouble affording insurance on their own: Median income was just $42,000 in 2010, significantly lower than the $50,000 national average, 18.2 percent of residents live below the poverty line and the cost of health care is higher than is the case in many states.
    Advertise | AdChoices


    5. New Mexico
    • Excess deaths from a lack of insurance (per 100,000): 12.15
    • Percent of population uninsured: 19.6 percent (sixth highest)
    • Percent living below the poverty line: 20.4 percent (tied for the highest)
    • Life expectancy at birth: 78.21 years (20th lowest)
    New Mexico has a fairly healthy population, with relatively low heart disease and obesity rates. However, just 55.8 percent of residents have private health insurance — the lowest rate of any state in the country. One possible reason is that few employers provide insurance — just 45.6 percent of the population has employer-based health coverage. The relative poverty of the state also means many residents cannot afford medical coverage. The median income in the state was just above $42,000 in 2010, far below the national median of about $50,000, while 20.4 percent of people live below the poverty line — the highest rate in the country.
    Click here to read the rest of 24/7 Wall St.'s analysis of states' death rates
    (more)
  • evangelism_vision 2012/07/01 23:45:03
  • evangel... evangel... 2012/07/01 23:45:52
  • Kane Fernau 2012/07/01 23:35:02
    Kane Fernau
    +1
    We are just like Cuba!
  • Obama Failed Soda Head Chie... 2012/07/01 23:30:36
    Obama Failed Soda Head Chief Opi
    +3
    Obama was a candidate for president, he endorsed universal health insurance, but opposed forcing individuals to buy their own insurance.

    As president, he signed into law a bill that violates both of these promises. The Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) gives the federal government the authority to tell every American what insurance they must have, where they will get it and what they will pay for it.

    Moreover, even as it violates another campaign promise ("if you’re in a plan you like, you can keep it"), the most optimistic estimate expects 23 million people will remain uninsured once the new health reform law is fully implemented.

    http://townhall.com/columnist...
  • texasred 2012/07/01 23:25:19 (edited)
    texasred
    +5
    I think he didn't have a clue at first, but when people started reading the bill and the more information that came out, then he started lying. He's stupid because he listened to Reid and Pelosi (the stupid little dingbat that she is) and he's a lying SOB because that's part of his genetic make-up.
  • Jackie G - Poker Playing Pa... 2012/07/01 23:16:01
    Jackie G - Poker Playing Patriot
    +4
    Vote the WH Liar out - no other way to solve this.
  • Ken Jackie ... 2012/07/02 04:15:28
    Ken
    +1
    You've got that right, and give the Republicans 60 senators while you're at it!

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