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Should College Be a Constitutional Right?

AdriHead 2012/07/11 22:38:43
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We all know student loans can be killer. And though Congress recently announced a tentative deal that would prevent student loan rates from doubling, according to a recent poll, that's still not enough for the average American.

A national poll done by the Carnegie Corporation of New York found that most Americans (76 percent) believe that access to higher education should be a constitutional right. Additionally, 67 percent believe that the cost of college is the biggest barrier to that access. It's a controversial issue, but it has to be asked: Do you think easier access to college should be a constitutional right for all Americans?

GOOD.IS reports:
A deeply divided Congress gives us little hope, but 150 years ago an equally partisan climate produced some of the nation's top public universities.
college

Read More: http://www.good.is/post/most-americans-believe-col...

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  • mjays 2012/07/19 18:48:33
    No
    mjays
    People are just insane anymore! This is not a "right"! Nothing that somebody else has to pay for should ever be a "right"! What about their right NOT to pay for your every desire??
  • mjays mjays 2012/07/19 18:49:13
    mjays
    In any case, why don't we focus on protecting the constitutional rights that are already being violating, instead of creating new ones??
  • Studied 2012/07/17 01:28:49
    No
    Studied
    +1
    If the government quits giving out student loans so easily, it would force the cost down. What has happened to this country? Where is the incentive to be responsible for your own choices? I worked my way through college. Took a little longer, but sure do probably appreciate it more. Everyone with adequate grades already has the choice to go to college, but taxpayers should not be forced to carry the burden of someone elses decision.
  • Commander Pyle 2012/07/16 04:19:55
    No
    Commander Pyle
    Outrageous.
  • Stoner 2012/07/15 21:26:27 (edited)
    No
    Stoner
    Americas want another thing given to them ..come on give me a break..when can i stop paying for someone else s choices.
  • Call me Mark willya? 2012/07/14 18:03:14
    Yes
    Call me Mark willya?
    +1
    I firmly believe that ALL education should be free so that we can reach higher levels of enlightenment and intelligence. The better educated someone is the more likely they are to raise intelligent children and the less likely they are to have to rely on criminal activity to make a life for themselves. It would also ensure that, while the rich would still get richer, the poor wouldn't necessarily stay poor. I believe that when someone reaches the limit of their ability to learn they will get poor marks and fail out, but anyone that has the will and mind to succeed would be able to go on and do great things.
  • dekecds Call me... 2012/07/17 02:30:26
    dekecds
    +1
    Care to quit your job and teach it for free? That would be a big step toward your plan!
  • Call me... dekecds 2012/07/24 12:04:03
    Call me Mark willya?
    I'd be more than willing to teach for a subsistence wage if not free, but what I'm seeing is the revenue our country would be getting from the thousands of new Ideas and businesses that would be started by the graduates. It wouldn't happen the year the programs started, maybe not for around 5 to 8 years, but I do think it would happen. I would also be in favor of monitoring a person's major and grades to make sure they were serious about it and not just going to school to avoid getting a job.
  • dekecds Call me... 2012/07/24 14:30:38
    dekecds
    Hey, more power to you, though I'll say that most teachers here in Texas are getting subsistence pay already. Any lower and they wouldn't be able to afford rent. I do agree that more jobs and workers would spring up from the graduates, but at the same time I have to ask: Wouldn't all of that make it harder to compete for the high level jobs? I don't mean just a little, I mean a LOT harder! Here is the scenario: for the first 2-3 years there would be no real problems, but after that, the competitive companies no longer hire college grads. They then start hiring college grads with extra certificates, then later they start hiring only masters and phd's, and it goes on and on! It's already ridiculous that you must go to 4-6 years of college to essentially learn nothing just to prove to an employer that your serious. Your free college plan would raise the "I made it on my own bar" so high that only the rich progeny would ever get a good job.
  • Call me... dekecds 2012/08/23 01:12:55
    Call me Mark willya?
    It's already hard to compete for jobs, and in fact damn near impossible if you have no college background unless you like doing grunt work at a fast food place. The more education this country supplies it's youth the more intelligent and therefore more productive they will be and the more secure the US dollar will become and the better off the country will be. Here's a thought, I do personally agree that Teachers and Nurses are the two most underpaid professions considering the importance of their jobs. I say we take half the "profit" money from oil companies and professional sports and anyone else whose business nets them a six figure or better income, and funnel it directly into schools (including colleges) and hospitals, and see if some things don't run a little more smoothly.
  • dekecds Call me... 2012/08/23 11:34:30
    dekecds
    I agree with what you are saying here for the most part, but I think the disparity between the nurse and the teacher are a bit high where I live. The basis for that comes from my mother (a teacher) and my aunt (a registered nurse). Yes there are some beggining level nurses that make sub 50K but my aunt makes 110K after only 11 years as a nurse while my Mom makes 38K as a teacher of 23 years.
    By your standards, a nurse where I live would suffer an additional tax.
  • sundance 2012/07/13 21:33:34
    No
    sundance
    No, I don't think it is a constitutional right, nor should it be. It should, however, be mandatory....Just a thought...
  • Call me... sundance 2012/07/24 12:05:05
    Call me Mark willya?
    Mandatory? So basically jail anyone that can't afford to go to college?
  • sundance Call me... 2012/07/25 04:02:36 (edited)
    sundance
    Do you go to jail for not going to high school? Of course not. You also don't get any father than burger king, now do you?... We live in the technologically advanced twenty first century, and we need to be educated like we are. We need to have a citizenry that can function within these technologies, and continue to improve upon them. So, the level of education had better rise with the demands, or the demands will go unheard. Simple logic....Just a thought....

    PS...Jail? where did you get jail from?. Have a big bowl of paranoia puffs for breakfast did we?...
  • tuskbaby 2012/07/13 20:47:56
    Yes
    tuskbaby
    As in, subsidies for tuition. Why not spend more money on American Education, and more opportunities to educate Americans than spending money on bogus policing across seas?
  • sundance tuskbaby 2012/07/13 21:42:11
    sundance
    We should spend more on education. A whole lot more. We should also reward area specific educations with looser purse strings. Should you desire an MIT level education in Physics, then we should be happy to foot the bill. Now, if your going to spend four years in college to study the mating habits of the Great Grey Grebe, then your education, and its level of importance, should be funded as such. As far as foreign policy is concerned, we should handle the situation in exactly the same manner. Fund "everything" by its level of applicable importance...Just a thought...
  • tuskbaby sundance 2012/07/17 02:59:14
    tuskbaby
    So pay more for higher demand degrees? I can see that. Good thought
  • sundance tuskbaby 2012/07/17 05:11:59
    sundance
    Why not? I think we have enough associate level sociology degree holders, flippin burgers at McDonald's, don't you? Something tells me that a graduate from MIT, is going to contribute one hell of a lot more to society, than some obscure "bachelors of culinary arts", from Mule shoe University. I would further that, this kind of thinking would stop producing the obligatory "Paper mill U". All of these fly by night, BS "universities", that promise the world. You know the ones. They give you some hoaky degree, that might or might not, even amount to transferable credits, let alone employment.
    I always love the ITT Tech commercials, that go on and on about how you will learn "cutting edge" technology, and job skills for the future. I know several of their "cutting edge" students. They said to hell with it, and enrolled in their local trade school, simply because the curriculum was very comparable, and tuition was a third the price ( and yes, I am being generous). And I do have to ask. ITT or MIT? You do the math (if you perform at an MIT level).
    My most fundamental worry about education is this. How many potential Einstein, Hawking and Edison's, go unnoticed, simply because they could not afford the tuition?...Just a thought...
  • dekecds 2012/07/13 20:34:21
    No
    dekecds
    +1
    I want to say that I am unclear about what the question is, but I think I know what it really is getting at. The question is "Should College Be a Constitutional Right?", but the article addresses "access" to higher education, as if to disguise the meaning. So I'll answer both questions.
    1.) Access to college education should be a constitutional right. You should be free to do anything that is not deemed a violation of the law, and no law should ever prevent you from partaking in an event that harms no one.

    2.) Payment for college, however, should not be government provided. This is not a constitutional right.

    -It is a constitutional right to be provided an opportunity to work for money or goods exchanged, but not to receive a paycheck without cause.

    -It is a constitutional right to have access to health care that is affordable, but not to have it paid for without reason or be forced to buy it.
  • sobersouljah 2012/07/13 20:07:19
    No
    sobersouljah
    +1
    The only way to pull it off is to steal from other people.
  • dePSyChO 2012/07/13 17:55:17
    Yes
    dePSyChO
    +2
    It should be free, too. College is important. Taxes should pay for that instead of useless wars for "terrorism" (cough*oil*cough).
  • ComeOnNow dePSyChO 2012/07/13 18:12:24
    ComeOnNow
    +2
    Really, trying to use one horrible spending to try to justify another. That is a stupid argument. They could always avoid the debt by working their way through college, living at home, starting at a community college, an then transferring to a state college. They choose the debt. How the hell is that anyone else's fault? Why should others have to pay for their choice? The main reason college has become so expensive is because all people have to do is sign on the line for student loans. Universities have become resorts work elaborate buildings, gymnasiums that are like water parks or spas, and on and on. Nobody is entitled to anything. They can earn it like anyone else. Look what the federal government has done to our K-12 education. It is pathetic. People graduate that can't even read.
  • dePSyChO ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:20:11
    dePSyChO
    >They could always avoid the debt by working their way through college, living at home, starting at a community college, an then transferring to a state college.
    I did all of this and still ended up with debt. Unless you have a lot of money or got some good scholarships, you *will* rack up debt by going to college.

    >They choose the debt. How the hell is that anyone else's fault?
    Any good paying job (or hell, any job in general nowadays) almost requires college.

    >Why should others have to pay for their choice?
    Because we should all care for one another, and because it's a better thing to spend money on than half of what we're spending it on now.

    >The main reason college has become so expensive is because all people have to do is sign on the line for student loans.
    ...Because college is super expensive. It's a vicious cycle.

    >Universities have become resorts work elaborate buildings, gymnasiums that are like water parks or spas, and on and on.
    That doesn't even make sense. So a school having an on campus gym is a terrible thing now?

    >Nobody is entitled to anything. They can earn it like anyone else.
    You aren't "entitled" for wanting to go to college and earn a better place in life.

    >Look what the federal government has done to our K-12 education. It is pathetic. People graduate that can't even read.
    Our schools do suck, but that isn't relevant. College is different.
  • ComeOnNow dePSyChO 2012/07/13 18:37:45
    ComeOnNow
    +1
    Oh, give me a break.

    ISU students are among the most indebted in the nation upon graduation.

    Supporters of the proposed $52.8 million recreation plan — billed as an "extreme makeover" on ISU's Web site — say they compete for students with universities in Iowa and across the country that boast higher rock-climbing walls, more expansive weight room space, and more numerous exercise rooms.

    College costs have increased while universities compete to build state-of-the-art facilities that could entice students to choose their schools.

    ISU officials said they have fallen behind in the race.

    The University of Iowa just started construction on a $70 million athletic building that will also feature an indoor leisure pool with a slide, a hot tub and a rock-climbing area in the water.

    The University of Northern Iowa's 10-year-old, $18 million Wellness and Recreation Center also boasts a leisure pool with a 138-foot water slide and a "bubble couch," an elevated place in the pool where water shoots out.

    In the Midwest, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is contemplating up to $87.2 million in campus recreation projects, which could include an ice-skating arena and various renovations and expansions. It could also encompass the creation of space for a 66-foot climbing wall and an "inhalation room,"...






    Oh, give me a break.

    ISU students are among the most indebted in the nation upon graduation.

    Supporters of the proposed $52.8 million recreation plan — billed as an "extreme makeover" on ISU's Web site — say they compete for students with universities in Iowa and across the country that boast higher rock-climbing walls, more expansive weight room space, and more numerous exercise rooms.

    College costs have increased while universities compete to build state-of-the-art facilities that could entice students to choose their schools.

    ISU officials said they have fallen behind in the race.

    The University of Iowa just started construction on a $70 million athletic building that will also feature an indoor leisure pool with a slide, a hot tub and a rock-climbing area in the water.

    The University of Northern Iowa's 10-year-old, $18 million Wellness and Recreation Center also boasts a leisure pool with a 138-foot water slide and a "bubble couch," an elevated place in the pool where water shoots out.

    In the Midwest, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is contemplating up to $87.2 million in campus recreation projects, which could include an ice-skating arena and various renovations and expansions. It could also encompass the creation of space for a 66-foot climbing wall and an "inhalation room," where students could spend time amid eucalyptus vapors, which help clear up the sinuses, said Stan Campbell, director of campus recreation.

    The University of Missouri-Columbia also just finished a $49.2 million recreation complex, paid for with student fees increased $74 per semester. The Mizzou Student Recreation Complex has four group exercise studios, a 20,000-square-foot fitness center and a leisure pool called the Tiger Grotto with a hot tub and waterfall area.

    Nearly 200 campuses nationally said in a 2006 survey by the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association that they planned recreation construction in the next five years, estimated to cost $3.1 billion.


    This is not a gym. It is another example of the wasst too easy of access to money at Universities is, and shows that if the federal government gets involved, it will egt worse.
    (more)
  • dePSyChO ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:48:12
    dePSyChO
    Some of this stuff is crazy, but a little innovation isn't bad. Many schools have swimming teams, so pools are justified. Sports in general are a large part of college and many of these (besides stuff like a rock climbing wall) can be justified with various sports.

    And yes, it's wasteful spending in some cases. It shouldn't, however, come down on the students (like increased rates).
  • ComeOnNow dePSyChO 2012/07/13 18:59:36
    ComeOnNow
    This is not innovation, it is nicer than almossy any luxury resort.. They have a sseperate olympic size pool for the swim team.
  • dePSyChO ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 19:10:04 (edited)
    dePSyChO
    It's innovation.
  • Studied dePSyChO 2012/07/17 01:33:51
    Studied
    +1
    It is theft from the taxpayers.
  • dePSyChO Studied 2012/07/23 22:07:05
    dePSyChO
    So is war.
  • ComeOnNow ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:56:37
  • ComeOnNow ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:57:45
  • ComeOnNow ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:58:16
  • ComeOnNow ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:57:14
  • ««Ginge... ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:21:01
    ««Gingey, the Master Debater of Þ|-|Дэ†»»
    +1
    "They could always avoid the debt by working their way through college, living at home, starting at a community college, an then transferring to a state college."

    Yeah, I did all of that, and I'm still $40,000 in the hole. Welcome to America.
  • ComeOnNow ««Ginge... 2012/07/13 18:38:11
    ComeOnNow
    That is your fault.
  • ««Ginge... ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 18:42:09
    ««Gingey, the Master Debater of Þ|-|Дэ†»»
    +1
    Yeah man, it's totally my fault for being born into a middle class family.

    eye roll gif
  • dePSyChO ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 19:09:50
    dePSyChO
    I'm sorry we can't all be rich like you seem to be.
  • ComeOnNow dePSyChO 2012/07/13 19:20:01
    ComeOnNow
    +1
    What the hell are you talking about you freak. I am saying this is a waste of money, and rich ass you are trying to justify it. Have you lst your mind or just a pathetic democrat dolt that can't defend your failed ideology so you resort to that argument whenever challenged?
  • sbtbill ComeOnNow 2012/07/13 21:07:20
    sbtbill
    Why is it a waste of money?
  • ComeOnNow sbtbill 2012/07/13 21:39:55
    ComeOnNow
    1. What do they have to do with education?

    2. Schools know that these things will significantly drive up costs but that students will irresponsibly sign that line on their student loans to go to 'cooler' schools and rack up massive debt. it is a clear symptom of the problem. Schools have absolutely o incentive to keep tuition costs low between state and federal subsidies and essay access to massive student loans. Why should we have to pay to send kids to resorts that provide housing, food, resort like amenities, and then the tuition is about half the total cost they are racking up.
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