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Should the ten commandments of The Holy Bible be displayed in court houses and other government venues?

Deborah Sampson 2009/06/21 18:03:57
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Whether you agree with the premise that the ten commandments are good guidelines for living, there is also the subject of the division of church and state. What do you think about it?
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  • X Weatherman 2009/06/27 19:18:15
    Other, please comment.
    X Weatherman
  • Deborah... X Weath... 2009/06/27 19:58:17
    Deborah Sampson
    Awesome video. Question 1 is the best!
  • X Weath... Deborah... 2009/06/27 20:55:18
    X Weatherman
    Thanks ... saw some interesting stuff last night, also.
    Search Youtube for Anthony Sutton ... there is a playlist ...
    It will give you plenty of reasons why everyone should get their conservative/liberal views out of the way and, as the great band Canned Heat once said, "Work Together".
    The BAD GUYS are.
  • RJ~PWCM~JLA 2009/06/23 00:53:47
    Other, please comment.
    RJ~PWCM~JLA
    +3
    Yes. Our laws are derived in part from the 10 Commandments. We should not abandon or forget our roots.

    And even Sonia Satamayor agrees that ours is a Judeo-Christian tradition.
  • Common Sense Conservative 2009/06/22 23:24:59
    Yes. God's law should be our law.
    Common Sense Conservative
    +3
    Absolutely 100%. If you think otherwise you are scared of the truth.
  • Goldie 2009/06/22 23:21:08
    Other, please comment.
    Goldie
    +1
    Well, unless some rich person is going to pay to have them removed or pay to add more of them, then I say leave it alone. It will come out of tax dollars otherwise.
  • socokid 2009/06/22 19:35:59 (edited)
    No. It's unconstitutional. Our laws come before religious laws.
    socokid
    +2
    A few of the Christian's "commandments" would directly affront freedom of religion (almost the entire first half of it, 1-4 at least). So, at this point in time, spending public monies to construct 10 C monuments should be killed.

    Keep the ones constructed at a time when NOT being a Christian was considered blasphemous. ;-) They didn't know any better.
  • Kirra Blackhart... Now even... 2009/06/22 06:43:12
    No. It's unconstitutional. Our laws come before religious laws.
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +2
    Which version of the 10 commandments? The original ones?

    1. Thou shalt worship no other god (For the Lord is a jealous god).
    2. Thou shalt make thee no molten gods.
    3. The feast of unleavened bread shalt thou keep in the month when the ear is on the corn.
    4. All the first-born are mine.
    5. Six days shalt thou work, but on the seventh thou shalt rest.
    6. Thou shalt observe the feast of weeks, even of the first fruits of the wheat harvest, and the feast of in gathering at the year's end.
    7. Thou shalt not offer the blood of my sacrifice with leavened bread.
    8. The fat of my feast shall not remain all night until the morning.
    9. The first of the first fruits of thy ground thou shalt bring unto the house of the Lord thy God.
    10. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother's milk.
  • Common ... Kirra B... 2009/06/22 23:47:41
    Common Sense Conservative
    +2
    More like this:::


    1."I am the LORD your God You shall have no other gods before Me..."

    2."Do not make an image or any likeness of what is in the heavens above..."

    3."Do not swear falsely by the name of the LORD..."

    4."Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy"

    5."Honor your father and your mother..."

    6."Do not murder"

    7."Do not commit adultery."

    8."Do not steal."

    9."Do not bear false witness against your neighbor"

    10."Do not covet your neighbor's wife"
  • Kirra B... Common ... 2009/06/23 09:22:02 (edited)
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +1
    So the commandments as written by man and not by "God".

    The modern commandments are just a plagiarised version of the Divine Principles of Ma-at, just another thing that was borrowed from the pre-existing religions.
  • Common ... Kirra B... 2009/06/23 16:31:47
    Common Sense Conservative
    +1
    These are the ten commandments of Moses,
  • Kirra B... Common ... 2009/06/24 09:21:56
    Kirra Blackhart... Now even more cynical, bitter & twisted BN12
    +1
    In Exodus 20, "God" tells Moses the Ten Commandments that you have written above. When Moses returned to his people however he found them worshipping Baal, and cracked a hissy fit and broke the tablets.

    So Moses went back up the mountain with another set of tablets, which "God" himself inscribed. "I will write on these tablets the words that were on the first tablets which you broke" These second set are in "God"s own writing - as listed in Exodus 34.

    So - the ten commandments of Moses OR the ten commandments of "God"?
  • Munchie ~Unbreakable 2009/06/21 23:19:13
    Yes. God's law should be our law.
    Munchie ~Unbreakable
    +5
    Personally I would love to see them everywhere! But I know that is not possible these days.
  • ashdragon88 2009/06/21 22:09:53
    Other, please comment.
    ashdragon88
    +1
    While they have good intentions, its not fair to showcase the rules for one religion of you do not showcase the rules from all religions and that would just be overkill....lets just keep it to the laws that are on the books, put up your ten commandment posters, and call it a day
  • Pele Emerging 2009/06/21 21:03:10
    Other, please comment.
    Pele Emerging
    +3
    They are good guidelines, but unless you want to display good guidelines from all cultures and religions, they don't belong there.
  • kmay 2009/06/21 20:47:23
    Other, please comment.
    kmay
    +2
    American law would be extremely different without the Ten Commandments.

    Whether or not they are physically displayed really makes little difference as they have already played a pivotal role it our laws development.
  • socokid kmay 2009/06/22 19:43:07
    socokid
    +1
    I could not disagree more. Sorry.

    Commandments 1-4 are about worshipping God. There is nothing in the laws that say I have to do this... in fact, the First Amendment specifically REJECTS the first few commandments of Christian beliefs. Working the sabbath.. really?

    The only things left are basic morality laws that are gained with or without the 10 commandments. Don't kill, don't steal, don't cheat on your wife. Are you saying we would not have laws against these things if it weren't for the 10 commandments?
  • RJ~PWCM... socokid 2009/06/23 00:57:14
    RJ~PWCM~JLA
    Basic morality is not just "gained", as you say. It must come from somewhere. It cannot NOT man-made, because if it was, then man can change it, and there would be no agreement on what actually constitutes "basic morality".
  • Deborah... RJ~PWCM... 2009/06/23 01:02:03
    Deborah Sampson
    There is no agreement. That is why the world is so morally divided. Perhaps "good" values come from knowing what is best for our own survival.
  • socokid Deborah... 2009/06/23 13:04:57
    socokid
    +1
    Exactly... there are very strong evolutionary arguments for basic moralities (killing, stealing, etc...). However, we need to only look at some atheistic communities to see that morality certainly is not derived from religion.

    Personally, after much reading, I do not believe a highly social and communicative species such as our own would have survived very long without these instillments.
  • Charlie 2009/06/21 20:05:08
    No. It's unconstitutional. Our laws come before religious laws.
    Charlie
    +2
    It would assume that everyone was of the Abrahamic faiths.We are also a country of Buddhist,Wiccans,Hindu,
    ans non-believers.I will always fight to keep religion out of the hands of government.
  • Anouser 2009/06/21 19:02:28 (edited)
    No. It's unconstitutional. Our laws come before religious laws.
    Anouser
    +1
    First, not everyone is Christian nor Jewish. Second, separation of church and state. Third, freedom of religion, BUT, freedom from religion. This is what our forefathers built this country on, and to steer clear of the intentions of equality, not to give into religious tyranny. Are we becoming the new old England that some of our ancestors have so desperately escaped from? I hope not.
  • reed67 2009/06/21 18:31:21 (edited)
    Other, please comment.
    reed67
    +1
    I don't care if it's displayed whatever helps you get though life. Personally I want to see the 10 Commadments made into law. As a Pagan it would be intresting.
  • Anouser reed67 2009/06/21 18:57:07
    Anouser
    There would be a lot of people in jail...and I'm not going to jail w/o a fight for not having the Judeo-Christian god.
  • reed67 Anouser 2009/06/21 19:06:22
    reed67
    +2
    Chrsitians would be fighting over which is the right denomations which version of the bible is right Etc. They would wipe each out in less then a year.
  • Anouser reed67 2009/06/21 19:20:44
    Anouser
    Lol. That would be an interesting watch.
  • reed67 Anouser 2009/06/21 19:22:21 (edited)
    reed67
    +1
    Pretty much.

    More to the point who would keep track of who is & who is not breaking those laws? Everyone lies that law alone would wipe each out in 6 months or less.
  • X Weath... reed67 2009/06/21 19:47:18
    X Weatherman
    +1
    There's an idea ... if I wasn't such a christian man ... with the little c ... I might change my mind

    LOL

    X
  • X Weath... Anouser 2009/06/21 19:46:20
    X Weatherman
    +1
    They wouldn't be in jail friend, if we go ahead and make them law ... the punishments are spelled out too.
    Such as stoning to death at the gates of the city ... and other wonderful Judeo-Christian punishments.

    Right with you ...

    peace,
    X
  • Georgie's Girl 2009/06/21 18:30:14
    Yes. God's law should be our law.
    Georgie's Girl
    +2
    The only problem with this is the minimum amount of objectors who try to have everything their way. This country was founded based on religious freedoms, and posting the 10 commandments harms no one. If you don't want to read them, don't read them. There are four commandments that really have a right to be there (#6, 7, 8, & 9)

    10 commandments harms read read commandments 6 7 8 9
  • Georgie... Georgie... 2009/06/21 18:35:21
    Georgie's Girl
    +3
    Separation of Church and State. A History Lesson...

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you walk up the steps to the Building which houses the U S Supreme Court You can see near the top of the building a row Of the world's law givers and each one is Facing one in the middle who is facing forward With a full frontal view. It is Moses and he is holding the Ten Commandments!

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you enter the Supreme Court courtroom, the two huge oak doors have the Ten Commandments Engraved on each lower portion of each door

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you sit inside the courtroom, you can see the wall, right above where the Supreme Court Judges sit, a display of the Ten Commandments!

    DID YOU KNOW?
    There are Bible verses etched in stone all Over the Federal Buildings and Monuments in Washington, D. C.

    DID YOU KNOW?
    James Madison, the fourth president, known as 'The Father of Our Constitution' made the Following statement:

    'We have staked the whole of all our political Institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government, upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to The Ten Commandments of God.'

    DID YOU KNOW?
    Patrick Henry, that patriot and Founding Father of our country said:
    'It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was...'












    ''
    Separation of Church and State. A History Lesson...

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you walk up the steps to the Building which houses the U S Supreme Court You can see near the top of the building a row Of the world's law givers and each one is Facing one in the middle who is facing forward With a full frontal view. It is Moses and he is holding the Ten Commandments!

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you enter the Supreme Court courtroom, the two huge oak doors have the Ten Commandments Engraved on each lower portion of each door

    DID YOU KNOW?
    As you sit inside the courtroom, you can see the wall, right above where the Supreme Court Judges sit, a display of the Ten Commandments!

    DID YOU KNOW?
    There are Bible verses etched in stone all Over the Federal Buildings and Monuments in Washington, D. C.

    DID YOU KNOW?
    James Madison, the fourth president, known as 'The Father of Our Constitution' made the Following statement:

    'We have staked the whole of all our political Institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government, upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to The Ten Commandments of God.'

    DID YOU KNOW?
    Patrick Henry, that patriot and Founding Father of our country said:
    'It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded not by religionists but by Christians, not on religions but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ.'

    DID YOU KNOW?
    Every session of Congress begins with a prayer by a paid preacher, whose salary has been paid By the taxpayer since 1777.

    DID YOU KNOW?
    Fifty-two of the fifty-five founders of the Constitution were members of the established Orthodox churches in the colonies.

    DID YOU KNOW?
    Thomas Jefferson worried that the Courts would overstep their authority and instead of interpreting the law would begin making law an oligarchy? The rule of few over many.

    DID YOU KNOW?
    The very first Supreme Court Justice, John Jay, said:
    'Americans should select and prefer Christians As their rulers.'
    How then, have we gotten to the point that Everything we have done for 220 years in this Country is now suddenly wrong and Unconstitutional?
    (more)
  • Elemenopee Georgie... 2009/06/21 19:47:34
  • kmay Elemenopee 2009/06/21 20:38:59
    kmay
    Explain the un truths
  • X Weath... Elemenopee 2009/06/21 21:50:19
    X Weatherman
    Yes, it's a fact that the majority, by far, of the founding fathers were deists ... Patrick Henry was the only evangelist on the crew ...
    Deists believe there is a single god ... and that's about it.

    Because of people like Georgie though our children believe that rot which undermines one of the key reasons our nation was founded with the rules it was founded on i.e., "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . ."

    People had been living 'over here' for about a hundred years leading up to 1776 and there were all kinds of places in the colonies were a person could end up quite persecuted for not 'believing correctly' ... even though a large majority of the colonists came here to escape religious persecution ... many felt that religious persecution was perfectly fine (as long as it was their own religion that was doing the persecuting). Look up the Flushing Remonstrance on Wikipedia:


    A quote from George Washington from 1790:
    "All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it were by the indulgence of one class of people, that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives ..."


    """"""

    ""





    Yes, it's a fact that the majority, by far, of the founding fathers were deists ... Patrick Henry was the only evangelist on the crew ...
    Deists believe there is a single god ... and that's about it.

    Because of people like Georgie though our children believe that rot which undermines one of the key reasons our nation was founded with the rules it was founded on i.e., "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . ."

    People had been living 'over here' for about a hundred years leading up to 1776 and there were all kinds of places in the colonies were a person could end up quite persecuted for not 'believing correctly' ... even though a large majority of the colonists came here to escape religious persecution ... many felt that religious persecution was perfectly fine (as long as it was their own religion that was doing the persecuting). Look up the Flushing Remonstrance on Wikipedia:
    felt religious persecution perfectly fine religion persecuting flushing remonstrance wikipedia

    A quote from George Washington from 1790:
    "All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it were by the indulgence of one class of people, that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens, in giving it on all occasions their effectual support."

    A quote from Thomas Jefferson from 1802:
    "Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his god, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their "legislature" should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between church and State. Adhering to this expression of the supreme will of the nation in behalf of the rights of conscience, I shall see with sincere satisfaction the progress of those sentiments which tend to restore to man all his natural rights, convinced he has no natural right in opposition to his social duties."

    In 1773, the Rev. Isaac Backus , the most prominent Baptist minister in New England, observed that when "church and state are separate, the effects are happy, and they do not at all interfere with each other: but where they have been confounded together, no tongue nor pen can fully describe the mischiefs that have ensued."

    Want more?
    Stop by here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
    or here:
    http://www.theocracywatch.org...
    (more)
  • Georgie... X Weath... 2009/06/23 03:25:13 (edited)
    Georgie's Girl
    +1
    You are right about the government making no law respecting an establishment of religion..... They have never proclaimed that there is a religion of the government, such as England (the Church of England)

    Church of England
    The Church of England badge is copyright © The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org

    The Church of England logo since 1996
    Supreme Governor Queen Elizabeth II
    Primate Rowan Williams
    Headquarters Church House, Great Smith Street, London SW1P 3AZ
    Territory England, Isle of Man, Channel Islands, Continental Europe, Gibraltar
    Members 13.4 million[1]
    Website http://www.cofe.anglican.org...

    But of course, with our new POTUS, all things are possible... We may just become a Muslim nation!
  • Georgie... Elemenopee 2009/06/22 15:27:08
    Georgie's Girl
    +2
    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org
    Frieze behind the judges chairs on the wall in the supreme court courtroom.

    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org
    Moses on the Supreme court building.

    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org
    Another frieze in the courtroom of the supreme court.

    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org
    Ten commandments on the Supreme Court Outer doors and on Bronze surrounding doors.

    Free image hosting powered by PostImage.org
    The ten commandments carved in oak insided the supreme court.

    If you have any problem with any of these images, google Ten Commandments or Moses in the Supreme court/courtroom.
  • Georgie... Elemenopee 2009/06/22 15:49:27
    Georgie's Girl
    +2
    Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, supported the separation of church and state.

    The phrase "separation of church and state" is derived from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to a group identifying themselves as the Danbury Baptists. In that letter, referencing the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jefferson writes:

    Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.[15]

    Another early user of the term was James Madison, the principal drafter of the United States Bill of Rights, who often wrote of "total separation of the church from the state."[16] "Strongly guarded as is the separation between Religion & Govt in the Constitution of the United States," Madison wrote,[17] and he declared, "practical distinction between Religion and Civil Government is essential to the purity of both, and as g...""&"







    Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, supported the separation of church and state.

    The phrase "separation of church and state" is derived from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to a group identifying themselves as the Danbury Baptists. In that letter, referencing the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jefferson writes:

    Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.[15]

    Another early user of the term was James Madison, the principal drafter of the United States Bill of Rights, who often wrote of "total separation of the church from the state."[16] "Strongly guarded as is the separation between Religion & Govt in the Constitution of the United States," Madison wrote,[17] and he declared, "practical distinction between Religion and Civil Government is essential to the purity of both, and as guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States."[18] In a letter to Edward Livingston Madison further expanded, "We are teaching the world the great truth that Govts. do better without Kings & Nobles than with them. The merit will be doubled by the other lesson that Religion flourishes in greater purity, without than with the aid of Govt." [19] This attitude is further reflected in the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, originally authored by Thomas Jefferson, but championed by Madison, and guaranteeing that no one may be compelled to finance any religion or denomination.

    ... no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish enlarge, or affect their civil capacities. [20]

    Under the United States Constitution, the treatment of religion by the government is broken into two clauses: the establishment clause and the free exercise clause. While both are discussed in the context of the separation of church and state, it is more often discussed in regard to whether certain state actions would amount to an impermissible government establishment of religion.

    The phrase was also mentioned in an eloquent letter written by President John Tyler on July 10, 1843. [21]

    The United States Supreme Court has referenced the separation of church and state metaphor more than 25 times, first in 1878. In Reynolds, the Court denied the free exercise claims of Mormons in the Utah territory who claimed polygamy was an aspect of their religious freedom. The Court used the phrase again by Justice Hugo Black in 1947 in Everson. The term has been used and defended heavily by the Court, but is not unanimously held. In a minority opinion in Wallace v. Jaffree, Justice Rehnquist presented the view that the establishment clause was intended to protect local establishments of religion from federal interference. Justice Scalia has criticized the metaphor as a bulldozer removing religion from American public life.[22]
    (more)
  • RJ~PWCM... Georgie... 2009/06/23 01:01:39
    RJ~PWCM~JLA
    +1
    You're just confusing them with the facts!
  • X Weath... Georgie... 2009/06/23 03:57:08
    X Weatherman
    I already posted that which only goes to show you didn't even read it.
  • Georgie... X Weath... 2009/06/23 06:19:14
    Georgie's Girl
    I read all things connected to my postings. Which "that" was it that you are refering to???

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