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Students in Colorado read Pledge of Allegiance in Arabic. Should they?

Drue-AFCL 2013/02/01 11:57:11
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  • jubil8 BN-0 PON 2013/02/01 15:56:42
    No Way
    jubil8 BN-0 PON
    +9
    Saying it over the intercom should be in ENGLISH. That's public, and not all students know every language. We recited the Pledge in French class as an exercise, not every day. And when I said it, I was NOT saying the Pledge of Allegiance, I was practicing French (and being corrected on my accent). Big mental difference imo.

    If ALL students say the Pledge in ALL the languages, it's more like an exercise in language studies than a nod to any ethnic group. Is the Principal going to add Russian or Mandarin Chinese? If not, keep language studies in language classes.

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  • T. James H 2013/03/15 03:27:36
  • Mj PINKYFINGERDOWN 2013/02/19 20:11:11
  • ☺Sunrae☺산럐☺ 2013/02/09 22:01:11
    YEs
    ☺Sunrae☺산럐☺
    There is no national language, so why should it matter what language we say the pledge in as long as we say it?

    In fact, I think it's be cool if we said in a different language every once in a while. I think those who's first language is NOT English while be a lot more comfortable with that.
  • BIGNEVERMO 2013/02/08 19:53:01 (edited)
    YEs
    BIGNEVERMO
    ""[V]erbal cacophony is . . . not a sign of weakness but of

    strength."' The United States Constitution does not stipulate that

    English is the official language of the United States.2 In fact, the

    Constitution itself was originally published in several languages

    including English, German and French.' As a country founded by

    immigrants for immigrants,4 there has been a general intolerance

    for mono-linguistic ratification.5"

    "I Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15 (1971).
    2 See 9 JOURNALS OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS 1774-1789 1088 (Worthington
    Chauncey Ford ed., 1907) (stating non-designation of one "official" language in Colonial
    America was no oversight by Framers of Constitution as it recognized presence of various
    European ethnic groups and existing Native American languages); see also Harris v. Rivera
    Cruz, 710 F. Supp. 29, 31 (D.P.R. 1989) (stating that there is no official language in United
    States "and if prudence and wisdom... prevail there never shall be. . .")...

    SOURCE:http://scholarship.law...
  • Psyblade 2013/02/08 02:33:46 (edited)
    Undecided
    Psyblade
    +1
    who the hell cares

    It's just a language. Just because the pledge was done in Arabic doesn't mean that kids are going to start being converted to Islam or anything else like that. Calm down.
  • Anna 2013/02/05 02:56:29
    YEs
    Anna
    +1
    Oh no! How dare they expose children to multiple languages! They are still Pledging Allegiance to the flag, they are just exploring many different languages to do it in. After all, America is the Melting Pot, blending cultures together. Arabic is a beautiful language. Just because a few of it's speakers are terrorists doesn't men the language itself will bomb us.
  • KarenInKenoshaWisconsin 2013/02/05 00:12:19
    Undecided
    KarenInKenoshaWisconsin
    +1
    It was done in the context that it was recited in a number of languages, Arabic being only one. In that context, it's fine. It was done in an institution of learning and US American students should hear and learn multiple languages. This and future generations should put to rest the joke that "What is someone called that speaks only one language....American". Also, Arabic does not equal terrorist. Terrorism is a behavior, not a language.
  • krayzrick 2013/02/04 20:54:54
    No Way
    krayzrick
    +1
    Let the Arabs learn how to say it in English.
  • Drue-AFCL krayzrick 2013/02/08 19:07:20
    Drue-AFCL
    +1
    Tfhey would not say it at all.
  • KilrQueen 2013/02/04 20:48:39
    Undecided
    KilrQueen
    +2
    Why are they reading the Pledge in Arabic? Is this going to be this countries new language?
  • ziad 2013/02/04 20:00:56
    YEs
    ziad
    There must be a convergence of culture between civilizations
  • krayzrick ziad 2013/02/04 20:55:48
  • ziad krayzrick 2013/02/04 21:10:21
    ziad
    +1
    Sir order to understand peoples religions convergence of cooperation, including
    There will incomprehensible things, especially in which (terrorism, for example) and now here in Jordan held a forum and for one week and all religions for convergence of civilizations
  • mikeyavelli 2013/02/04 17:42:50
    No Way
    mikeyavelli
    +1
    why arabic? is it because barack hussein obama prefers it to his native kenyan or secondary english language? and what about his huge voting block of hispanics?
    just another lefty attempt to elevate the culture of another country over ours, as if every one else is morally and intellectually superior. or at least, they want it that way.
  • Greg Saunders 2013/02/04 12:01:20
    Undecided
    Greg Saunders
    I'm surprised so many said no, speaking as an immigrant myself and a hypocrite who speaks little Spanish I have to say yes. Since many Spanish speak English as well most expats won't learn it either and it causes all sorts of problems in everyday life.

    But at the same time people like myself wouldn't think of it as a human right and object to it being forced on us, it's a small issue to an expat but a far larger one to those who have to deal with lazier people and affects democracy over all. We can't really be accepted as the same while we separate ourselves by not communicating our needs effectively.

    The point made about the pledge and understanding what it means can be countered by a simple test, you can learn the pledge without knowing English but tests can't be easily defeated if well thought out.
  • krayzrick Greg Sa... 2013/02/04 20:56:44
    krayzrick
    +1
    "When in America, do as Americans do..." ENGLISH
  • kiote1963 2013/02/04 08:00:38
    No Way
    kiote1963
    +2
    NO NO a thousand times NO...English ONLY...not French, Spanish...just English..PERIOD!
  • Swan Eshdeh 2013/02/03 22:47:50
    YEs
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    why not?
  • krayzrick Swan Es... 2013/02/04 20:57:33
    krayzrick
    If you have to be told, your not worth the effort it takes...
  • Swan Es... krayzrick 2013/02/04 21:02:43
    Swan Eshdeh
    my question doesn't need an answer
  • krayzrick Swan Es... 2013/02/04 21:03:48
    krayzrick
    "question" "doesn't need an answer"....no wonder you don't get it.
  • Swan Es... krayzrick 2013/02/04 21:08:00
    Swan Eshdeh
    whatever...
  • beachbum krayzrick 2013/02/04 21:05:47
    beachbum
    +2
    He's from Jordan.............
  • krayzrick beachbum 2013/02/04 21:07:42
    krayzrick
    +2
    yeh..I saw that :)
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 21:07:51
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    she is *
    is that possible you didn't see the "pink female" ?
    and yes i am ,and proud got a problem ?
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 21:16:58
    beachbum
    +1
    No, saw the country.........people think I'm a guy, so it's no big deal - I just move on. Nothing wrong with being proud of being Jordanian...........it's just that I doubt seriously that in Jordan or any other the other middle eastern countries, if there is a pledge, students would be allowed, encouraged, or even taught, to say it in English.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 21:25:29 (edited)
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    bingo !! you are right.
    but to me ...i don't have a problem that other people to a pledge in my language .
    see that my point of view.nothing so dangerous about it.before you both start to attack .

    and i am not stupid ..."he is from Jordan " means :" look don't bother she is from there"
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 21:39:32
    beachbum
    +1
    I never said you were stupid - I was implying that unless you have lived here, you don't fully understand this culture, as I would not understand yours unless I had lived there. What I said was not meant as a 'put down', and so since it came across that way, I apologize. This country, unfortunately, has found itself in battle, one that I fear is not going to end well..........many people do not care what is best for the country, they only want their 'side' to win. Personally, I see no reason for the pledge to this country to be in any language than English..........nor would I see a reason for students to pledge in your country anything other than your language.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 21:48:13 (edited)
    Swan Eshdeh
    +2
    i see.
    and i really understand .


    but when ever these "Arab or Muslim "words mentioned, you won't find much respect..its like these words provok people to be unrespectful specially toward us.

    and i want to say English still not the formal language in the US.
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 21:58:04
    beachbum
    +1
    No, English is not the formal language...........but it should be. It has created a lot of problems, and cost more when things have to be done in different languages. There is the story of a Chinese woman, who came here to Houston, learned the language, became a citizen, and opened a little grocery store in her neighborhood. She complained one day that she guessed she'd have to learn Spanish because her customers refused to learn English.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 22:08:57
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    oh ! that's really depressing.

    so why they don't want to make it the formal language ?
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 22:16:20
    beachbum
    +1
    Because many politicans want the vote of those who are unwilling to learn the language.......the politcans are basically, in my opinion, 'buying' their votes by giving them what they want - that is why this government gives so much stuff away - buying votes.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 22:18:25
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    i see.
    so what shall you do regarding that as Americans ?
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 22:28:44
    beachbum
    +1
    I vote and support the people who have shared views. Sadly, 'politics' have gotten bad, and so many are only interested in gaining more power, more money for themselves, and will spend a lot of money to buy elections. As I said, I fear things are not going to end well...........however, that being said, many Americans are starting to take a stand against the things we see happening. The 'American' spirit is strong. We want this country to be 'the land of the free and the home of the brave'.
    Also, I am a Christian, so I pray for this country. The issues/challenges are many............
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/04 22:32:49
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    ok i see. i hope the best for you ma'am in you endeavors.
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/04 23:10:47
    beachbum
    Thnx.

    Have a totally change of topic question. Have you been to Petra? I'd love to see it someday..............it looks so AWESOME.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/05 10:21:33
    Swan Eshdeh
    +1
    you are welcome,yes i noticed we have changed it (haha).
    yes i have been there 2 times,and indeed its very awesome.

    but you know what? as i love this country and its very beautiful ,even the hell in Jordan is heaven ,look at its name "Jordan " just so beautiful ,still Jordan has no luck we suffer from refugees from the neighbours millions of them .that burden us so much ,and you know we don't have strong economy.even tourism that we used to have much from it,...we affected because of out neighbours problems....
    so you can see.
  • beachbum Swan Es... 2013/02/05 15:21:00
    beachbum
    +1
    Yes, I do understand.
  • Swan Es... beachbum 2013/02/05 20:05:23
  • BIGNEVERMO Swan Es... 2013/02/08 18:54:04
    BIGNEVERMO
    Because this is a "melting pot" country...at one time there were about 20 languages spoken here in the US...we have the freedom here to speak what languages we know and want to use. other opinions notwithstanding!
    "Opponents of moves to make English the official language of the United States frequently suspect that English-only advocates are motivated by more than political idealism. This suspicion is certainly justified by the historical record. For the past two centuries, proponents of official-English have sounded two separate themes, one rational and patriotic, the other emotional and racist. The Enlightenment belief that language and nation are inextricably intertwined, coupled with the chauvinist notion that English is a language particularly suited to democratically constituted societies, are convincing to many Americans who find discrimination on non-linguistic grounds thoroughly reprehensible (see Baron, 1990). More prominent though, throughout American history, have been the nativist attacks on minority languages and their speakers: Native Americans, Asians, the French, Germans, Jews and Hispanics, to name only the most frequently targeted groups.

    The English-only nativists who attacked the Germans used arguments similar to those heard nowadays against newer immigrants
    ...















    Because this is a "melting pot" country...at one time there were about 20 languages spoken here in the US...we have the freedom here to speak what languages we know and want to use. other opinions notwithstanding!
    "Opponents of moves to make English the official language of the United States frequently suspect that English-only advocates are motivated by more than political idealism. This suspicion is certainly justified by the historical record. For the past two centuries, proponents of official-English have sounded two separate themes, one rational and patriotic, the other emotional and racist. The Enlightenment belief that language and nation are inextricably intertwined, coupled with the chauvinist notion that English is a language particularly suited to democratically constituted societies, are convincing to many Americans who find discrimination on non-linguistic grounds thoroughly reprehensible (see Baron, 1990). More prominent though, throughout American history, have been the nativist attacks on minority languages and their speakers: Native Americans, Asians, the French, Germans, Jews and Hispanics, to name only the most frequently targeted groups.

    The English-only nativists who attacked the Germans used arguments similar to those heard nowadays against newer immigrants
    The English-only nativists who attacked the Germans used arguments similar to those heard nowadays against newer immigrants. Benjamin Franklin considered the Pennsylvania Germans to be a “swarthy” racial group distinct from the English majority in the colony. In 1751 he complained, “Why should the Palatine Boors be suffered to swarm into our Settlements, and by herding together establish their Language and Manners to the exclusion of ours? Why should Pennsylvania, founded by the English, become a Colony of Aliens, who will shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of our Anglifying them, and will never adopt our Language or Customs, any more than they can acquire our Complexion?” (The papers of Benjamin Franklin. Ed. Leonard W. Labaree. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1959. vol 4:234).
    The Germans were accused by other eighteenth-century Anglos of laziness, illiteracy, clannishness, a reluctance to assimilate, excessive fertility, and Catholicism. They were even blamed for the severe Pennsylvania winters. (Feer 1952, 403; Mittelberger 1898, 104). Most irritating to Pennsylvania’s English-firsters in the latter 1700s was German language loyalty, although it was clear that, despite community efforts to preserve their language, Germans were adopting English and abandoning German at a rate that should have impressed the rest of the English-speaking population.

    Anti-German sentiment spread along with German immigration, and the nation as a whole resisted both the German bilingual schools that were established in parts of the Midwest in the 19th century and the common practise of publishing legal notices in German American newspapers. On a number of occasions the U.S. Congress again rejected motions to print laws or other documents in German as well as English. The motions were often treated jocularly and were shouted down amidst racist cries of, “What! In the Cherokee? [and in] the Old Congo language!” (Congressional Globe 1844, 7)

    Antagonism toward Germans and their language resurfaced in the Midwest in the late 1880s and early 1890s, and again across the country during and after World War I. Between 1917 and 1922 most of the states dropped German from their school curricula. Nebraska's open meeting law of 1919 forbade the use of foreign languages in public, and in 1918 Governor Harding of Iowa proclaimed that “English should and must be the only medium of instruction in public, private, denominational and other similar schools. Conversation in public places, on trains, and over the telephone should be in the English language. Let those who cannot speak or understand the English language conduct their religious worship in their home.” (New York Times, 18 June 1918, p. 12). Such attitudes had a chilling effect on language use. As many as eighteen thousand people were charged in the Midwest during and immediately following World War I with violating the English-only statutes. (Crawford 1989, 23.)

    The anti-German school laws were declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1923
    The anti-German school laws were declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1923. In Meyer v. Nebraska, the court ruled that “the protection of the Constitution extends to all,—to those who speak other languages as well as to those born with English on the tongue.” (262 U.S. 390). Similar anti-Japanese laws were invalidated by the court in Farrington v. Tokushige in 1927 (273 U.S. 284). And the high court reaffirmed the states' responsibility to educate non-English speakers effectively in Lau v. Nichols (1974)(414 U.S. Reports 563), though the court did not specify how this was to be accomplished."
    ..."Official-English is an emotional issue for many people, involving questions of patriotism as well as racism, language loyalty as well as assimilation. Supporters and opponents of the ELA almost came to blows during a discussion of the subject on the “Donahue” show in Miami a few years ago. Adding to the complexity of the issue is the problem that language legislation, at least in the United States, is difficult if not impossible to enforce. In 1906, Pres. Theodore Roosevelt ordered the federal government to adopt simplified spelling in its official publications. This move generated so much resistance that Roosevelt softly withdrew his order. (see Baron, 1982) The New Mexico constitution, establishing English as the new state’s official language, was ratified by means of bilingual ballots. A 1923 Illinois law making American, rather than English, the official language of that state was quietly amended in 1969 because Illinois residents continued to speak and teach English in defiance or ignorance of the statute. The English Language Amendment, if it is passed, may also prove to be more of a symbol than an enforceable statute, though many people fear that it could become a dangerous tool for linguistic and cultural repression. In any case, though, the ELA seems one final, and to some observers, paranoid, attempt to make up for the perceived humiliation of 1795, when English reportedly came within a hair’s-breadth of losing out as the official language of the United States in a vote which never really took place."

    I think people should learn the English language...I live in Miami where we have three prominent languages...in order of use:
    Spanish
    English
    Creole
    we just had three languages on the ballot...it doesn't bother me...what bothers me is when people just start speaking to me in Spanish...without even trying their English...if that happens...I dont help them and I wont use my Spanish...even they try English...I will help them by speaking Spanish...I don't think we need to make English an official language...it can be divisive in certain areas...and unnecessary in the rest.
    That said...immigrants need to learn English as it will help them out in the long run...but this is the US and we have freedom in the form of the 1st Amendment.
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