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Teens' Racist YouTube Rant Goes Viral, Sparks Death Threats

★~DoctorWhoGuru~★ 2012/02/21 22:43:42


After two minors from Gainesville High School in Gainesville, Fla., posted a nearly 14-minute-long racist rant on YouTube, the girls are "no longer students at the school," WCJB-TV reports.

(Scroll for video.)

Last week, eight police officers were brought to the campus in light of death threats the girls were receiving in response to their videos. The videos included comments like, "You can understand what we are saying, our accents, we use actual words. Black people do not."

Gainesville High School principal David Shelnutt did not go into detail on the extent of the disciplinary action taken against the girls, but did tell WCJB that their comments were not welcome at the school.

"There's no place for comments like that, that video here at GHS," Shelnutt told the station. "There's no place for that in the Alachua County Public School System, and my opinion, no place for that in society in general."

Since the video went viral last week, the girls have experienced harassment and said they feared for their safety. According to one report by the Gainesville Sun, one of the students involved was hiding out at a relative's house while her mother was at work.

“Our lives have changed totally, 180 degrees," her mother told the paper. "This has made her an adult really quick.”

The girls and one of their parents issued a formal apology in the paper Monday:

"I am one of the girls who were in the racist video that got posted. I’m writing this so that I can tell people how truly sorry I am. I could never, in a million years, have pictured this happening with me involved. I wasn’t raised to hate people for their race, and I still don’t. I made a horrible decision in being a part of this video ... "

The girl also writes that she won't make excuses, but hopes the community will eventually forgive her.

In another apology, the second girl's mother says her daughter has gone into a depression following the backlash of the video, and hopes that the community will forgive her and end the harassment:

"While we can never take back the words and actions that these two children have said, we have to start to heal and forgive IMMEDIATELY. Stop the violent threats to our homes and our children, stop the anger, because this will solve absolutely nothing, and most importantly, look at yourself for change and love."

According to the Gainesville Sun, the high school will wear orange, the color of racial tolerance, this week as a sign of solidarity.

The response to the girls' videos echos sentiments of racial issues in school communities across the country.

Just last summer, 18-year-old Kymberly Wimberly of Arkansas filed suit against McGehee Secondary School after four years of nearly straight-As, honors and Advanced Placement classes had placed her at the top of her graduating class. The suit alleges that though she earned the marks, the school denied her valedictorian status because she is black.

A separate suit filed against a Minnesota school district last August claimed that a Red Wing High School homecoming event called "Wigger Day" caused a black student "severe emotional distress including depression, loss of sleep, stress, crying, humiliation, anxiety, and shame."

"Wigger is a pejorative slang term for a white person who emulates the mannerisms, language and fashions associated with African-American culture," the complaint explains. Students were encouraged to dress in oversized sports jerseys, low-slung pants, baseball hats cocked to the side and 'doo rags.

Most recently in Norcross, Ga., a Beaver Ridge Elementary School teacher resigned after outcry over a third grade math assignment that used slavery examples in word problems. Parents were outraged at both the assignment and the school district's response to the reports of those math problems, which included references to cotton, orange picking and beatings.

One problem read: "If Frederick got two beatings per day, how many beatings did he get in 1 week?"

On the other end of the spectrum, this sensitivity -- or sometimes, lack thereof -- seems to create a bit of an identity crisis among schoolchildren. Some black students say they feel ostracized for acting "too white." One Connecticut middle school student said he was stabbed in the back with a pencil by a peer who thought he wasn't acting "black enough."

Read More: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/21/gainesvil...

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  • scum1 2012/02/21 23:57:06
    scum1
    +9
    I am still baffeled by the math teacher at the bottom of this article who used math problems, which included references to cotton, orange picking and beatings. How in the world do you graduate college and get hired to teach when you are this stupid?

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  • Sean McDonald 2012/07/06 05:15:35
    Sean McDonald
    +1
    Racist Bitches
  • Alexis 2012/07/05 23:14:27
    Alexis
    +1
    Round of applause to the parents who gave them a video camera.
  • ʂıoвнaп ♡ 2012/07/05 17:46:49
    ʂıoвнaп ♡
    +1
    Those girls don't deserve to die, but they deserve the death threats they're getting since that serves them right. If they didn't want some sort of backlash, they shouldn't have run their bitch-ass mouths.
  • Gothpirate 2012/07/05 14:31:18
    Gothpirate
    +2
    I wouldn't say they should die but they both deserve to have some common sense smacked into them
  • Anthony Souls 2012/07/05 07:59:08
    Anthony Souls
    +1
    If you believe in God at all, You will be judged with the same judgement that you judge others with: if you don't forgive others, God will judge you by the same standards. The only thing unforgivable is what God ordains to be unforgivable through His Word. However, if you don't believe in God, this truth will be lost on you.

    I don't condone racism, hatred, and unGodly treatments of others: even though these girls were racist, more so stereotypical and ignorant to me, I would never defile myself by lowering myself and filling myself with sin/darkness against them: Justly rebuke them? Yes, but only justly so. Therefore, no matter how wrong they were in their language, how much more evil are those that are hateful of them, thinking themselves to be superior? Just a different form of hatred that makes them all the more hypocritical and similar.

    Well, that's all I have to say, as it disgusts me to see people spewing abominations at them, while being of the same mentality, if not lower.

    Take care,

    P.S. It's insane how much of societies mob-like justice and tendencies are so self apparent and emerging as a norm.
  • Anthony... Anthony... 2012/07/05 08:03:59 (edited)
    Anthony Souls
    +2
    If God stands by those that you have forsaken and forgives those that you never will, How much greater is your evilness for standing against God?

    Something to consider. Take care,
  • Nimitz 2012/07/05 06:11:41
    Nimitz
    +1
    JADA (Just Another Dumb Ass)
  • ✿Britt ❤'s Steven Tyler✿ 2012/07/05 04:48:06
    ✿Britt ❤'s Steven Tyler✿
    +2
    are they stupid or something. and they very well deserve the death threats they are getting.no point in them regreting and saying sorry, they should have thought of that before the started flapping their jaws and posting it on the net.
  • VICTORIA 2012/07/05 04:13:40
    VICTORIA
    +3
    These stupid little girls wanted attention, and they are getting it.

    Expect more of this- especially with the RWNJ's attacks on education.

    Tea Party Groups In Tennessee Demand Textbooks Overlook U.S. Founder's Slave-Owning History
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
  • ☂cinderella.dress.in.yellow☂ 2012/07/05 03:57:51
    ☂cinderella.dress.in.yellow☂
    +1
    "FACEPLAM"
    As you know african american part native american person
    yes there very stereotypical let me give you a brief things about my personality
    1. Yea i listen to all types of music
    2. i dont have baby daddy's as you say not even plaining to have kids
    3. i dont do drugs
    4. im not a loud talker in real life im almost silnet
  • NoHandlebarsAttached 2012/07/05 03:52:11
    NoHandlebarsAttached
    +1
    Those girls are disgusting, moronic, racist scum. Plain and simple.
  • ☠ Tħε ☣ Øиe ☠ 2012/07/05 03:46:55
  • Kibbles 2012/07/05 03:45:44
    Kibbles
    +1
    Saw this before, honestly her first one was ridiculously ignorant, so much so that my friends and I were annoyed but when we heard their ignorance we just realized they were idiots.
  • Helmholtz 2012/07/05 03:44:25
    Helmholtz
    +2
    I don't agree with them, but it's disgusting that free speech during freetime, apparently, isn't respected by school officials in FL. The principal's job should be to protect controversial speech. PC speech isn't what the 1st Ammendment was meant to protect, because PC speech will never be challenged. The fact that the 1st Ammendment extists is evidence that very offensive speech must be protected. And I agree with the 1st Ammendment.
  • JwonGalt 2012/07/05 03:43:48
  • Vision of Verve 2012/07/05 03:23:24
  • The Aging Yankee Liberal Do... 2012/07/05 02:46:59
  • Amethyst Hearts 2012/03/23 22:41:18 (edited)
    Amethyst Hearts
    +2
    Im usually a forgive but dont forget type of person. But these girls in my book will never be forgiven. Blacks were hated because of the dark color of our skin. Whites, Hispanics, Asians and Blacks all get darker skin when out in the sun. When we use some type of lotion we can all bleach our skin too. My point in saying this is that, no matter what skin tone we have, the true person within us has not changed.

    I speak well, at least I hope so, I listen to All kinds of music, dont do drugs, dont sleep around, and Im very quiet. All that and Im African American...

    My best friend is blonde and shes one of the smartest girls youll ever meet.

    Im friends with a red head, an Im pretty sure he has a soul.

    I know a Hispanic, who's just as lazy as me.

    And a girl thats Asian but she and I both struggle with math.

    Get were Im getting at here...?



    So not only were those girls comments racist, and stereotypical, but they were also ignorant.

    So the next time those girls want to go on a little "rant", they need to get their facts straight first.

    Seriously.
  • Anthony... Amethys... 2012/07/05 07:57:47
    Anthony Souls
    If you believe in God at all, You will be judged with the same judgement that you judge others with: if you don't forgive others, God will judge you by the same standards. The only thing unforgivable is what God ordains to be unforgivable through His Word. However, if you don't believe in God, this truth will be lost on you.

    I don't condone racism, hatred, and unGodly treatments of others: even though these girls were racist, more so stereotypical and ignorant to me, I would never defile myself by lowering myself and filling myself with sin/darkness against them: Justly rebuke them? Yes, but only justly so. Therefore, no matter how wrong they were in their language, how much more evil are those that are hateful of them, thinking themselves to be superior? Just a different form of hatred that makes them all the more hypocritical and similar.

    Well, that's all I have to say, as it disgusts me to see people spewing abominations at them, while being of the same mentality, if not lower.

    Take care,
  • Jacobobryan 2012/03/13 02:56:32
  • Jacobobryan 2012/03/13 00:24:18
  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 01:43:04
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +3


    Personal Information Born Oswald S. Williams on September 2, 1921, in Washington, DC; son of Oswald S. (a postal worker) and Marie (Madden) Williams; married Doris Reid Williams, 1943; children: Bruce, Gregory (died 1982), and Meredith.
    Education: New York University, B.S., 1943, M.S., 1947; St. John's University, M.B.A., 1981.
    Memberships: former member, chair, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Career Republic Aviation, design engineer, 1942, steadily promoted to senior aerodynamicist, 1943-46; Babcock and Wilcox, design draftsman, c. 1947-48; U.S. Navy Material Catalog Office, technical writer, c. 1948-50; Greer Hydraulics, Inc., design group project leader, c. 1950-56; Thiokol Chemical Corporation, Reaction Motors Division, small rocket engine designer, 1956-61; Grumman Aerospace Corporation, propulsion engineer, 1961-c. 1973; Grumman International, marketing department, 1973, vice president, 1974. St. John's University, marketing professor, c. 1980s. Life's Work Inventor and engineer O. S. Williams was the second African American to receive a degree in aeronautical engineering and the first to be hired as a design engineer by Republic Aviation--one of the leaders of the industry in the 1940s. At a time when blacks were discouraged from the engineeri...



    Personal Information

    Born Oswald S. Williams on September 2, 1921, in Washington, DC; son of Oswald S. (a postal worker) and Marie (Madden) Williams; married Doris Reid Williams, 1943; children: Bruce, Gregory (died 1982), and Meredith.
    Education: New York University, B.S., 1943, M.S., 1947; St. John's University, M.B.A., 1981.
    Memberships: former member, chair, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

    Career

    Republic Aviation, design engineer, 1942, steadily promoted to senior aerodynamicist, 1943-46; Babcock and Wilcox, design draftsman, c. 1947-48; U.S. Navy Material Catalog Office, technical writer, c. 1948-50; Greer Hydraulics, Inc., design group project leader, c. 1950-56; Thiokol Chemical Corporation, Reaction Motors Division, small rocket engine designer, 1956-61; Grumman Aerospace Corporation, propulsion engineer, 1961-c. 1973; Grumman International, marketing department, 1973, vice president, 1974. St. John's University, marketing professor, c. 1980s.

    Life's Work

    Inventor and engineer O. S. Williams was the second African American to receive a degree in aeronautical engineering and the first to be hired as a design engineer by Republic Aviation--one of the leaders of the industry in the 1940s. At a time when blacks were discouraged from the engineering field, Williams blazed many trails. His accomplishments over the years included heading the team that originated the first experimental airborne radio beacon for tracking crashed aircraft and managing the development of the control rocket systems for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo missions, including the fateful thirteenth one in 1970. William's rockets are credited with saving the lives of the Apollo 13 astronauts.

    Oswald S. "Ozzie" Williams was born on September 2, 1921, in Washington, DC, to Oswald S. Williams, a postal worker, and Marie (Madden) Williams, a housewife. He grew up in New York City, graduating from Boys High School in Brooklyn in 1938. As a teenager, he loved making model airplanes and decided to become an engineer after a family friend explained that engineers design things.

    Williams had hoped to enroll in the program offered by New York University (NYU), but he was discouraged by a dean. As he recounted in an interview with Notable Twentieth Century Scientists, the dean told him that "people of your race are not ready for engineering, and engineering is not ready for you. I warn you not to waste your ambition and training where you cannot get a job." Despite such advice, Williams matriculated at NYU, completing his bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering in 1943.

    Around the same time Williams joined Republic Aviation's technical staff. Just as the NYU dean had warned, Republic Aviation had not wanted to employ a black, but Williams dazzled those met there, and he was quickly brought on board. Hired as a design engineer, Williams quickly rose through the ranks, becoming a senior aerodynamicist within four years. In that role--achieved as World War II ensued--he helped design the P47 Thunderbird, an escort plane used to protect high-altitude bombers. Via wind tunnel testing, Williams was responsible for estimating and calculating the lift of the plane's wings, its propelling forces, and its drag in order to determine how well the airplane would fly and its overall stability. The P47 aircraft proved to be pivotal in the U.S. war effort.

    In 1947, the same year in which he earned his master's degree in aeronautical engineering from NYU, Williams moved to Babcock and Wilcox company, where he was a design draftsman. He then spent two years as a technical writer with the U.S. Navy Material Catalog Office, leaving in 1950 to take an engineering position at Greer Hydraulics, Inc. A group project leader, Williams was helped develop the first experimental airborne radio beacon, which was used to locate airplanes that had crashed. The beacon was fired by catapult and parachuted to the ground as an airplane disintegrated, potentially landing anywhere: in water, in a tree, on level ground, or on a mountainside. Thus the project was very challenging since the beacon had to operate equally well wherever it landed and whatever the weather conditions. Williams's team developed a beacon that could recognize where it had landed and transmit its position, but unfortunately, it was never produced commercially.

    In 1956, Williams moved to the Reaction Motors Division of Thiokol Chemical Corporation, where he was responsible for pioneering work in the area of small rocket engine design. He had several papers published on the subject of rocket engines, and was quickly becoming a highly sought-after commodity in the field. One of his papers--"On the Feasibility of Liquid Biopropellant Rockets for Spacecraft Altitude Control"--was even translated into Russian by Dr. Leonid Sedov, the president of the Soviet Space Academy. In need of someone with expertise on liquid-fuel rockets, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, a NASA contractor, hired Williams as a propulsion engineer in 1961.

    At Grumman, Williams managed the development of the Apollo Lunar Module reaction control subsystem. He was fully responsible for the $42 million effort for eight years. He managed the three engineering groups that developed the small rocket motors--they used 100 pounds of thrust in comparison to the 10,500 pounds of the lunar module's main engine--that guided the lunar module, the part of the Apollo spacecraft that actually landed on the moon. It was these engines that enabled the crew members of the Apollo 13 mission to make it safely back to earth after the ship's main rocket exploded in flight.

    According to an account published in African Americans: Voices of Triumph, "With their chief source of propulsion gone and power for their life-support systems dwindling, the crew had to depend on the lunar module's small rockets to get headed back toward earth. Then they had to use William's 16 tiny steering rockets to maneuver the craft to reenter earth's atmosphere at a safe angle. Had the steering rockets not been up to the task, Apollo 13 might have struck the atmosphere at too shallow an angle and caromed off into space to be lost forever or come in too steeply and been incinerated from the friction of a too-rapid descent. Ozzie William's devices proved to be the little engines that could, and the Apollo 13 astronauts splashed down safely in the Pacific [Ocean]."

    Williams went on to a career in marketing at Grumman International (later Northrup Grumman International), including a market survey mission conducted in West Africa in 1973. The following year, he was made a company vice president. After leaving Grumman, he became a marketing professor at St. John's University in Queens, New York, where he had completed an M.B.A. in 1981. Working with students was natural for Williams, who had already been part of a task force that attempted to attract more black students into business- and technology-oriented fields.

    The respect Williams has earned throughout his career has permanently enshrined him as one of the most important African American contributors to science and technology. He has received varied recognition from being featured on a U.S. Department of Energy poster featuring prominent blacks in science to being profiled on Queens Public Television in a one-hour program entitled "O. S. Williams, A Man of Three Careers." Williams has also been happily married throughout most of his career. Together he and his wife have raised three children, one of whom died in 1982. Now in his 80s, Williams is apparently no longer associated with St. John's University of Northrup Grumman International.



    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/...
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  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 01:44:27
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +2
    Game Console Jerry Lawsonhttp://www.wired.com/gamelife...


    Gerald “Jerry” Lawson, creator of the first cartridge-based videogame console, died Saturday morning in a Mountain View, California, hospital, Wired.com has learned. Lawson was 70.

    As an engineer at Fairchild Semiconductor, Lawson designed the electronics of the Fairchild Video Entertainment System, later renamed the Channel F, in 1976.

    Predating the release of Atari’s Video Computer System by a year, the Channel F was the first videogame machine that used interchangeable game cartridges, which Fairchild sold separately. Previous game machines like Atari’s Pong and the Magnavox Odyssey had all their games built into the hardware. Lawson’s pioneering design set the standard for the game consoles of today.

    “Jerry was an amazing personality,” said family friend David Erhart, who broke the news of Lawson’s death Monday on the Digital Press website. “He created part of the videogame industry history in Silicon Valley and it was always a pleasure to hear his stories about back in the day.”

    Much of Lawson’s background is discussed in a wide-ranging interview he gave Vintage Computing and Gaming in 2009.

    A lifelong engineer and tinkerer, Lawson was born in 1940 and grew up in a federal housing project in Queens, New York. As a ...


























    Game Console Jerry Lawsonhttp://www.wired.com/gamelife...


    Gerald “Jerry” Lawson, creator of the first cartridge-based videogame console, died Saturday morning in a Mountain View, California, hospital, Wired.com has learned. Lawson was 70.

    As an engineer at Fairchild Semiconductor, Lawson designed the electronics of the Fairchild Video Entertainment System, later renamed the Channel F, in 1976.

    Predating the release of Atari’s Video Computer System by a year, the Channel F was the first videogame machine that used interchangeable game cartridges, which Fairchild sold separately. Previous game machines like Atari’s Pong and the Magnavox Odyssey had all their games built into the hardware. Lawson’s pioneering design set the standard for the game consoles of today.

    “Jerry was an amazing personality,” said family friend David Erhart, who broke the news of Lawson’s death Monday on the Digital Press website. “He created part of the videogame industry history in Silicon Valley and it was always a pleasure to hear his stories about back in the day.”

    Much of Lawson’s background is discussed in a wide-ranging interview he gave Vintage Computing and Gaming in 2009.

    A lifelong engineer and tinkerer, Lawson was born in 1940 and grew up in a federal housing project in Queens, New York. As a kid, he operated a ham radio; as a teenager he earned money by repairing his neighbors’ television sets.

    In the 1970s, living and working in Silicon Valley, he joined the Homebrew Computer Club, a group of early hackers that included Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

    Lawson’s contributions to videogames began with Demolition Derby, a coin-operated arcade machine that he created in his garage while working at Fairchild.

    “Fairchild found out about it — in fact, it was a big controversy that I had done that. And then, very quietly, they asked me if I wanted to do it for them,” Lawson said in the Vintage Computing interview.

    Although similar machines were in development at Atari and RCA at the time, the console Lawson’s team built for Fairchild was the first cartridge-based gaming system that came to market. Although it seems simple now, making the technology work wasn’t easy.

    “There was a mechanism that allowed you to put the cartridges in without destroying the semiconductors…. We were afraid — we didn’t have statistics on multiple insertion and what it would do, and how we would do it, because it wasn’t done. I mean, think about it: Nobody had the capability of plugging in memory devices in mass quantity like in a consumer product. Nobody.”

    Only 26 cartridges were ever released for Channel F, all simple games like Blackjack, Space War and Bowling. When Atari released its cartridge-based system, Channel F was quickly rendered obsolete. Years later, Lawson started his own company, Videosoft, to produce Atari 2600 cartridges, but only released one, a technician’s tool called Color Bar Generator.

    Last month, the International Game Developers Association honored Lawson’s pioneering efforts at Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

    ‘His workbench had more tools than most people would even know what to do with.’
    “The whole reason I did games was because people said, ‘You can’t do it,’” he told the San Jose Mercury News last month. “I’m one of the guys, if you tell me I can’t do something, I’ll turn around and do it.”

    In later years, Lawson had suffered the severe effects of diabetes. He lost sight in one eye and lost one of his legs to the disease, leaving him confined to a wheelchair. On Wednesday, not feeling well, he was admitted into El Camino Hospital Mountain View.

    “He continued building devices to control telescopes, lasers, tools, etc. up until the day he went to the hospital,” said friend Erhart. “His workbench had more tools than most people would even know what to do with. He taught me quite a bit and I’ll miss him sorely.”

    At 6:15 a.m. Saturday, Lawson died after apparently suffering a heart attack. He is survived by his wife, son and daughter. The family is planning a memorial service in mid-May.

    http://www.wired.com/gamelife...

    Jerry Lawson Game Console
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  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 01:45:48
  • Jacobob... Latti I... 2012/03/13 01:53:47
    Jacobobryan
    Yea about that! Thats more great propoganda brought to you by media and the U.S. Government....lets ignore all the great fighter squadrons of ww1 and ww2 and lets focus on the Tuskegee Airmen because they were black! I assure you they were by far knowhere near one of the greatest squadrans of ww2 nor any of them came close to an of the great Fighter Aces..lol...thats just more black propoganda to try to undermine white history
  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 01:56:31
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +3
    Haha!!!!!!!!!!!

    After receiving a PH.D. in physics from the University of Chicago at age 19, Wilkins studied mechanical engineering at New York University, taught mathematics at Tuskegee University, and took part in the research that led to the development of the atomic bomb during World War 2. From 1946 to 1970 he a senior mathematician for the Nuclear Development Corporation of America and a physicist with the General Dynamics Corporation. In 1970 , Wilkins was appointed Distinguished Professor of Applied Mathematical Physics at Howard University. He is known for developing techniques for measuring the absorption of gamma radiation emitted by the sun and other nuclear sources.


    (1923-2011 )


    Reference; Schomburg Center



    Additional Information; African American mathematician andnuclear scientist, who gained first fame on entering the University of Chicago at age 13, becoming its youngest ever student. [2] [3] [4] His intelligence led to him being referred to as a "negro genius" in the media. As part of a widely varied and notable career, Wilkins contributed to the Manhattan Project during the Second World War. He also gained fame working in and conducting nuclear physics research in both academia and industry. He wrote numerous scientific papers, served in various important p...









    Haha!!!!!!!!!!!

    After receiving a PH.D. in physics from the University of Chicago at age 19, Wilkins studied mechanical engineering at New York University, taught mathematics at Tuskegee University, and took part in the research that led to the development of the atomic bomb during World War 2. From 1946 to 1970 he a senior mathematician for the Nuclear Development Corporation of America and a physicist with the General Dynamics Corporation. In 1970, Wilkins was appointed Distinguished Professor of Applied Mathematical Physics at Howard University. He is known for developing techniques for measuring the absorption of gamma radiation emitted by the sun and other nuclear sources.


    Wilkins J Ernest Jr (1923-2011 )


    Reference; Schomburg Center



    Additional Information;
    African American mathematician andnuclear scientist, who gained first fame on entering the University of Chicago at age 13, becoming its youngest ever student.[2][3][4] His intelligence led to him being referred to as a "negro genius" in the media.

    As part of a widely varied and notable career, Wilkins contributed to the Manhattan Project during the Second World War. He also gained fame working in and conducting nuclear physics research in both academia and industry. He wrote numerous scientific papers, served in various important posts, earned several significant awards and helped recruit minority students into the sciences.[2][5][6]

    During his studies and various careers he was not untouched by the prevalent racism that existed for much of his life.[2] In 1940 Wilkins completed his B.Sc. in mathematics at age 17, then his M.Sc. at age 18, and finally went on to complete a Ph.D in mathematics at the University of Chicago, graduating in 1942 at age 19.[4] In order to improve his rapport with the nuclear engineers reporting to him, Wilkins later received both Bachelor's and Master's degrees in mechanical engineering from New York University in 1957 and 1960,[2][7] thus earning five science degrees during his life.

    After initially failing to secure a research position at his alma mater in Chicago, Wilkins taught mathematics from 1943 to 1944 at the Tuskegee Institute (now called Tuskegee University) in Alabama.[2]

    In 1944 he returned to the University of Chicago where he served first as an associate mathematical physicist and then as a physicist in its Metallurgical Laboratory, as part of the Manhattan Project.[4] Working under the direction of Arthur Holly Compton and Enrico Fermi, Wilkins researched the extraction of fissionable nuclear materials, but was not told of the research group's ultimate goal until after the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Wilkins was the codiscoverer or discoverer of a number of phenomena in physics such as the Wilkins effect, plus the Wigner-Wilkins and Wilkins spectra.[7]

    Wilkins then continued to teach mathematics and conduct significant research in neutron absorption with physicist Eugene Wigner, including the development of its mathematical models.[2][4] He would also later help design and develop nuclear reactors for electrical power generation, becoming part owner of one such company.[4] n 1970 Wilkins went on to serve Howard University as its distinguished professor of Applied Mathematical Physicsand also founded the university's new PhD program in mathematics.[4] During his tenure at Howard he undertook a sabbatical position as a visiting scientist at Argonne National Laboratory from 1976 to 1977.[2]

    From 1974 to 1975 Wilkins served as president of the American Nuclear Society[8][4] and in 1976 became the second African American to be elected to the National Academy of Engineering.[9][4]

    From 1990 Wilkins lived and worked in Atlanta, Georgia as a Distinguished Professor of Applied Mathematics andMathematical Physics at Clark Atlanta University, and retired again for his last time in 2003.[2][9]

    Throughout his years of research Wilkins published more than 100 papers on a variety of subjects, includingdifferential geometry, linear differential equations, integrals, nuclear engineering, gamma radiation shielding andoptics, garnering numerous professional and scientific awards along the way.[2][10]



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...



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  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 01:47:28
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +2
    (1856-1910) Born in Ohio, Woods worked at a variety of manual jobs while studying electrical and mechanical engineering in the evenings. In 1884, he was able to start his own machine shop, the Woods Electrical Company, in Cincinnati. In 1890, he moved the company to New York and remained there for the rest of his life. In all, Woods patented 35 devices, including the a steam-boiler furnace, telephone transmitter, a railway telegraph, a galvanic battery, an overhead conducting system for electric railways, an automatic safety cutout for electrical circuits and an automatic circuit-breaking apparatus. He also patented an automatic air brake that was purchased by Westinghouse in 1902.

    Reference; Schomburg Center

    Self-Educated;

    Granville T Woods literally learned his skills on the job. Attending school in Columbus until age 10, he served an apprenticeship in a machine shop and learned the trades of machinist and blacksmith. During his youth he also went to night school and took private lessons. Although he had to leave formal school at age ten, Granville T Woods realized that learning and education were essential to developing critical skills that would allow him to express his creativity with machinery. In 1872, Granville T Woods obtained a job as a fireman on the Danville and...



    (1856-1910) Born in Ohio, Woods worked at a variety of manual jobs while studying electrical and mechanical engineering in the evenings. In 1884, he was able to start his own machine shop, the Woods Electrical Company, in Cincinnati. In 1890, he moved the company to New York and remained there for the rest of his life. In all, Woods patented 35 devices, including the a steam-boiler furnace, telephone transmitter, a railway telegraph, a galvanic battery, an overhead conducting system for electric railways, an automatic safety cutout for electrical circuits and an automatic circuit-breaking apparatus. He also patented an automatic air brake that was purchased by Westinghouse in 1902.

    Reference; Schomburg CenterWoods Granville T

    Self-Educated;

    Granville T Woods literally learned his skills on the job. Attending school in Columbus until age 10, he served an apprenticeship in a machine shop and learned the trades of machinist and blacksmith. During his youth he also went to night school and took private lessons. Although he had to leave formal school at age ten, Granville T Woods realized that learning and education were essential to developing critical skills that would allow him to express his creativity with machinery.

    In 1872, Granville T Woods obtained a job as a fireman on the Danville and Southern railroad in Missouri, eventually becoming an engineer. He invested his spare time in studying electronics. In 1874, he moved to Springfield, Illinois, and worked in a rolling mill. In 1878, he took a job aboard the Ironsides, a British steamer, and, within two years, became Chief Engineer of the steamer. Finally, his travels and experiences led him to settle in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he became a person dedicated to modernizing the railroad.

    http://inventors.about.com/od...

    (more)
  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 02:00:15
  • Latti I... Jacobob... 2012/03/13 02:02:37
  • Aly Hart 2012/02/24 04:36:07
  • Níl mé leat 2012/02/24 04:30:06
    Níl mé leat
    +3
    I am sick of seeing so many young kids of all backgrounds throwing away opportunities because they don't realize the impact of the internet. It's fine to say whatever you want online just remember that the world is going to see it/hear it and it will always be there and it will follow you.
  • La 2012/02/23 07:36:43
    La
    +5
    Not as bad as that woman on the train in London. I like how she used the word "eligible" when she was probably going for "legible" which is the wrong word anyway and she needed "coherent". So 10/10 for irony there.

    But anyway, in her attempt to clarify that she didn't think all black people were the same, she shouldn't have said "there are black people and then there are n*ggers"

    Too far....Anyway, I got bored halfway through, so maybe it gets worse.
  • DiViews... La 2012/02/23 20:45:23
    DiViews2014
    +4
    I agree. I made it through 1:56 sec of this ignorance.
  • Darnel 2012/02/22 23:01:12
    Darnel
    +2
    *Comment*
    And there are those who will defend them for saying such things.

    Mostly because the "common knowledge" of white racists who think this way have little to do with reality.

    I think it a sadder statement that they are only sorry because they got flack for painting an entire group with a brush.

    Sigh.
  • sally 2012/02/22 03:52:55
    sally
    +6
    These girls are sooooo stupid. Then they try to soften it up by answering questions? It didn't really work out for them.
  • Fannie 2012/02/22 03:45:57 (edited)
    Fannie
    +3
    enroll these girls in school at Jackson, Mississippi. Jackson Mississippi HS
  • rudeboy 2012/02/22 00:39:39
    rudeboy
    +5
    Wow.....those girls were very deep in racist waters......even racist adults dont go that hard on racism.....

    I dont think it would be easy forgiving them. Time heals though
  • Shammy 2012/02/22 00:35:21
  • Melizmatic 2012/02/22 00:25:10
  • Latti I... Melizmatic 2012/02/22 00:28:30

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