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Should taxpayer money be used to fund the National Endowment for the Arts?

KoAm 2012/04/11 00:25:08
Related Topics: Art, Taxpayer, Money
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  • RJ~PWCM~JLA 2012/04/11 01:42:15
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    RJ~PWCM~JLA
    +7
    No self-respecting artist would take government money. Real artists want to be independent of government control. The NEA, especially under the lunatic Jim Leach, produces political "art".

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  • Samantha 2012/04/12 22:22:15
    Yes. It's important to fund things like that.
    Samantha
    Culture is important, and the government should fund the National Endowment for the Arts. If the U.S. can spend billions and billions for weapons, it can spend money to support the arts.
  • schjaz 2012/04/12 15:59:08
    Yes. It's important to fund things like that.
    schjaz
    The arts are important but like anything else, we need to watch our pocketbook.
  • TuringsChild 2012/04/12 05:54:14
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    TuringsChild
    Bureaucrats have no idea what art IS anyway.
    Urine and elephant dung are NOT artistic media!
  • elijahin24 2012/04/11 20:34:09
    Yes. It's important to fund things like that.
    elijahin24
    +1
    We need to recognize that not all tax dollars spent, are wasted. The NEA is an investment. The arts are incredibly important. Art fosters creativity. Creativity is THE key ingrediant to solving problems of every kind, including our economic ones. Throughout history, there has been a direct link between the arts, and the advancement of society. The Rennesance wasn't just about pretty pictures and sculptures, it was about science, discovery. The 60's weren't just about sex, drugs and Rock-n-Roll; it was about ending discrimination, medical advancement and going to the moon.
    How many of the great masters, of music, our poetry, or painting, died penniless, young, and alone; never to be appreciated until after they were long gone? Some of these have been within the last hundred years.
    The NEA is one thing we can do to prevent that from happening today. And if we claim to value the arts, it's important that we put our money where our mouths are.
  • ruthannhausman 2012/04/11 19:48:06
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    ruthannhausman
    +1
    Taxpayer money is stretched too far as it is. As much as we'd like to see lots and lots of organizations get funded, the taxpayers' dollars are not designed to support things like the arts. Celebrities can hold fundraisers for those types of activities.
  • schjaz ruthann... 2012/04/12 16:00:18
    schjaz
    I think we should give a little or it turns into a back scratching contest.
  • Samantha ruthann... 2012/04/12 22:22:52
    Samantha
    Then, cut money from the war budget.
  • ruthann... Samantha 2012/04/13 00:01:15
    ruthannhausman
    Oh, you think there aren't enough military families requiring food stamps? National security and the arts aren't even on the same plane, Samantha. But here's a neat thought: cut the billions of "foreign aid" we send out to our enemies every year. That's a good start. Stick to disaster relief work only.
  • Samantha ruthann... 2012/04/13 11:00:46
    Samantha
    Foreign aid comprises only a very small percentage of the federal budget. The U.S. spends more money on the war budget than most other countries combined. It's a huge waste of money.
  • Mimosa 2012/04/11 15:55:47
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    Mimosa
    there are far more important things to spend money on than art
  • Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F 2012/04/11 14:58:44
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    Aqua Surf BTO-t-BCRA-F
    +1
    NEA should be abolished. It supports leftist projects. There are so many more important things that need to be taken care of. Washington needs to get it's priorities straight on this.
  • Fred 2012/04/11 14:25:14
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    Fred
    Normally I would have said yes ... but some of the crap they have been supporting Id rather feed some kids
  • Sgt Major B 2012/04/11 12:02:55
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    Sgt Major B
    +3
    I love the arts. Classical music is my favorite. I can spend hours in a gallerey.

    They shouldn't receive one cent of federal funding. They need to stand on their own or fail, whether it's good times or bad.
  • goatman112003 2012/04/11 11:56:07
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    goatman112003
    +2
    This isn't the work of government but of endowments and others groups.
  • Marvelous Wildfire 2012/04/11 06:44:25
    No. The government is broke, there are more vital things to pay for, and fun...
    Marvelous Wildfire
    +2
    NO!
    If the art isn't good enough to support itself, it's not good enough to receive taxPAYER'S money.
  • A Founding Father 2012/04/11 06:07:29
    Yes. It's important to fund things like that.
    A Founding Father
    Supporting the arts is so much more important and vital than buying another aircraft carrier, fighting another war over a pool of oil, or allowing the "Top 2% Club" to buy more private jets and estates in the Bahamas. Once the arts are diminished and ignorance is allowed to overwhelm the contributions of creative minds, all society is diminished. Take notice that in Islamic countries there is no music, no live theater, no paintings, no books, no
    expressions of creativity or other arts. Neither were such permitted during the "Dark Ages", and that is why we remember that period of history as the most miserable and unproductive of all the history of mankind. If we lose the desire to support these expressions of the human spirit, we will be no better than the Islamic radicals and will sink
    further into the "dumbing down" of our civilization into third world status.
  • Sofahead A Found... 2012/04/11 15:59:14 (edited)
    Sofahead
    +1
    Not a fair comparsion. This not about outlawing the arts as Islam has done, it's about what is too often taxpayer Dollars wasted on the "arts". Crap like a cruxific hang in a jar of urine.
    Still when did the government get into the "culture" business of subsidizing what is way too often some rather esoteric nonsense? How does this program truly enrich the average person's life, as far as I can see it doesn't really. Compared to what the average person's interest are, it's uber-trivial.
  • A Found... Sofahead 2012/04/11 17:17:36 (edited)
    A Founding Father
    To be sure, the "average person" is more likely to sit in front of a television and watch 50 autos go round and round, while drinking a six-pack of something resembling real beer. But, ignorance and sloth have always been with humanity. It is one object of the "arts" to try to elevate the intellect of such "average persons" to a greater awareness of life's greater and more creative pleasures.

    To be sure, many idiots have taken advantage of the funds made available to "artists", and much of the funding, both private and public, has been tossed out there and not well managed. You cite just one example of that. But, such is no more reason to abandon the entire process than is the examples of waste in other places, such as the $1,800 commode seats and the $1,000 screwdrivers purchased by our Pentagon procurement "experts".

    Just recently there is a growing awareness of the "encore" performances and live broadcasts into theaters around the world of symphonies, operas, live theater, and
    personal performances, made available with funding and support of the National Endowment fro the Arts and some private donations. These are a tremendous outreach of the arts at a small cost to the public - an $8-10 ticket to a performance that sells in New York for $200-400 a seat. The "average pe...

    To be sure, the "average person" is more likely to sit in front of a television and watch 50 autos go round and round, while drinking a six-pack of something resembling real beer. But, ignorance and sloth have always been with humanity. It is one object of the "arts" to try to elevate the intellect of such "average persons" to a greater awareness of life's greater and more creative pleasures.

    To be sure, many idiots have taken advantage of the funds made available to "artists", and much of the funding, both private and public, has been tossed out there and not well managed. You cite just one example of that. But, such is no more reason to abandon the entire process than is the examples of waste in other places, such as the $1,800 commode seats and the $1,000 screwdrivers purchased by our Pentagon procurement "experts".

    Just recently there is a growing awareness of the "encore" performances and live broadcasts into theaters around the world of symphonies, operas, live theater, and
    personal performances, made available with funding and support of the National Endowment fro the Arts and some private donations. These are a tremendous outreach of the arts at a small cost to the public - an $8-10 ticket to a performance that sells in New York for $200-400 a seat. The "average person" would do well to gather the family and take advantage of these opportunities.

    Humanity can either rise above yesterday or not, even sink even deeper into the mundane and often obcene trash that is made available by those who would sell sludge from the gutter for a profit. We all have choices of what to do with our time and money. The small token of money allocated to the arts by the Government is a worthwhile investment, costing far less than millions of projects that are wasteful and harmful to humanity, such as subsidies to tobacco farmers and environmental polluters.
    (more)
  • Sofahead A Found... 2012/04/12 00:09:44
    Sofahead
    A comment on this "...the examples of waste in other places, such as the $1,800 commode seats and the $1,000 screwdrivers purchased by our Pentagon procurement "experts"."

    This situation occurs because the government agencies put such strict tolerances on the things they contract that the quality control rejection rate pushes the cost of many things up to obscene levels so the contractors and engineers have no other ways to defray the expense. i.e. if 300 screwdrivers that are made for a very specialized use and the government inspectors accept only 17, the manufacturer can't afford to eat the cost of the rejected 283, who do think is going to absorb the the cost?
    The place my father worked had to deal with this sort of crap. They made a valve for the Navy using the plans they supplied, the Navy inspectors passed it but when if prove not to be up to the demands of their expected use, my father's company still had to absorb the cost of the Navy's design failure.
  • A Found... Sofahead 2012/04/12 00:26:41
    A Founding Father
    Both the commode seats and the screwdrivers incidents I cited were real events. Both of these items were "off the shelf" products available at Sears or True Value Hardware for normal retail prices, and some unconscionable corporation took advantage of an opportunity to pillage the taxpayers. I mentioned them as examples of wastes that could easily pay for the token amounts we spend on the arts. There is no hole in the taxpayer's pockets so large as the procurement system of the Pentagon. You are correct to describe the absurd "Specifications" for mundane things that invite waste and fraud at every level.
  • KoAm A Found... 2012/04/11 16:03:03
    KoAm
    +1
    >>>Take notice that in Islamic countries there is no music, no live theater, no paintings, no books, no
    expressions of creativity or other arts. >>>

    Defunding the NEA would not be the equivalent of that, so ... no offense, but I really don't know why you're bringing that up here.

    Defunding the NEA wouldn't be an act of "banning art" or anything. Art could still be freely produced, but just not on the taxpayers' dimes.

    It's a nonessential expense, and in these days of severe budgetary mess, such expenses need to be eliminated.
  • A Found... KoAm 2012/04/11 17:33:32 (edited)
    A Founding Father
    It was such "logic" that brought about the "Dark Ages", when the "Church" decided that creative minds should be defeated and not employed, as their money was needed to send "Crusaders" across the world to pillage and plunder the "non-believers" and helpless "infidels" who needed to be killed. A single new aircraft to be purchased by the Pentagon will cost more than five times the total Federal allocation to the EDA. By the same "logic" employed by the "Church", we could claim to need money to kill some "non-believers" and "infidels", in case we can find some in places these planes might reach.

    We can do well to purchase only 239, not 240, of these aircraft, if that would be the trade-off for something so important as preserving and encouraging our culture and the creativity of human endeavor. We have choices as to what our value system is,
    evidenced by how we allocate our Federal revenues. As for me, I would vastly expand the EDA budgets and not subsidize the tobacco industry that kills more than 400,000 of our citizens every year, and I would purchase only 100 of the new and useless airplanes. But, those are just my values, and everyone has an opinion.
  • KoAm A Found... 2012/04/12 01:16:49
    KoAm
    Oh jeez ... now we're going back a thousand years to the Dark Ages?

    Okay, sorry. I can't keep up with this!
  • A Found... KoAm 2012/04/12 01:29:24
    A Founding Father
    Perhaps your reservations originated there? If you don't reflect on the history of human existance, you have no persepective from which to make a judgement about
    the results of what might appear to be an original idea. Every day would appear to be a new beginning, which isn't the case.
  • Samantha KoAm 2012/04/12 22:24:00
    Samantha
    There are other things we can cut such as money for military bands.
  • Kevin 2012/04/11 05:14:25
  • wicked ... Kevin 2012/04/11 20:05:26
    wicked soda boy
    People will still create art, and people will continue supporting artists whether taxpayers are being screwed in the process or not.
  • Kevin wicked ... 2012/04/11 20:59:59
  • wicked ... Kevin 2012/04/11 21:07:21
    wicked soda boy
    I read your whole comment and disagree with the notion that a government needs to use tax dollars in order to "support their culture". That's what the question was all about, whether tax dollars should be used, not whether government should be supportive.
  • Kevin wicked ... 2012/04/11 21:37:09
  • wicked ... Kevin 2012/04/11 21:51:01
    wicked soda boy
    Do you have any idea how lame that argument is?
    You are free to support what you want, but don't spend money taxed away from my hard earned pay on YOUR idea of what constitutes art!
  • Kevin wicked ... 2012/04/11 23:17:00
  • iamthemob ~ the 444th Guru ~ 2012/04/11 04:38:05 (edited)
    Not sure.
    iamthemob ~ the 444th Guru ~
    +1
    I'm on the fence on this. Art is perhaps one of the most significant ways a culture or nation captures and preserves it's identity for future generations.



    But the funding of the arts is something that the private sector is always readily funds. And the NEA doesn't provide a necessary service for survival...art will always be produced, regardless of whether there's a lot of money in it. However, there are other expenditures by the federal government that actually deal with the protection or defense of life and liberties, etc., and if we're looking to make cuts, we have to look at programs like the NEA.



    And if we think that the government should be funding the arts in part at least, then the federal government might not be the best one to do it (should we just leave it to the states...or municipalities?).



    Perhaps we should do something like provide for things like the NEA in conditional budget items...if the government ends up having excess money in it's budget, then that pours over into things like the NEA.



    Sure...many will say that this is essentially the same as defunding as we're never going to see a government come under budget...but hey, it's a though. ;-)
  • wicked ... iamthem... 2012/04/11 20:07:22
    wicked soda boy
    The problem is that one political party uses the NEA as a slush fund for people who help their campaigns. Why should my tax dollars be used to support a political party that I disagree with?
  • iamthem... wicked ... 2012/04/11 21:14:33
    iamthemob ~ the 444th Guru ~
    That's not the problem at all, and accusations such as this could be made about any agency/government action/etc.

    I don't know why you're making this claim, or what your support for it is...but in the end, there are always going to be things that are done with your tax dollars that you disagree with. That's a side effect of living in a diverse nation.
  • wicked ... iamthem... 2012/04/11 21:23:47
    wicked soda boy
    Ever heard of constitutional limits to what our federal govt is and IS NOT allowed to do? All powers not specifically enumerated to the federal govt were to be left to states. Of course, they've been ignoring the 10th Amendment for decades now, I realize that. Still, it pays to be informed...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
  • iamthem... wicked ... 2012/04/11 21:30:04
    iamthemob ~ the 444th Guru ~
    That's not responsive. I'm asking why it is you're making the claim that it's a political slush fund.
  • wicked ... iamthem... 2012/04/11 21:52:32
    wicked soda boy
    You can do your own research. If you do, you'll figure it out.
  • iamthem... wicked ... 2012/04/12 17:21:57
    iamthemob ~ the 444th Guru ~
    No. You made the claim. You support it.

    If you do not, then I have no reason to trust you, and your statements have no merit.
  • wicked ... iamthem... 2012/04/13 04:08:22
    wicked soda boy
    You want to have the last word. How sad for you. The points I made are easily confirmed. The slush fund policies of the democrat party supporting the NEA and the $$$$$$$$$ give-back is so well accaepted as fact and so well documented, i have NO IDEA WHY WE'RE even discussing the facts.

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