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Romney Booed at NAACP. Should Romney be Booed Everywhere?

joseph digristina 2012/07/11 22:11:13
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3:25 p.m. ET

(CBS News) Addressing a
predominantly black audience for just the second time on the campaign
trail, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney on
Wednesday took his message to the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), delivering a speech that was
received with mixed response -- including multiple instances of
prolonged boos.

The candidate, whose remarks signaled a
commitment to making inroads to black voters, stressed in his speech
that he's not "presuming" anyone's support. Particularly emphasizing his
commitment to improving America's education system, the former
Massachusetts governor outlined a five-point plan for growing the
economy and creating jobs.

As he usually does in such speeches,
Romney underscored his commitment to repealing Mr. Obama's health care
plan as part of his strategy to turn the economy around.

To
create jobs, he said, "I am going to eliminate every non-essential
expensive program I can find. That includes Obamacare." His comments
were met with extended boos from the audience.

In courting black support, Romney faces familiar barriers

He
was also booed when he told the largely black audience that "if you
want a president who will make things better in the African-American
community, you are looking at him."

Despite some resistance among
the crowd, Romney emphasized to the audience his belief that "if you
understood who I truly am in my heart, and if it were possible to fully
communicate what I believe is in the real, enduring best interest of
African-American families, you would vote for me for president."

He also invoked mention of his father, the former governor of Michigan, for his involvement in the civil rights movement.

"It
wasn't just that my dad helped write the civil rights provision for the
Mass - excuse me - Michigan Constitution, though he did," Romney said.
"It wasn't just that he helped create Michigan's first civil rights
commission, or that as governor he marched for civil rights in Detroit -
though he did those things, too. More than these public acts, it was
the kind of man he was, and the way he dealt with every person, black or
white. He was a man of the fairest instincts, and a man of faith who
knew that every person was a child of God."

Despite the largely
positive tone of his speech, Romney did take a dig at Mr. Obama, who
declined to attend the conference this year, sending Vice President Joe
Biden in his place.

"I can't promise that you and I will agree on
every issue. But I do promise that your hospitality to me today will be
returned," he said. "And if I am elected president, and you invite me
to next year's convention, I would count it as a privilege, and my
answer will be yes."

Mr. Obama's campaign did not immediately
respond to a query about his decision to skip this year's convention,
but he will speak at the National Urban League's 2012 conference on July
25.

Robert Bess, a Democrat from Alabama who attended the
speech, told CBS News he found little in Romney's speech that was
relevant to his life.

"I thought he was very careful - and as he
should be - with his words. I thought that it didn't really cover
anything that, to me, was relevant," said Bess, who plans to vote for
Mr. Obama. "I thought it was a typical political speech that said,
'Well, I gotta go here because I gotta do the right thing, but I'm going
to be safe."

Precious Byrd, another attendee at the convention,
said Romney had "some points" but that she still planned to vote for Mr.
Obama.

"I think it's pretty bold for him to come here to do a
presentation," she told CBS News. "But, you know, he tried. He doesn''t
have my vote. I don't really believe in some of the things that he
says. And there''s too many things out there that I think are really too
questionable to invest in his being our next President.""

In the
lead-up to Romney's speech, J.C. Watts, a former Republican congressman
and currently the chairman of the consulting firm J.C. Watts Companies,
expressed similar skepticism as to the significance of Romney's remarks.

"With all due respect to Governor Romney, he's probably doing it to check the box," Watts told CBS News on Tuesday.
"Having a Republican candidate speak at the NAACP convention is like
trying to build a house starting at the roof. If you don't have a
foundation, the roof isn't going to stand."

Michael Steele, who
served as the RNC's first black chairman from 2009 to early 2011,
expressed a deep frustration with the party for failing, in his eyes, to
adequately invest in building up African-American constituencies in the
last couple of years. Instead of pounding the pavement in new
communities and putting forth black candidates, he argues, "they've
thrown up a website and put some black faces on it."

"It's always
five months before the presidential election that they're concerned
with getting the black vote -- but what about the three years in
between?" he wondered, in a Tuesday interview with CBS News.
"If the party is serious about not becoming irrelevant by 2016, then
get off your ass and engage the people. Address the problems and
concerns in an unfiltered way. Have an honest moment in which you
recognize where you're falling short, and put on the table your
willingness to grow."

Following Romney's remarks Wednesday
morning, the NAACP released a statement saying it was "glad" the GOP
candidate addressed the convention -- but criticizing the content of his
comments.

"While we are glad that Governor Romney recognized
the power of the black electorate, he laid out an agenda that was
antithetical to many of our interests," said NAACP President Benjamin
Todd Jealous in a statement.

In an interview to appear
tonight at 8 PM ET on FOX Business Network's (FBN) Cavuto, Romney told
anchor Neil Cavuto that he "expected" the crowd at the convention to
respond negatively to his comments about repealing health care, but
insisted that "While we disagree on some issues like Obamacare, a lot of
issues we see eye to eye."

He maintained that he aims to "chip away" at Mr. Obama's lead among black voters.

"The
president has not been able to get the job done," he said. "People want
to see someone who can get this economy going. I expect to get African
American votes."

Add a comment above

Top Opinion

  • darcie lamar 2012/07/11 23:27:06 (edited)
    Yes, without a doubt.
    darcie lamar
    +6
    Americans should remain brainwashed and never listen to Mitt Romney and his solutions for a better life for us. Blacks should remain in the ghetto, lousy public schools, crowding our prisons. We all need to have Obamacare shoved down our throats. While you libs are at it, take away our guns and keep telling us what we can eat, where we can live, what car to drive as you spend tax dollars advertising for people to go on food stamps and disability. After all this is America.

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Opinions

  • mac9 2012/10/17 19:01:08
    None of the above
    mac9
    Liberals are the real racists.
  • BritPunk 2012/08/02 22:10:29
    None of the above
    BritPunk
    +1
    Actually he was cheered. You just have to juggle the soundtrack a bit !
  • Bill 2012/07/14 15:23:44 (edited)
    None of the above
    Bill
    He didn't have to PROVE anything, just speak.

    http://washingtonexaminer.com...
    Romney booed, called 'insulting' by NAACP

    Another board member, Amos Brown, of San Francisco, called Romney's address, "an insult to the NAACP," including his references to the importance of family.
    "For him to come here and lecture us about the family -- he doesn't need to be talking to Negros about that," Brown said. "Who tore up the family?"

    Well, Amos, it wasn't the Republicans. It was welfare dependency policies enacted by the Democrats. Besides, Obama has also generated those "insults" at the Black family.

    Obama said:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    Is that NOT insulting? And he went on to say even more critical things. Read it.

    Hey, Amos. Why don't you go and talk to this guy in the video and ask him what he is doing for the Black family. (AND the women.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    And this one...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...
    He didn't have to PROVE anything, just speak.

    http://washingtonexaminer.com...
    Romney booed, called 'insulting' by NAACP

    Another board member, Amos Brown, of San Francisco, called Romney's address, "an insult to the NAACP," including his references to the importance of family.
    "For him to come here and lecture us about the family -- he doesn't need to be talking to Negros about that," Brown said. "Who tore up the family?"

    Well, Amos, it wasn't the Republicans. It was welfare dependency policies enacted by the Democrats. Besides, Obama has also generated those "insults" at the Black family.

    Obama said:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    Is that NOT insulting? And he went on to say even more critical things. Read it.

    Hey, Amos. Why don't you go and talk to this guy in the video and ask him what he is doing for the Black family. (AND the women.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    And this one...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...
    (more)
  • Wilde~MoonChild ™ 2012/07/12 21:12:05
    Yes, without a doubt.
    Wilde~MoonChild ™
    +2
    boo and hiss!
  • LindaM 2012/07/12 20:53:03
    Yes, without a doubt.
    LindaM
    +3
    Besides being boring, he's foggy about all the issures. I can't tell if he's coming or going. Why isn't he direct and forceful? He seems very blah about anything he's talking about.
    No wonder he's booed. He's coming off the wall. He says things that people don't want to hear. They want action and if memory serves me right, his action in his own state wasn't all that swift..
  • joseph ... LindaM 2012/07/13 06:57:51
  • LindaM joseph ... 2012/07/13 07:20:00
    LindaM
    +2
    LOL Good one Joseph...
  • joseph ... LindaM 2012/07/13 07:36:57
  • LindaM joseph ... 2012/07/13 07:39:32
    LindaM
    +2
    I'll say. I copied it.
  • Bill LindaM 2012/07/14 15:40:51
    Bill
    You're right. He did say things that they didn't want to hear. Read what Amos Brown had to say...

    http://washingtonexaminer.com...
    Romney booed, called 'insulting' by NAACP

    Another board member, Amos Brown, of San Francisco, called Romney's address, "an insult to the NAACP," including his references to the importance of family.
    "For him to come here and lecture us about the family -- he doesn't need to be talking to Negros about that," Brown said. "Who tore up the family?"

    Well, Amos, it wasn't the Republicans. It was welfare dependency policies enacted by the Democrats. Besides, Obama has also generated those "insults" at the Black family.

    Obama said:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    Is that NOT insulting? And he went on to say even more critical things. Read it.

    Hey, Amos. Why don't you go and talk to this guy in the video and ask him what he is doing for the Black family. (AND the women.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    And this one...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...
    You're right. He did say things that they didn't want to hear. Read what Amos Brown had to say...

    http://washingtonexaminer.com...
    Romney booed, called 'insulting' by NAACP

    Another board member, Amos Brown, of San Francisco, called Romney's address, "an insult to the NAACP," including his references to the importance of family.
    "For him to come here and lecture us about the family -- he doesn't need to be talking to Negros about that," Brown said. "Who tore up the family?"

    Well, Amos, it wasn't the Republicans. It was welfare dependency policies enacted by the Democrats. Besides, Obama has also generated those "insults" at the Black family.

    Obama said:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    Is that NOT insulting? And he went on to say even more critical things. Read it.

    Hey, Amos. Why don't you go and talk to this guy in the video and ask him what he is doing for the Black family. (AND the women.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...

    And this one...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?...
    (more)
  • Billyk75 2012/07/12 16:16:34
    None of the above
    Billyk75
    Only where he isn't liked I guess.
  • joseph ... Billyk75 2012/07/13 06:55:42
  • Billyk75 joseph ... 2012/07/13 16:24:30
    Billyk75
    A very lame reply.
  • joseph ... Billyk75 2012/07/13 18:13:23
  • Billyk75 joseph ... 2012/07/13 19:18:35
    Billyk75
    No.
  • joseph ... Billyk75 2012/07/13 19:48:12
  • Billyk75 joseph ... 2012/07/14 18:49:18
    Billyk75
    I eagerly await your witless replies.
  • joseph ... Billyk75 2012/07/16 07:42:02
  • Billyk75 joseph ... 2012/07/16 17:32:09
    Billyk75
    I know you're pathetic. As well as ignorant and clueless.
  • joseph ... Billyk75 2012/07/17 06:44:40
  • 16 2012/07/12 13:45:43
    None of the above
    16
    I died when they started playing the organ. LOL!!!!
  • Skeptikat 2012/07/12 05:46:24
  • FindingHeartInThisCrazy World 2012/07/12 01:53:10
    Yes, most times.
    FindingHeartInThisCrazy World
  • DoxieDad 2012/07/12 01:40:03
    All of the above
    DoxieDad
    +1
    I choose all of the above as long as it is acceptable for a crowd to also Boo the President when he says something he knows is going to antagonize a crowd.
    Romney had to know what the reaction of the NAACP delegates would be when he said he would repeal Obama Care. That was done to do no more then antagonize a group that will most likely not vote for him anyway.
  • Skeptikat DoxieDad 2012/07/12 05:48:16
  • joseph ... Skeptikat 2012/07/12 07:16:53
  • Skeptikat joseph ... 2012/07/12 07:23:14
  • joseph ... Skeptikat 2012/07/13 06:59:12
  • DoxieDad Skeptikat 2012/07/12 13:05:45
    DoxieDad
    +2
    Good question!
  • Skeptikat DoxieDad 2012/07/12 15:18:50
  • Skeptikat DoxieDad 2012/07/12 15:26:00
  • DoxieDad Skeptikat 2012/07/13 03:07:32
    DoxieDad
    +3
    I know, that is why I have three of them :o)
    the alameda kids
  • Skeptikat DoxieDad 2012/07/13 03:15:02
  • DoxieDad Skeptikat 2012/07/13 03:24:16
    DoxieDad
    +2
    Yeah? Here's a dose of reality. Try sleeping with these three little sausages. My bed looks worse then a breakfast plate by morning.
    The Alameda Kids
  • Skeptikat DoxieDad 2012/07/13 03:47:07
  • twocrows 2012/07/12 01:26:24
    Yes, without a doubt.
    twocrows
    +5
    BUT- - I think what he said was a dog-whistle. the smirk he greeted the booing with told the tale: he was saying to the TP-ers, "See? I'm not flip-flopping in front of an audience that likes Obamacare. I'm sticking it to these black people. vote for me."

    fortunately for the country, he's talking to 2 - 3% of the nation: the top 1% of the economy and the bottom feeders whose sole goal is to hurt people who have even less than they do.
  • Skeptikat twocrows 2012/07/12 05:49:48
  • twocrows Skeptikat 2012/07/12 06:07:35
    twocrows
    +4
    aamof, after I wrote the above comment I watched the evening shows tonight and they reported that he told the truth to a bunch of supporters later in the day.
    he said, right up front, something to the effect of, "If those people [dog whistle right there] want free stuff from the government, they should vote for the other guy."

    how cynical he is. he knows full well that the vast majority of the members of the NAACP are going to vote for Obama in any case. so he wasn't losing any votes by making the AHCA into an 'us vs. them' issue.
    and dollars to doughnuts, the second audience he spoke to didn't even realize how they were being played. like a $2.00 fiddle. they'll just go to the polls and put an X by Romney's name BECAUSE he played the race card today.

    he's not just cynical. he's disgusting.
  • Skeptikat twocrows 2012/07/12 07:07:52
  • Bill Skeptikat 2012/07/14 15:49:54 (edited)
    Bill
    Yeah, yeah, yeah. And when W. didn't go, he was an uncaring racist. You guys have it both ways. You criticize when he is not reaching out to Blacks and knock him when he does.

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