Quantcast

Was St. Patrick Irish or Italian? I've read a few bios that say his parents were Roman and it is believed that he is, in fact, an Italian. I've also read that he's Irish. What do yo think?

Just D~ Hello, Clarice~ 2009/03/17 04:08:41
I think
I believe
You!
Add Photos & Videos
Add a comment above

Top Opinion

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • Boris Badinov 2009/03/18 15:53:19
    I believe
    Boris Badinov
    +1
    I understand he originated on the British coast. Was kidnappd and taken to Ireland as a slave. Managed to escape and returned to Britain where he came into Christian life then voluntarily returned to Ireland to present Christ to that pagan society. - St. Patrick's Prayer christian life voluntarily returned ireland christ pagan society patricks prayer
  • houstoncarl 2009/03/18 02:52:19
  • Just D~... houston... 2009/03/18 03:42:53
  • semperfi 2009/03/17 17:36:52
  • Sono Violado 2009/03/17 17:16:04
    None of the above
    Sono Violado
    +2
    Don't matter to me, just pass the beer!
  • Just D~... Sono Vi... 2009/03/17 17:22:38
    Just D~ Hello, Clarice~
    +3
    You got it....
  • Bob-chicka-wow-wow 2009/03/17 16:47:26
    I think
    Bob-chicka-wow-wow
    +3
    he was english
  • Just D~... Bob-chi... 2009/03/17 16:57:45
  • Bob-chi... Just D~... 2009/03/17 16:58:34
    Bob-chicka-wow-wow
    +1
    slainte
  • Orangedragan 2009/03/17 16:08:36
    None of the above
    Orangedragan
    +2
    He was born and raised in England, and was actually a slave for quite some time
  • Just D~... Oranged... 2009/03/17 16:24:23
  • semperfi Oranged... 2009/03/17 17:17:26
  • BONNIE 2009/03/17 15:25:39 (edited)
    None of the above
    BONNIE
    +2
    Let's Just Drink!!!
    Here's to All Nationalities!!!!!!!!
    drink
  • Just D~... BONNIE 2009/03/17 16:23:33
    Just D~ Hello, Clarice~
    +2
    I like the way you think.. : )
  • BONNIE Just D~... 2009/03/17 16:38:12
    BONNIE
    +2
    Thanks!!!!
  • rebmama 2009/03/17 14:03:12
    None of the above
    rebmama
    +2
    Patrick, Saint
    Patrick, Saint (389?-461?), called the Apostle of Ireland, Christian prelate. His birthplace is uncertain, but it was probably in southwestern Britain; his British name was Succat. At 16 years of age he was carried off by Irish marauders and passed his captivity as a herdsman near the mountain Slemish in county Antrim (according to tradition) or in county Connacht. The young herdsman saw visions in which he was urged to escape, and after six years of slavery he did so, to the northern coast of Gaul. Ordained a priest, possibly by Saint Germanus, at Auxerre, he returned to Ireland. Sometime after 431, Patrick was appointed successor to St. Palladius, first bishop of Ireland. Patrick concentrated on the west and north of Ireland, establishing his see at Armagh. Patrick's two surviving works are written in Latin and demonstrate his acquaintance with the Vulgate translation of the Bible. In one of these works, the Confessions, Patrick portrays himself as an ignorant yokel in an unequal contest with the powerful and learned adherents of Pelagianism. His reported use of the shamrock as an illustration of the Trinity led to its being regarded as the Irish national symbol. A strange chant of his, called the Lorica, is preserved in the Liber Hymnorum (Book of Hymns), and ...


    Patrick, Saint
    Patrick, Saint (389?-461?), called the Apostle of Ireland, Christian prelate. His birthplace is uncertain, but it was probably in southwestern Britain; his British name was Succat. At 16 years of age he was carried off by Irish marauders and passed his captivity as a herdsman near the mountain Slemish in county Antrim (according to tradition) or in county Connacht. The young herdsman saw visions in which he was urged to escape, and after six years of slavery he did so, to the northern coast of Gaul. Ordained a priest, possibly by Saint Germanus, at Auxerre, he returned to Ireland. Sometime after 431, Patrick was appointed successor to St. Palladius, first bishop of Ireland. Patrick concentrated on the west and north of Ireland, establishing his see at Armagh. Patrick's two surviving works are written in Latin and demonstrate his acquaintance with the Vulgate translation of the Bible. In one of these works, the Confessions, Patrick portrays himself as an ignorant yokel in an unequal contest with the powerful and learned adherents of Pelagianism. His reported use of the shamrock as an illustration of the Trinity led to its being regarded as the Irish national symbol. A strange chant of his, called the Lorica, is preserved in the Liber Hymnorum (Book of Hymns), and what purports to have been a handbell he used during Mass is shown in the National Museum in Dublin. His traditional feast day is March 17.


    Microsoft ® Encarta ® Reference Library 2004. © 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
    (more)
  • Just D~... rebmama 2009/03/17 14:11:57
  • Pip 2009/03/17 13:40:19
    I think
    Pip
    +3
    This from... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Saint Patrick

    Jump to: navigation, search
    Semi-protected
    Saint Patrick

    Born c. AD 387
    Banna Venta Berniae, Britain
    Died 17 March, 461
    Venerated in Anglicanism
    Eastern Orthodoxy
    Lutheranism
    Roman Catholicism
    Feast 17 March (Saint Patrick's Day)
    Patronage Ireland, Nigeria, Montserrat, New York, Boston, engineers, against snakes, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne [1]

    Saint Patrick (estimated AD 387 - AD 461)(Latin: Patricius,[2] Irish: Naomh Pádraig), said[by whom?] to have been born Maewyn Succat (Latin: Magonus Succetus), was a Roman Britain-born Christian missionary and is the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. He was educated at a monastery and school of divinity founded by Saint Illtud (now Llantwit Major), often called "the oldest university in the world". It was distinguished for also educating Taliesin, Saint Gildas, Saint Samson, Saint Paul Aurelian and possibly Saint David, Patron Saint of Wales.

    When he was about sixteen he was captured by Irish raiders and taken from his native Wales as a slave to Ireland, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After entering the church, he later returned to Ireland as a missionary in the north and west of...

    ''
    This from... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Saint Patrick

    Jump to: navigation, search
    Semi-protected
    Saint Patrick

    Born c. AD 387
    Banna Venta Berniae, Britain
    Died 17 March, 461
    Venerated in Anglicanism
    Eastern Orthodoxy
    Lutheranism
    Roman Catholicism
    Feast 17 March (Saint Patrick's Day)
    Patronage Ireland, Nigeria, Montserrat, New York, Boston, engineers, against snakes, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne [1]

    Saint Patrick (estimated AD 387 - AD 461)(Latin: Patricius,[2] Irish: Naomh Pádraig), said[by whom?] to have been born Maewyn Succat (Latin: Magonus Succetus), was a Roman Britain-born Christian missionary and is the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. He was educated at a monastery and school of divinity founded by Saint Illtud (now Llantwit Major), often called "the oldest university in the world". It was distinguished for also educating Taliesin, Saint Gildas, Saint Samson, Saint Paul Aurelian and possibly Saint David, Patron Saint of Wales.

    When he was about sixteen he was captured by Irish raiders and taken from his native Wales as a slave to Ireland, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After entering the church, he later returned to Ireland as a missionary in the north and west of the island, but little is known about the places where he worked and no link can be made between Patrick and any church. By the eighth century he had become the patron saint of Ireland. The Irish monastery system evolved after the time of Patrick and the Irish church did not develop the diocesan model that Patrick and the other early missionaries had tried to establish.

    The available body of evidence does not allow the dates of Patrick's life to be fixed with certainty, but it appears that he was active as a missionary in Ireland during the second half of the fifth century. Two letters from him survive, along with later hagiographies from the seventh century onwards. Many of these works cannot be taken as authentic traditions. Uncritical acceptance of the Annals of Ulster (see below) would imply that he lived from 340 to 460, and ministered in what is modern day northern Ireland from 428 onwards. On 17th March St.Patrick's day is celebrated to remember him and what he did. This is celebrated across the world.
    (more)
  • Just D~... Pip 2009/03/17 13:48:43
  • Crankney - PKM 2009/03/17 12:49:00
    All of the above
    Crankney - PKM
    +4
    An Irish Italian with a wee bit o Scotch mixed in, me thinks!
  • Von Douche 2009/03/17 12:11:32
    None of the above
    Von Douche
  • Just D~... Von Douche 2009/03/17 13:12:02
  • Guyupstairs 2009/03/17 12:06:03 (edited)
    I think
    Guyupstairs
    +3
    He was the following:
    A regiment of the Mexican army in the 1846 -8 War between Mexico and America was named after St Patrick. Members of the Batellón de San Patricio included Afro-Americans freshly liberated from the slave plantations of the South, and the soldiers were granted Mexican citizenship afterwards.

    Or:
    he was a Germen living in Ireland drinking Italian wine.

    Or:

    I have no clue who or what he was, I do look good in green however and I stayed in a Holiday Inn Express last night!
  • Just D~... Guyupst... 2009/03/17 13:15:19
    Just D~ Hello, Clarice~
    +6
    LMAO!!

    lmao
  • Guyupst... Just D~... 2009/03/17 13:20:41
    Guyupstairs
    +3
    now that is funny
  • Nanz 2009/03/17 09:45:06
    I think
    Nanz
    +3
    Irishlian
  • Just D~... Nanz 2009/03/17 13:16:06
  • Nanz Just D~... 2009/03/17 13:17:36
    Nanz
    +3



    thnx n same 2 u!!!
  • Sadie100~In God we trust~ 2009/03/17 06:56:12
    All of the above
    Sadie100~In God we trust~
    +6
    I've heard both stories, but he was born in England!! ive heard stories born england
  • Just D~... Sadie10... 2009/03/17 07:01:13
  • Sadie10... Just D~... 2009/03/17 07:47:47
  • Just D~... Sadie10... 2009/03/17 16:26:07
  • Sadie10... Just D~... 2009/03/17 22:54:20
  • None of the above
    Angel Among Us ♥†♥ American Patriot
    +5
    I don't know enough about it, but I always thought he was Irish.
  • Just D~... Angel A... 2009/03/17 06:49:45
  • Angel A... Just D~... 2009/03/17 06:55:44
    Angel Among Us ♥†♥ American Patriot
    +6
    You too!!!
  • irishinthezoo 2009/03/17 06:16:18
    None of the above
    irishinthezoo
    +3
    St. Patrick was born in Britain. He was captured by a group of Irish raiders and was imprisoned in Ireland 6 years before he escaped and traveled back to Britain. Once back in Britian, Patrick proclaimed that God spoke to him in a vision and that he was to travel back to Ireland as a missionary. After 15 years of religious training and being ordained as a priest, he travled back to Ireland to convert the Irish. www.history.com can provide more information if anyone is interested :) ordained priest travled ireland convert irish www history provide information
  • Dagon 2009/03/17 05:44:03
  • ITALIAN CLICKER 2009/03/17 05:43:30
    I believe
    ITALIAN CLICKER
    +5
    I HEARD BOTH STORIES TOO!!!

    Who was St. Patrick?
    Henri provides some history

    By Henri Bourride
    More stories by this author...


    This article was published on 03.10.05.



    PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAREY WILSON


    Though ordinarily a bit timid for parlor games, particularly those involving wagering, Henri has a favorite around this time of the year, a trivia question, over which he will occasionally bet a glass of wine: What nationality was St. Patrick? Naturally, most will say Irish, at which point Henri collects his purse.

    The answer is English and Italian or, more accurately, English and Roman. Historians believe, based on St. Patrick’s own Confessions, that Ireland’s patron saint was born in England, the son of an English woman and Calpurnius, a member of the Roman ruling class. When the Roman empire began to collapse in the early fifth century, many Roman men returned to Rome to help attempt to stave off the invading Barbarians, leaving many women and children in England ripe for kidnapping by Celtic raiding parties, who brought the children back to Ireland as slaves--which is what happened to young Patrick.

    At age 16, Patrick tells us, he was working as a shepherd in what is today County Mayo or Antrim, and then, at 23, he escaped his captors and returned to Englan...

    I HEARD BOTH STORIES TOO!!!

    Who was St. Patrick?
    Henri provides some history

    By Henri Bourride
    More stories by this author...


    This article was published on 03.10.05.



    PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAREY WILSON


    Though ordinarily a bit timid for parlor games, particularly those involving wagering, Henri has a favorite around this time of the year, a trivia question, over which he will occasionally bet a glass of wine: What nationality was St. Patrick? Naturally, most will say Irish, at which point Henri collects his purse.

    The answer is English and Italian or, more accurately, English and Roman. Historians believe, based on St. Patrick’s own Confessions, that Ireland’s patron saint was born in England, the son of an English woman and Calpurnius, a member of the Roman ruling class. When the Roman empire began to collapse in the early fifth century, many Roman men returned to Rome to help attempt to stave off the invading Barbarians, leaving many women and children in England ripe for kidnapping by Celtic raiding parties, who brought the children back to Ireland as slaves--which is what happened to young Patrick.

    At age 16, Patrick tells us, he was working as a shepherd in what is today County Mayo or Antrim, and then, at 23, he escaped his captors and returned to England, traveled south perhaps even as far as Rome, at some point being ordained a Catholic priest. He later returned to Ireland, from which, as legend has it, he drove away the snakes--that is, baptized and otherwise converted much of pagan Ireland. Though exactly when he died is uncertain, 461 has been popularly accepted as the year, and, of course, March 17 as the day, which has become a traditional Irish holiday.

    What’s not traditionally Irish is the corned-beef-and-cabbage dinner associated with the holiday--nor is the Beaujolais with which Henri pairs his St. Patrick’s Day stew. The corned beef actually originated in America around the turn of the last century, when impoverished Irish immigrants living on New York City’s Lower East Side substituted beef for their traditional Irish bacon. More on the Beaujolais later. Though today, the brisket is “corned” with various spices, in the days before refrigeration it was preserved with coarse grains of salt, or “corn.”
    (more)
  • Just D~... ITALIAN... 2009/03/17 06:45:30

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

News & Politics

2014/10/23 09:28:47

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals