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What happened to all the cavemen who died? Did they go to heaven? Are they allowed to go to heaven since they lived before Christ?

lynnie 2008/12/27 22:28:16
Yes they went to heaven, they had souls and were created by God.
No.  They cannot go to heaven, because they were created before Jesus redeemed the world
Undecided
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  • flaca BN-0 2008/12/28 00:14:59
    Who cares about Cavement?
    flaca BN-0
    +3
    it's chicken and egg
    and the cavemen do alright: they are under contract to Geico Insurance!

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  • petey 2009/11/17 22:09:24
    Undecided
    petey
    if they believed that GOd created them and did His will they would go to heaven. this is a pretty touchy issue because of the "Before Christ" factor. but if they truly believed in God and His will they would go to heaven
  • julie sossaman 2009/04/10 23:17:23
    No. They cannot go to heaven, because they were created before Jesus redeeme...
    julie sossaman
    realy dont know but thay would have just died i guess
  • divajinx 2009/01/10 19:45:57
    Yes they went to heaven, they had souls and were created by God.
    divajinx
    +1
    Some of us are still around! LOL

    Seriously tho, God created ALL mankind. God has been around forever. He created the cavemen (if you believe in Evolution). He created EVERYTHING! All humanity has a soul. The just don't all keep it pure.
  • driley 2008/12/31 07:22:43
    Undecided
    driley
    Cavemen weren't real. Okay, there may have been an occasional person from time to time who took up residence in a cave for one reason or another, but people have always been extremely resourseful at constructing homes of one kind or another.

    I trust God to know how to redeem people who never had a chance to be redeemed by Jesus.
  • KUDABUX driley 2009/01/17 03:40:46
    KUDABUX
    +1
    I believe the reference was to prehistoric people and there most certainly were cave dwellers:
    Cave Dwellers, term used to designate ancient people who occupied caves in various parts of the world. Cave dwellers date generally from the Stone Age period known as the Paleolithic, which began as early as 2.5 million years ago. Caves are natural shelters, offering shade and protection from wind, rain, and snow. As archaeological sites, caves are easy to locate and often provide conditions that encourage the preservation of normally perishable materials, such as bone. As a result, the archaeological exploration of caves has contributed significantly to the reconstruction of the human past.

    Wherever caves were available, prehistoric nomadic hunters and gatherers incorporated them into the yearly cycle of seasonal camps. Most of their activities took place around campfires at the cave mouth, and some caves contain stone walls and pavements providing additional protection from winds and dampness. Hunting, particularly of reindeer, horse, red deer, and bison, was important; many caves are situated on valley slopes providing views of animal migration routes
  • driley KUDABUX 2009/01/17 13:59:15
    driley
    +1
    Thanks KUDABUX. I think what you present here is the classic opinion of what early man. It's what I was always taught too. But since then I have been presented with evidence that "it aint necessarily so". We assume that human development has been from very primative on a gradual incline to very advanced today. There has been some (not a lot, to be sure) of evidence to support the idea that we started out very advanced and at times declined in certain locations (due most likely to human nature). This theory intrigues me, and is the one I based my answer on. I wonder if the caves were used for ceremonies, burial, storage, even a place to paint murals that wouldn't be weathered off quickly.

    I am of the opinion that mankind was created highly intelligent, highly capable, healthy, long lived and fully capable of building entire cities without the use of computers or even slide rules. As far as how many years ago, that can be debated until the cows come home, even among archaeologists, but it sure makes for a fun discussion.

    But hey, that's just my opinion. I appreciate yours too.
  • KUDABUX driley 2009/01/17 15:02:07
  • lynnie KUDABUX 2009/01/17 21:57:33
    lynnie
    +2
    Thank you !!!
  • flaca BN-0 2008/12/28 00:14:59
    Who cares about Cavement?
    flaca BN-0
    +3
    it's chicken and egg
    and the cavemen do alright: they are under contract to Geico Insurance!
  • Roundabout ~ Pepe is my soc... 2008/12/27 23:57:33
    Undecided
    Roundabout ~ Pepe is my sock puppet
    +1
    No one knows. Christianity and God weren't invented yet, at least there was no evidence that Neaderthals belived in a God at Lascaux.
  • driley Roundab... 2008/12/31 07:23:56
    driley
    Is there evidence they lived in caves?
  • Roundab... driley 2008/12/31 17:37:11
    Roundabout ~ Pepe is my sock puppet
    +1
    Tons!!!!!!!!!!!! By the way Lascaux is a cave in France.
  • driley Roundab... 2008/12/31 19:34:44
    driley
    Thanks, roundabout. I wasn't sure so I googled around a bit. This site and some others not only felt that the "artists" of Lascaux were some who came after the Neanderthals, but that the caves were used for ceremonial reasons, not shelter. Not saying they are necessarily the final answer on "cave men" but I am one of those people who takes what I was taught and then eventually says, "wait a minute, I wonder if that's true..."

    I'd still be interested in other evidence. I'm beginning to wonder if caves were for burial rites, religious rites, art, and maybe temporary shelter, but I am doubting if whole groups lived in them permanantly. I'm willing to be convinced.

    http://www.metmuseum.org/TOAH...
  • Roundab... driley 2008/12/31 20:00:31
    Roundabout ~ Pepe is my sock puppet
    Correct, the people in Lascaux were Homosapiens 35,000 years ago I think. I just hate the word "cave man" because it is too ambiguous and it usually conjures up pictures Neanderthals like on the Geiko commercials. There are more important discoveries, in caves, in South Africa, Homohabilis, the tool maker and much earlier hominids as well. Regarding older hominids it is hard to determine because animals used the caves later and disturbed the evidence. Also, they were much more likely die outside the cave and not be buried where they lived. Therefore, caves contain more hints of how they lived but few fossils except animal bones, tools, etc. There is no evidence of ritualized burials until the Neanderthals that I can remember from my studies in anthropology, but that was years ago.

    There is evidence that some lived in caves but had other camps for hunting and agriculture as in South Africa. There are some caves that they used as catacomb. Here in Eastern Arizona there is an Native American burial cave with lots of art. Only Native Americans can enter the site. The site isn't even a thousand years old and they say the pictographs look like they were just painted.

    Here in the Southwest there are a lot of cliff dwellings which were permanent homes for Native Americans, not that o...''
    Correct, the people in Lascaux were Homosapiens 35,000 years ago I think. I just hate the word "cave man" because it is too ambiguous and it usually conjures up pictures Neanderthals like on the Geiko commercials. There are more important discoveries, in caves, in South Africa, Homohabilis, the tool maker and much earlier hominids as well. Regarding older hominids it is hard to determine because animals used the caves later and disturbed the evidence. Also, they were much more likely die outside the cave and not be buried where they lived. Therefore, caves contain more hints of how they lived but few fossils except animal bones, tools, etc. There is no evidence of ritualized burials until the Neanderthals that I can remember from my studies in anthropology, but that was years ago.

    There is evidence that some lived in caves but had other camps for hunting and agriculture as in South Africa. There are some caves that they used as catacomb. Here in Eastern Arizona there is an Native American burial cave with lots of art. Only Native Americans can enter the site. The site isn't even a thousand years old and they say the pictographs look like they were just painted.

    Here in the Southwest there are a lot of cliff dwellings which were permanent homes for Native Americans, not that old though. But earlier hominids were more nomadic so they'd live in them for some period of time. As the herds thinned from hunting they would need to more on as they hadn't developed agriculture yet.
    (more)
  • driley Roundab... 2008/12/31 20:09:36
    driley
    Great info! Thanks. I wonder if my 50% Native American husband could get into that cave. I'm sure no German girl could. Thing is, I would probably be 500% more interested than he is...

    I've never visited your beautiful part of the country. It is definately on my to-do list though.
  • Roundab... driley 2008/12/31 20:20:51
    Roundabout ~ Pepe is my sock puppet
    Oh, if you do I would suggest New Mexico, I'm in Arizona, the Grand Canyon is grand but here just call it the big ditch. But we do have some important sites here like Wupatki - Anasasi, Casa Grande - Hohokom and more.

    New Mexico has more sites, all around 1,000 years old. Chaco Canyon - Anasazi is the best, Bendelier, petroglyph site, oh so many sites. Colorado has Mesa Verde and more. Lots of books that focus on early Native American sites in the Southwest.

    What's very good is that the parks hire Native Americans as interpretive rangers to meet with the public. Very interesting to hear about their culture, how it's evolved and the very beautiful creation stories (they call them stories because they were not written down until recently.)
  • driley Roundab... 2008/12/31 20:34:58
    driley
    Wow, and right here in my own country. Now I want to come out there even more. Thanks for fueling my dreams.
  • petey driley 2009/11/17 22:06:53
    petey
    i think cavemen are like mountain men!
  • driley petey 2009/11/18 15:52:33
    driley
    Maybe so. The "caveman" idea comes from the thought that man was once very, very primitive and progressed (read evolved) over the centuries into the "highly intelligent" form we find today. It is my belief that the opposite happened. We were created with much higher intelligence, better health and quite a bit larger. Over the centuries, we have devolved into people who now need computers to do our calculations for us.

    What says Petey?
  • petey Roundab... 2009/11/17 22:06:26
    petey
    God is not an invention. He is the Creator of the world. He's not something you just invent...
  • lynnie 2008/12/27 22:30:56
    Undecided
    lynnie
    I just don't know.

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