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Police officer tasered 9-year-old twice

Quietman ~PWCM~JLA 2012/03/12 23:12:23
Mayor Charlie Neff issued the suspensions after he was told that a village police officer had shocked a 9-year-old boy with a Taser earlier in the week during an arrest. Neff said McCoy should have immediately reported the incident to Neff and council members. He did not.

Officer Scott O’Neil, who used the Taser twice Tuesday morning on 9-year-old Jared Perry, did not respond to calls on Friday for comment. Village officials, however, released a copy of O’Neil’s report this morning.

The sheriff’s office had requested an officer check the boy’s S. Market Street address on because there was an outstanding unruly juvenile complaint filed against him because he was truant from school.

According to O’Neil’s written account: He arrived at the home just before 8:30 a.m. to take the boy into custody. Jared refused to cooperate and wouldn’t put on his shoes to go with the officer. He begged his mother, Michelle Perry, to let him go to school rather than with the officer, but Perry told her son it was too late.

O’Neil wrote that after repeated warnings, he pulled Jared from the couch but the boy “dropped to the floor and became dead weight ... flailing around.” The officer wrote that Jared —who is listed as between 5 foot 5 and 5 foot 8 inches tall and between 200 and 250 pounds — laid on his hands to prevent being handcuffed.

The report indicates that O’Neil warned that he would use the Taser, and demonstrated the electrical current into the air “as a show of force” to gain the boy’s cooperation. He wrote that Jared’s mother was telling her son to do as O’Neil said or else he would be shocked.

O’Neil wrote that after he shocked Jared the first time, he still refused to cooperate and so he was shocked a second time.

Read More: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012...

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Top Opinion

  • Brother John 2012/03/12 23:41:32
    Brother John
    +3
    I wasn't there but it seems that the officer was in no danger. If that is the case this was an unjustified use of a taser. I doubt seriously that the department's protocol allows for it's use to coerce an 8th grader to put on his shoes. I also doubt it is a legal use of force against a non compliant but non combative minor.

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  • Doug King 2012/03/13 21:02:03
    Doug King
    +1
    Good for the Mayor!
  • Glenn Mitchell 2012/03/13 02:40:36
    Glenn Mitchell
    +1
    It does seem excessive but I wasn't there either.
  • jaymz 2012/03/13 02:39:41
    jaymz
    +1
    punk should have stayed down lol hell stun his ass again
  • BackWoodsMike 2012/03/13 00:13:11 (edited)
    BackWoodsMike
    +2
    I'm not going to defend the Officer's action in TAZE'ING the kid. It was wrong..

    First off, the kids momma shouldn't have called law enforcement in the first place if the kid was unarmed and just throwing a tantrum. I was called out once where a 12 year old boy was brandishing a knife at his mother, and that's a different story. After relieving the lad of the knife I called my Sargent for assistance, and he came out with a Child Services Officer who was trained in dealing with juveniles.

    The Officer in question should have informed momma that the child is 9 years old (no matter how big he is physically), and he is her responsibility as a parent, and he would be more than happy to contact Child Services if she can't control her own son.

    We (Law Enforcement) should not be called to respond just because a parent can't take care of their own child when they throw a fit.
  • Brother John 2012/03/12 23:41:32
    Brother John
    +3
    I wasn't there but it seems that the officer was in no danger. If that is the case this was an unjustified use of a taser. I doubt seriously that the department's protocol allows for it's use to coerce an 8th grader to put on his shoes. I also doubt it is a legal use of force against a non compliant but non combative minor.
  • Walt 2012/03/12 23:22:11
    Walt
    +2
    The argument police departments all over the country used when their requests for tasers were opposed was, "Tasers are a replacement for having to use our guns."

    Given that this was the predominant argument, police officers should not be allowed to use a taser for any other reason than they are choosing not to draw their weapons. In other words, if the situation does not merit lethal force, use of tasers should not be an option.
  • Brother... Walt 2012/03/12 23:43:13
    Brother John
    +3
    Agreed. I'm not opposed to tasers, I'm opposed to tasers being used in situations where no danger exists for the officer or some other person.
  • BackWoo... Brother... 2012/03/13 00:21:27
    BackWoodsMike
    +1
    We (Law Enforcement) should not be called to respond just because a parent can't take care of their own child when they throw a fit (unless the juvenile is armed). If the parent can not control their own child, then Child Services should be called, so that a person trained in dealing with the situation can respond.
  • Brother... BackWoo... 2012/03/13 00:34:09
    Brother John
    +1
    That may be however in many municipalities the Police Department is the first responder even when Child Services is called. I agree that this shouldn't be a police issue but that doesn't excuse the actions of the officer once he responded.
  • BackWoo... Brother... 2012/03/13 01:01:11 (edited)
    BackWoodsMike
    Just as a point of information (which took very little searching), the small “Mount Sterling Village Police Department” consisting of mostly part time (Non POST certified Officers) was decommissioned after this incident.

    http://www.springfieldnewssun...

    PS: POST Certification means that you must graduate from a Law Enforcement Academy and serve OJT with a Training Officer for a minimum of six months. Our Department will not allow an Officer to “solo” until we are fully POST certified.

    PPS: I believe I expressed my opinion about the behavior of the Officer, and that I will not defend his actions.
  • Brother... BackWoo... 2012/03/13 01:11:05
    Brother John
    +1
    I think there has been a misunderstanding. I agree with you. I'm not sure what I wrote to give the impression that I did not. In any case I apologize for my poor attempt at communication. I also realize you were not defending the officer in question.
  • BackWoo... Brother... 2012/03/13 01:24:31 (edited)
    BackWoodsMike
    +1
    I apologize for coming on a bit strong.

    I joined the Sheriff's Department at the age of 62 (4 years ago) and did go through the Academy and the six months riding with a training Officer. Law Enforcement was always one of the professions I wanted to get in, but my career as an Engineer was doing too well for me to quit, so I waited until I retired.

    I did serve as an Evidence Analyst for the Philadelphia Office of NCIS (while serving as a Navy Reserve Officer), but unlike what you see on the TV, NCIS is not a Law Enforcement Officers best job.
    http://www.sodahead.com/user/...

    Be safe,
    Mike
  • BackWoo... Walt 2012/03/13 00:26:28
    BackWoodsMike
    +1
    The Police should not be called (unless there is a weapon involved) just because a parent can't control their own child!

    Next thing you know, people will be calling the Police because the McDonalds screwed up their order.... Oh yeh.. That's already been done!
  • Walt BackWoo... 2012/03/13 04:08:10
    Walt
    +1
    There's no doubt you are correct. There are some absurd people in the world who will call for police assistance for literally nothing.

    (As a side note, when I was growing up, my mother taught her children not to call the police unless there was a vital reason, since the outcome can be unpredictable.)

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