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Was Jesus' Resurrection a Sequel? New Evidence

santanasmooth 2011/09/01 13:42:27
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3-ft.-high tablet romantically dubbed "Gabriel's Revelation" could
challenge the uniqueness of the idea of the Christian Resurrection. The
tablet appears to date authentically to the years just before the birth
of Jesus and yet — at least according to one Israeli scholar — it
announces the raising of a messiah after three days in the grave. If
true, this could mean that Jesus' followers had access to a
well-established paradigm when they decreed that Christ himself rose on
the third day — and it might even hint that they they could have applied
it in their grief after their master was crucified. However, such a
contentious reading of the 87-line tablet depends on creative
interpretation of a smudged passage, making it the latest entry in the
woulda/coulda/shoulda category of possible New Testament artifacts; they
are useful to prove less-spectacular points and to stir discussion on
the big ones, but probably not to settle them nor shake anyone's faith.

The ink-on-stone document, which is owned by a Swiss-Israeli antiques
collector and reportedly came to light about a decade ago, has been
dated by manuscript and chemical experts to a period just before Jesus'
birth. Some scholars think it may originally have been part of the Dead
Sea Scrolls, a trove of religious texts found in caves on the West Bank
that were possibly associated with John the Baptist. The tablet is
written in the form of an end-of-the-world prediction in the voice of
the angel Gabriel; one line, for instance, predicts that "in three days
you will know evil will be defeated by justice."



Such "apocalypses," often featuring a triumphant military figure
called a messiah (literally, anointed one), were not uncommon in the
religious and politically tumultuous Jewish world of 1st century B.C.
Palestine. But what may make the Gabriel tablet unique is its 80th line,
which begins with the words "In three days" and includes some form of
the verb "to live." Israel Knohl, an expert in Talmudic and biblical
language at Jerusalem's Hebrew University who was not involved in the
first research on the artifact, claims that it refers to a historic
1st-century Jewish rebel named Simon who was killed by the Romans in 4
B.C., and should read "In three days, you shall live. I Gabriel command
you." If so, Jesus-era Judaism had begun to explore the idea of a
three-day resurrection before Jesus was born.



This, in turn, undermines one of the strongest literary arguments
employed by Christians over centuries to support the historicity of the
Resurrection (in which they believe on faith): the specificity and
novelty of the idea that the Messiah would die on a Friday and rise on a
Sunday. Who could make such stuff up? But, as Knohl told TIME, maybe
the Christians had a model to work from. The idea of a "dying and rising
messiah appears in some Jewish texts, but until now, everyone thought
that was the impact of Christianity on Judaism," he says. "But for the
first time, we have proof that it was the other way around. The concept
was there before Jesus." If so, he goes on, "this should shake our basic
view of Christianity. ... What happens in the New Testament [could have
been] adopted by Jesus and his followers based on an earlier messiah
story."



Not so fast, say some Christian academics. "It is certainly not
perfectly clear that the tablet is talking about a crucified and risen
savior figure called Simon," says Ben Witherington, an
early-Christianity expert at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Ky.
The verb that Knohl translates as "rise!," Witherington says, could
also mean "there arose," and so one can ask "does it mean 'he comes to
life,' i.e., a resurrection, or that he just 'shows up?' " Witherington
also points out that gospel texts are far less reliant on the observed
fact of the Resurrection (there is no angelic command in them like the
line in the Gabriel stone) than on the testimony of eyewitnesses to
Jesus' post-Resurrection self. Finally, Witherington notes that if he
is wrong and Knohl's reading is right, it at least sets to rest the
notion that the various gospel quotes attributed to Christ foreshadowing
his death and Resurrection were textual retrojections put in his mouth
by later believers — Jesus the Messianic Jew, as Knohl sees him, would
have been familiar with the vocabulary for his own fate.



Knohl stands by his reading. "The spelling and the phrasing is
unique," he told TIME, "but it is similar to to other texts found around
the Dead Sea." Yet for now, at least, Gabriel's Revelation must take
its place among a slew of recently discovered or rediscovered objects
from around the time of Jesus that are claimed to either support or
undermine Scripture but are themselves sufficiently, logically or
archaeologically compromised to prevent their being definitive. In 2002,
a bone-storage box with the legend "James Son of Joseph Brother of Jesus"
bobbed up that seemed to buttress Jesus' historicity while at the same
time suggest that the Catholic teaching that he had no true brothers was
false — but the Israeli Antiquities Authority declared the inscription
as a forgery (although various experts continue to disagree). In 2007
the Discovery Channel aired a documentary (funded by Titanic director James Cameron) that purported to have located the "Jesus Family Tomb" in the Israeli suburb of Talpiot,
with bone boxes with the names "Jesus Son of Joseph," "Mary" and one of
the names of Mary Magdalene. If the ossuaries were for the gospel
Jesus, his mother and Mary Magdalene, then the implications for
Christianity would be dire; but despite considerable initial hoopla, the
idea is regarded by many as speculation.



It remains to be seen whether Gabriel's Revelation, and especially
Knohl's interpretation, will weather the hot lights of fame. Even the
authors of its initial research seem a little dubious about his claims
that it is a dry run for the Easter story. But, as often happens in such
cases, they seem better disposed to a slightly toned-down assertion: in
this case, that the Gabriel tablet does indicate a very rare instance
of the idea that a messiah might suffer — a notion introduced in Judaic
thought centuries before by the prophet Isaiah but which supposedly went
out of style by Jesus' time. If that more modest theory gains traction,
it will forge a link between a trend in first-century Judaism and one
of Christianity's galvanizing thoughts — that God might throw in his lot
with a suffering or even murdered man — that could contribute to a
growing mutual understanding.






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  • jackolantyrn356 2011/09/03 05:02:50
    I think
    jackolantyrn356
    First I would ask where this thing came from. And what is its origion.???? This seems to be script that was written later than the plane UNICLE of writtings before the 3rd Century AD. Pampliset style writing has a later desct=riptions usually. This is pretty much an analysis of somethiing that ois far later than the claim.
  • 8mariedawn6 2011/09/02 02:03:50
    I think
    8mariedawn6
    I personally think we have to be real careful of what we belive in this day and age.There is so much evil going on and lies about the Lord we really have to be careful.
  • Teancum79 2011/09/01 15:50:01
    interesting
    Teancum79
    Given that many religious people believe that significant events are told ahead of time it is doubtful that it will jeopardize any believes views though is may serve to strengthen criticism by non believers.
  • FAWKES' NOOSE ~ ΔTX 2011/09/01 15:23:15 (edited)
    I think
    FAWKES' NOOSE ~ ΔTX
    Jesus did not die on the cross. He survived by the medical skills of Nicodemus the physician and the bargaining power of Joseph of Arimathea. The details of the crucifixion written in the gospels also support the theory that he did not die and in fact describe medical treatment that he was receiving even while on the cross (sponge soaked in vinegar - which would have contained mandrake). Survival of crucifixion was not uncommon.

    When you look for historical records of Jesus outside Christian teaching, there is plenty of it - including a body. Details of Jesus after the crucifixion are recorded in history all throughout the Middle East and culminating in Kashmir, where he died some 30 years after the Crucifixion.



    That is the tomb of "Issa - The Shepherd Who Teaches Others." "Issa" is the Arabic form of the Hebrew name "Yeshua" which we know as Jesus. Issa arrived in Kashmir from Israel around 30AD with a woman named Mary. Issa taught a philosophy of love for one another and to turn the other cheek rather than the Jewish doctrine of an eye for an eye.There is a carved marker on Issa's tomb showing severely wounded feet. His grave is in Srinagar. Mary's tomb called "Mai Mari da Asthan" (translation: The final resting place of Mary) is located nearby in Pindi Point.

    This is not ...





    Jesus did not die on the cross. He survived by the medical skills of Nicodemus the physician and the bargaining power of Joseph of Arimathea. The details of the crucifixion written in the gospels also support the theory that he did not die and in fact describe medical treatment that he was receiving even while on the cross (sponge soaked in vinegar - which would have contained mandrake). Survival of crucifixion was not uncommon.

    When you look for historical records of Jesus outside Christian teaching, there is plenty of it - including a body. Details of Jesus after the crucifixion are recorded in history all throughout the Middle East and culminating in Kashmir, where he died some 30 years after the Crucifixion.

    history middle east culminating kashmir died 30 years crucifixion

    That is the tomb of "Issa - The Shepherd Who Teaches Others." "Issa" is the Arabic form of the Hebrew name "Yeshua" which we know as Jesus. Issa arrived in Kashmir from Israel around 30AD with a woman named Mary. Issa taught a philosophy of love for one another and to turn the other cheek rather than the Jewish doctrine of an eye for an eye.There is a carved marker on Issa's tomb showing severely wounded feet. His grave is in Srinagar. Mary's tomb called "Mai Mari da Asthan" (translation: The final resting place of Mary) is located nearby in Pindi Point.

    This is not speculation. This part of written Kashmiri History and well documented.

    Mai Mari da Asthan:

    speculation written kashmiri history documented mai mari da asthan

    The "Mary" buried at Pindi Point is thought by some to be Jesus' mother, but is more likely to be Mary Magdalene since its fairly well accepted that Jesus' mother Mary traveled with her uncle, Joseph of Arimathea, to Glastonbury and is buried there.
    (more)
  • Shae 2011/09/01 14:49:15
    interesting
    Shae
    I wouldn't negate the christian religion over it though.
    Even if you don't believe in Christianity you have to admit it does benefit society.
    Martin Luther King Jr learned non violence from the teachings of Jesus Christ.
  • Smokey Shae 2011/09/01 15:19:52
    Smokey
    +1
    Ghandi... Ghandi... MLK learned non violence from several leaders and teachings. Some who were not Christian. Just wanted to provide that info to you.

    Take care,

    Smokey
  • Shae Smokey 2011/09/01 15:28:18
    Shae
    thank you but as a minister I'm sure the teachings of Jesus Christ modeled him into the man he became.
  • Smokey Shae 2011/09/01 15:31:14
    Smokey
    +1
    Oh, without a doubt that the teachings of Jesus had a huge influence over him as well. I just wanted to point out that in several of his writings, he was inspired by people like Ghadi who initally started the non violence movement and was successful. Remember, Nelson Mandela tried the same, but was unsuccessful after spending most of his life in prison.

    Smokey
  • Shae Smokey 2011/09/01 15:41:57
    Shae
    I was going to say Mandela also since he is a Methodist, but didn't want anyone to bash because when his non-violence didn't work he started attacking (although when he attacked a building he made sure no one was inside). Still violent measures.

    I just get upset when people use some archaic object to nullify what has helped and shaped people for a long time. Leave religion alone. Learn to except peoples difference and not accept them inspite of their differences.

    Jesus Christ (wether you believe or not) was a good man (son of God or not) to use as a guide to how to live your life. Love thy neighbor, treat those as you'd wish to be treated, love thy enemy, etc.
  • Smokey Shae 2011/09/01 16:32:36
    Smokey
    +1
    I agree totally!
  • santanasmooth 2011/09/01 13:50:55
    interesting
    santanasmooth
    Most things in religion are borrowed , so why not this story?

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