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What if Christianity is really just a myth... and the great Gnostic spiritual teachers, the Druid priests, and the shamanistic healers of Europe and North Africa were right all along

Feck Sodahed 2009/03/21 19:43:55
The Gaia Theory makes more sense than the Christin myth.
Blasphemy!  The Bible is the word of God...and not a conspiracy!
Only Darwin can explain the origins of humanity.
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Video: http://gnosticmedia.podOmatic.com/entry/2008-12-29T01_40_24-0...




Basing much of Not in His Image on the Nag Hammadi and other Gnostic writings, John Lamb Lash explains how a little-known messianic sect propelled itself into a dominant world power, systematically wiping out the great Gnostic spiritual teachers, the Druid priests, and the shamanistic healers of Europe and North Africa. They burned libraries and destroyed temples in an attempt to silence the ancient truth-tellers and keep their own secrets. But as Lash reveals, when the truth is the planet Earth it cannot be hidden or destroyed.

Not in His Image delves deeply into the shadows of ancient Gnostic writings to reconstruct the story early Christians tried to scrub from the pages of history, exploring the richness of the ancient European Pagan spirituality--the Pagan Mysteries, the Great Goddess, Gnosis, the myths of Sophia and Gaia--and chronicles the annihilation of this Pagan European culture at the hands of Christianity.

Long before the birth of Christianity, monotheism was an anomaly; Europe and the Near East flourished under the divine guidance of Sophia, the ancient goddess of wisdom. The Earth was the embodiment of Sophia and thus sacred to the people who sought fulfillment in her presence. This ancient philosophy was threatening to the emerging salvation-based creed of Christianity that was based on patriarchal dominion over the Earth and lauded personal suffering as a path to the afterlife.


Restoring Balance – Reclaiming our Spiritual Heritage

John Lash’s new book… Not in His Image… narrates the retrieval of the ancient roots of humanity’s religious experiences and its flowering through our sacred and mystical communion with the Earth, and he challenges the many millennium-old dehumanizing Savior-Victim belief system, inclusive of man’s domination over nature.

He states his primary objectives in the Introduction: “To recover Pagan wisdom and restore the Sophianic vision of the Mysteries and in correlating these teachings with Gaia theory and deep ecology, add a spiritual dimension.” His research and experiences are melded with numerous insightful references from the codices of antiquity to historians, cutting-edge biologists and astro-physics to deep ecology.

From a brilliant perspective, Mr. Lash unravels historical textural evidence exposing the cover-up, conspiracy and agenda behind the betrayal of humanity’s spiritual heritage. Principals, he informs, deviated by a political system in the guise of religion. A religion modeled primarily from patriarchal
domination; ignited by delusional beliefs, intimidation and the power of suffering; leaving in its wake a horrific legacy of conquest and conversion by violent force, suppression and hypocrisy. “Salvation history
mirrors the hidden workings of our most narcissistic, self-destructive impulses.”

The rising tide of victimization that accompanied these beliefs, diluted our ancestors confidence in continuing to cultivate and live from their life affirming values, body-based morality and imaginative visionary endowments.

His exposition cites evidence describing the source and motivation behind the tragic eradication of the Mystery Schools by these forces. 2000 years later, this “world-wrenching tragedy meets a fateful moment.” In 1947, the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered, providing what Mr. Lash refers to as “the ideological infrastructure of Christian religion.” In 1945 in the desert mountains, an Arab peasant found 13 volumes which were destined to become the Nag Hammadi Library. This choice cache was published in English in 1978 and reveals the other side of the story…rare writings including the Sophia Mythos and Pagan and Gnostic cosmology. Quoting from the book, “The message of the Gnostic revealers is theological semtex.”

While evoking the ambience of the Mystery sanctuaries, he quotes Walter Buckert, “Mysteries were initiation rituals of a voluntary, personal and secret character that aimed at a change of mind through experience of the Sacred.” “These schools were the universities of antiquity and their teachings were dedicated to the continuing consecration of the Earth as the Great Goddess – Sophia, whose unique wisdom is the living intelligence of the planet.” The Gnostic documents describes the lost creation myth of Sophia and how she became the body of our earth Gaia; about the Aeon Christos; about the Mesotes, the supportive intermediary to our self-guiding and self-correction and about instruction given by the Light.
The Mystery centers taught the arts of civilization, social organization, ecological ethics, language and writing skills.

The Gnostics spoke of the Anthropos, the genetic template of authentic humanity, “As a learning animal…free to err, correct and learn from our mistakes. Failing to own and evolve the intelligence innate to the species, we risk being deviated by another kind of mind, an artificial intelligence through which we become unreal to ourselves.”

He continues, “The Gnostics warned, the male-god fixation belies the preference for simulation over reality that is the primary risk of deviation for our species. We incur this risk through being exceptionally endowed with modeling and abstracting faculties. Preference for replication will come to the fore in human cerebral activity, taking on a life of its own, if not detected and kept within limits. Exposing and overcoming co-optive re-plication may be the spiritual challenge that decides the fate of Humankind.”(The origin of replication means to ‘hold back’.)

Within the last 30 years or so, “Western society has acquired a new spiritual dimension centered on the image of Gaia. The Gaia Hypothesis and deep ecology appeared in the world almost simultaneously.” Mr. Lash cites other converging links and feels hopeful that Gnosis will find its place within these movements, illuminating and deepening recognition of the intensive dimension of nature. He quotes Jeremy Narby, “How could nature not be conscious, if our own consciousness is produced by nature.”

Gaia-Sophia relies and waits for our awareness and communication of this reciprocal perception in our senses and telepathic resonance in our memory and thinking. So we might come to learn and understand
Gaia’s transhuman purposes and our contribution to Her correction.

“Loving Gaia is the highest calling of humanity.”
http://gardengaia.com/docs/Not-In-His-Image.pdf

THE GAIA THEORY
In science, a Gaia theory is a class of scientific models of the biosphere in which life fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by affecting Earth's environment. The first such theory was created by the English atmospheric scientist James Lovelock in 1969. He hypothesized that the living matter of the planet functioned like a single organism and named this self-regulating living system after the Greek goddess Gaia.
http://www.gaiatheory.org/
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Top Opinion

  • YourObamaUpdate.com 2009/03/21 21:46:41
    Undecided
    YourObamaUpdate.com
    +6
    It is not the core belief systems that are at fault because lets be honest... they are just words... the majority of people understand that God (by all his/her names) loves all his children unconditionally... it is those people which we tend to call extremists who pervert the word of God to meet their needs... choosing which passages to interpret literally and which to ignore... that is where the problem lies and always has... extremists pervert god meet choosing passages interpret literally ignore lies

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  • Kirra Blackhart... Now even... 2009/03/22 04:01:33
    The Gaia Theory makes more sense than the Christin myth.
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +2
    Considering most of christianity was borrowed and rewritten from the myths of pre-existing cultures, how is it any more relevant than any of the other religions? Even the basic idea of Monotheism was borrowed from Kemet and the worship of the God Aten.

    Even the bible states that we were made from dirt. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. We all come from Gaia, we all return to Gaia when we die.
  • Helmholtz Kirra B... 2009/03/22 04:53:47
    Helmholtz
    +1
    Would you mind giving some references? Not trying to be an ass or saying that you're speaking untruths, this just sounds like something I'd like to read more into (especially if the sources are respected scholars).
  • Kirra B... Helmholtz 2009/03/22 05:08:41
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +1
    1. The World's Saviors, by Charles Vail
    2. The Worlds Sixteen Crucified Saviors, by Kersey Graves
    3. The Golden Bough, by George Frazer.

    There is also plenty of information on the web these days too. Google the "Pagan origins of christianity". It is a popular topic these days.
  • thetruth 2009/03/22 03:51:50
    Blasphemy! The Bible is the word of God...and not a conspiracy!
    thetruth
    +2
    What if Jesus is real? what then ..?..
  • Feck So... thetruth 2009/03/22 03:56:54
    Feck Sodahed
    +3
    Jesus is probably real. But the religion that was created in his name is likely nothing like what he practiced. And the Bible is probably in large part...fabrications of his life.
  • thetruth Feck So... 2009/03/22 03:58:39 (edited)
    thetruth
    +3
    Thats your right not to believe it... But I believe other wise;)

    Blessings my friend ...
  • LVslotdoc Feck So... 2009/03/22 10:49:11
    LVslotdoc
    +2
    I can agree that some "religions" do not practice true Christianity. Those that don't, I might consider to be a cult, or at least mistaken in their fundemental beliefs. I don't consider myself to be religious. I have a relationship with God. I attend church, and I hear the pastor or other laymen give teachings, and share how they interpret what a particular context of the Bible is saying.

    I read and study the Bible myself, so if I agree with someone's interpretation, or feel it has merit, I will tell him so. If I do not agree with the interpretation, I am not afraid to go to him and say, "Well you know, I think you're full of shit." (That of course would be if I REALLY disagree.) And you have to be very careful when you accuse someone of misteaching the Scriptures of the Bible, because Biblical teachers are admonished to teach according to the leading of the Holy Spirit of God, and it is an unpardonable sin to blaspheme the Holy Spirit.

    The teachings of these "scholars" that you read appear to me to be the rantings of a few who want nothing more than to push God out of theirs, and other peoples lives. I would prefer to keep Him in mine. God bless you in your endeavors, my friend.
  • thetruth LVslotdoc 2009/03/22 19:43:27
    thetruth
    Well said my friend ;)

    Blessings ...
  • Kirra B... thetruth 2009/03/22 04:05:03
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +3
    Pascals wager has no effect on anyone outside of christianity.
  • Helmholtz Kirra B... 2009/03/22 04:57:13
    Helmholtz
    It didn't effect me even when I was a Christian ("What if Mohamad's revelation by Gabriel was real? What then?" etc.)
  • thetruth Helmholtz 2009/03/22 05:01:56
    thetruth
    +2
    Alrighty then ..........

    Peace and happiness ;)
  • herb Kirra B... 2009/03/22 14:08:38
    herb
    +1
    Well, that depends on if one takes a narrow interpretation of the Wager (that is, strictly Christian) or a broad one (that is, looking at the core beliefs of all religions and noting that they are pretty much the same, and living life to that standard).
  • Thanos ... thetruth 2009/03/22 13:04:24
    Thanos "In Darwin I trust"
    +3
    I believe that jesus (the man) existed. I just believe he was a man who was great and wanted everyone to live the way we should live. Sorta like buddah.
  • Feck So... Thanos ... 2009/03/22 14:26:33
    Feck Sodahed
    +3
    That's exactly what I think.
  • Hairles... Feck So... 2009/03/22 21:42:23
    HairlessKat the Gnostic
    +1
    yes,, and a roman tax collecter who NEVER met hiim,, took the message,, packaged it ,,built a 'bank/aka church' up for people to deposit their money into and the rest is history,, christianity was adopted by rome at a time when their gov was failing,, is this why america just went through? And what did we learn about that...
  • Feck So... Hairles... 2009/03/22 21:58:26
    Feck Sodahed
    +1
    Yep! LOL!
  • flaca BN-0 2009/03/22 03:27:02
    None of the above
    flaca BN-0
    +3
    nowadays it seems that a little more worship of the earth is sorely needed.
  • -sasman- 2009/03/22 03:06:22
    Undecided
    -sasman-
    +3
    When "pagans," people in general, worshiped many gods (sun, moon, sea, etc.) it was very difficult to "heard" them. When the idea of a monotheistic god came about, you can bet some "smarter than the average bear," types said, "Hey, we better get behind this, this is gonna' be BIG."

    The Council of Nicaea, which ratified the trinity, threw a couple of dissenters out for postulating that Jesus could not be God in the Ultimate sense, because he "came from something," so how could he be equal to the other two who always were?

    Those who didn't believe were banished, never to be heard from again. It's still happening today... Except for the interweb...
  • UrbanHillbilly 2009/03/22 02:16:11
    None of the above
    UrbanHillbilly
    +2
    You're pushing a false dicotemy. I have no love for what Christainity has become, but the teachings of Jesus are universally relevent. To understand what Christianity was, one need only understand what a cross is.
  • Feck So... UrbanHi... 2009/03/22 02:23:38
    Feck Sodahed
    +3
    How do you figure? The cross is much older than Jesus and Christianity. In fact...the use of the cross as a symbol was condemned by several churches in the 3rd century CE because of its Pagan origins.
  • UrbanHi... Feck So... 2009/03/22 02:41:42
    UrbanHillbilly
    +2
    The Roman cross was a machine with a very specific purpose. It was used to humiliate and kill those that did not submit to Rome. The sign of the cross is the ultimate symbol of defiance. The swastika and the Wheel of Life are also crosses, but have completely different origins and meanings. The cross is a symbol of liberation.

    What we hear from Christian circles today is, "a culture of life." It is the fear of death that gives terrorists and despots power. If one follows the Christ, one believes in justice and does not fear death or torture. Fear makes us slaves.

    Pagan beliefs focus on life. I see no reason for both systems of belief to coincide. This defines me as a "mystic."
  • myssabz 2009/03/22 01:59:59 (edited)
    Blasphemy! The Bible is the word of God...and not a conspiracy!
    myssabz
    +3
    No myth. No doubt. myth doubt
  • Maj. C. D. Hardy 2009/03/22 01:59:38
    None of the above
    Maj. C. D. Hardy
    +2
    Religion is a personal choice and no one has the market cornered on who is right or wrong, that is why freedom of religion is part of the first amendment of the constitution. Our founding fathers were wise enough to understand that we as a society will never be able to agree on which core religious belief system is correct so we are afforded the right to believe as we wish.
  • Dave Sa... Maj. C.... 2009/03/22 05:26:04
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    +2
    If you are right, then nobody is right. Freedom of religion is only useful if there is truth to be found in religion.
  • Maj. C.... Dave Sa... 2009/03/22 06:08:30
    Maj. C. D. Hardy
    +1
    Actually that is what I said no one is right, and also no one is wrong. It is a personal choice as to what you believe. Try as we may there will never be a consensus as to who's religion is correct. The only fair thing to do is agree to disagree and live and let live, which allows each of us to find our own individual truth in religion.
  • Dave Sa... Maj. C.... 2009/03/22 06:11:33 (edited)
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    +2
    It may be fair, and I agree with everyone's right to believe as they feel right, but it seems illogical to think that there is more than one ultimate truth.
  • Maj. C.... Dave Sa... 2009/03/22 06:22:55
    Maj. C. D. Hardy
    +1
    I agree there can only be one ultimate truth, but the problem is it will not be revealed to us during our life time. This is something that will reveal it's self when we become one with the ages. So until that time we all need something to believe in even if it turns out we were wrong. The only thing that all religions do agree on is that god or what represents god loves us all and accepts us in spite of all our faults as long as we embrace him or maybe her as our savior.
  • Dave Sa... Maj. C.... 2009/03/22 06:26:16
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    +4
    Is it ultimate truth that we cannot find the truth in our lifetime?
  • Dagon 2009/03/22 01:54:20
  • Feck So... Dagon 2009/03/22 02:04:11
    Feck Sodahed
    +4
    True! Except in the beginning... God was a woman :-)
    true god woman
  • Dagon Feck So... 2009/03/22 02:14:26
  • Kirra B... Dagon 2009/03/22 04:14:54
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +3
    The goddess is "firmament", she is Mother Earth. She is the living breathing being that she is all around us. Gaia is Mother Earth, she is our planet. Palaeolithic man called our planet female, because she gave life and sustenance to us, the same way a mother does.
  • Feck So... Kirra B... 2009/03/22 04:15:51
    Feck Sodahed
    +3
    Exactly!
  • Dagon Kirra B... 2009/03/22 14:15:48
  • Kev316 2009/03/22 01:47:08 (edited)
    None of the above
    Kev316
    +3
    Hmm... I imagine most here have seen this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    There are errors but the overall, pretty right on.

    Tricky question and a very good one I often ponder. What we have of the Canonical texts are from the fourth century. What we have of the Gnostic texts are of the first century. The Gnostics paint quite a different picture and have never been interfered with via translations and orthodoxy.

    'Christianity' is an Eastern religion and needs to be understood as such. Let us not forgot Christ spent a chunk of time in Egypt, if you believe the Canon. I imagine he made quite a few connections between the inherent divinity within men and women, as taught in the Eastern Mystery schools.

    The Magi were such folks. Why kill kids 2 and under? Took them 2 years to get there from the far east - they were taught by Daniel in Babylon to watch and wait (again, if you believe the Canon). They were part of Eastern mystical thought.

    India has a story of a God/man who healed folks and raised them from the dead. He had disciples, was crucified, and rose again on the third day. It predates Christ by 300 years. Egypt had a similar tale, Greece, Persia, Sumeria... Long list.

    I guess I can't answer. I'm too eclectic in my thinking and see how it all fits together saying t...
    Hmm... I imagine most here have seen this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    There are errors but the overall, pretty right on.

    Tricky question and a very good one I often ponder. What we have of the Canonical texts are from the fourth century. What we have of the Gnostic texts are of the first century. The Gnostics paint quite a different picture and have never been interfered with via translations and orthodoxy.

    'Christianity' is an Eastern religion and needs to be understood as such. Let us not forgot Christ spent a chunk of time in Egypt, if you believe the Canon. I imagine he made quite a few connections between the inherent divinity within men and women, as taught in the Eastern Mystery schools.

    The Magi were such folks. Why kill kids 2 and under? Took them 2 years to get there from the far east - they were taught by Daniel in Babylon to watch and wait (again, if you believe the Canon). They were part of Eastern mystical thought.

    India has a story of a God/man who healed folks and raised them from the dead. He had disciples, was crucified, and rose again on the third day. It predates Christ by 300 years. Egypt had a similar tale, Greece, Persia, Sumeria... Long list.

    I guess I can't answer. I'm too eclectic in my thinking and see how it all fits together saying the same thing. Love one another and in doing so, we love God in actual practice, not empty words.
    (more)
  • Dave Sa... Kev316 2009/03/22 05:29:19
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    +2
    The gospel was taught before Christ came, even in the Americas, so having an Indian story of Christ before He came in the flesh is not surprising to me.
  • Chuck 2009/03/22 01:45:25
    None of the above
    Chuck
    +4
    What if Christianity is right?God Bless.
  • Feck So... Chuck 2009/03/22 01:46:30
    Feck Sodahed
    +4
    Then good for you. I just don't believe it is right.
  • Kirra B... Chuck 2009/03/22 04:30:20
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +1
    Christianity may be "right" for you, but it may not be "right" for everyone else.
  • Carpe D... Kirra B... 2009/03/22 04:56:37
    Carpe Diem *In God I Trust*
    Gnosticism may be "right" for you, but it may not be "right" for everyone else.

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