Quantcast

Number 2 owner of Fox News is Saudi Prince

Mel 2013/12/30 15:57:52
A Contrast: A Saudi Prince’s influence on Fox News vs. Murdoch family’s lack of influence on Rotana
by on April 25, 2013 in Blog, General

Last year, Rupert Murdoch’s Newscorp. significantly increased its ownership in a media entity headed by Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal.

Via Arabian Business:

News Corp will pay $35m for the shares, which will take its stake in Rotana to 18.97 percent. Last year, News Corp upped its stake to 14.53 percent.

The acquisition was announced after a meeting of the Rotana board chaired by Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, chairman of Rotana Holding, the Saudi Gazette reported.

Rotana owns the Arab world’s largest record label and about 40 percent of the region’s movies, and operates a number of free-to-air television channels.

Conversely, Bin Talal is the second largest shareholder of Newscorp. As such, the Saudi Prince has demonstrated an ability to influence how news is portrayed on Fox News Channel. For example, back in 2005, during coverage of Muslim riots in France, Fox News displayed a banner that identified the riots for what they were – “Muslim riots”.

Bin Talal relayed what happened next, via Think Progress:

I picked up the phone and called Murdoch… (and told him) these are not Muslim riots, these are riots out of poverty. Within 30 minutes, the title was changed from Muslim riots to civil riots.

This leads us to the kind of programming that airs on the Rotanna network. Does Rupert Murdoch or his son James have the ability to influence Rotana content? Assuming that both are appalled by songs that glorify martyrdom and programs that heap praise on hardened criminals, the answer is most likely no.

First, consider the example of Lebanese singer Fadl Shaker. During a lengthy interview he gave that appeared on Rotana Khalījīya, he sang the following song, translated thusly:

“O Mother, my religion calls me for Jihad and martyrdom.
O Mother I am going to eternity and I will not falter.
O Mother do not cry if I became one of the fallen.
Death does not scare me for my wish is to be martyred.

It’s ‘Allahu Akbar’, every time the bombs sing.
It’s Allahu Akbar, when the bullets announce their sound and chirp. It’s Allahu Akbar, the blood of my brothers is not in vain.

Victory is coming forth and righteousness has elevated its heat.
We refuse to submit and our concern is to erect our banner forever.
We refuse to bow to tyrants.
Death does not fear me and my wish is to be martyred.”

Now that you know what Saker sang, have a look at him singing it:

Is it a good thing to be afflicted with Islamophobia? Get the new book from Walid Shoebat, The Case FOR ISLAMOPHOBIA: Jihad by the Word; America’s Final Warning.

Another interview that aired on a Rotana program featured a convicted and hardened criminal named Homaidan Al-Turki, who is serving a prison sentence in Colorado for – among other things – theft, human trafficking, enslavement, rape, and molestation of an Indonesian minor. One does not need this interview translated to see that Al-Turki is being a given a platform and presented to an audience that very much wants his release.

Among other things, these examples seem to demonstrate that Bin Talal has the power to exert his influence on Fox News to the point of getting the network to retract truthful reporting. Conversely, the Murdochs are either incapable or unwilling to demand Talal’s network not promote criminals and criminal behavior.

Share this:

Read More: http://shoebat.com/2013/04/25/a-contrast-a-saudi-p...

You!
Add Photos & Videos

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • A Founding Father 2013/12/31 02:31:48
    A Founding Father
    Well, haven't I been telling you for two years that the Saudi King has an outlet here in America broadcasting Anti-American propaganda 24/7 as part of the King's world-wide jihad and promise to destroy all "Western cultures"? Of course, his jihad is "fair and balanced", as all you zombies and supporters know.
  • sjalan 2013/12/30 22:17:00
    sjalan
    +1
    Rather simple, not only are we being misled by the Rabid Radical Political/Religious Right who use Faux Newz to spread misinformation and out right lies but we have a FOREIGN share owner of Faux Newz telling the primary share owner what to do!!

    If ever there was a case for shutting down Faux Newz this just takes the cake.
  • Mel sjalan 2013/12/31 00:41:55
    Mel
    +1
    Plus, I posted two separate resources on this and the people denying this have not posted anything to the contrary. Notice that? I raved you BTW
  • sjalan Mel 2013/12/31 01:18:48
    sjalan
    +1
    Yep I noticed that too. If I remember correctly too, a media firm cannot be owned by a foreign national .
  • Mel sjalan 2013/12/31 04:12:04
    Mel
    +1
    Well Fox is not an American corporation. They're ownership is Australian. Rupert Murdoch is a citizen of Australia. And because they're not an American network that pays to be on cable and sat dish networks is why they can only be seen if you subscribe to such. There's no way they can be mainstream. However under FCC rules they can have affiliate stations as regular channels. This is an FCC exception that pisses me off. The only fox things I watch are Fox Sports. No politics there.
  • sjalan Mel 2013/12/31 05:37:04
    sjalan
    +1
    Myself I think I'd challenge that FCC rule since it still allows for outside influence of a major owner of the network's way of reporting as you have pointed out.

    To continue to allow that to happen will continue to result in a division of our nation and eventual demise.
  • Mel 2013/12/30 21:28:43
    Mel
    Hey Jackie G, read this! Another source:
    Saudis Influencing Fox News
    It is of the utmost importance to begin to notice, to scrutinize and assess what Fox covers and -- more important -- what it doesn't and why.

    BY RYAN MAURO Mon, February 18, 2013
    PrintPrintEmailEmail
    Related Stories
    Headlines
    Human Rights Watch Report Condemns Saudi Repression
    Saudi Women Return to the Roads Defying Driving Ban
    Top 12 Moderate Muslim Moments in 2013
    Bombings Target Christians in Iraq: Part of a Larger Story
    Saudi Prince Alwaleed (inset) initially purchased 5.5 percent of voting stock in Fox News. He now owns 7 percent. The effects have already been felt in the network's coverage.
    Saudi Prince Alwaleed (inset) initially purchased 5.5 percent of voting stock in Fox News. He now owns 7 percent. The effects have already been felt in the network's coverage.
    In the following interview, RadicalIslam.org National Security Analyst Ryan Mauro speaks to Diana West, a nationally syndicated conservative American columnist and author, about the impact of the partial ownership of Fox news by Saudi Prince Alwaleed.

    Ryan Mauro: You have devoted a lot of your time towards covering Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal. Can you tell us about him and why he warrants this attention?

    Diana West: Prince Alwaleed bin T...





























    &

    &





























































































    Hey Jackie G, read this! Another source:
    Saudis Influencing Fox News
    It is of the utmost importance to begin to notice, to scrutinize and assess what Fox covers and -- more important -- what it doesn't and why.

    BY RYAN MAURO Mon, February 18, 2013
    PrintPrintEmailEmail
    Related Stories
    Headlines
    Human Rights Watch Report Condemns Saudi Repression
    Saudi Women Return to the Roads Defying Driving Ban
    Top 12 Moderate Muslim Moments in 2013
    Bombings Target Christians in Iraq: Part of a Larger Story
    Saudi Prince Alwaleed (inset) initially purchased 5.5 percent of voting stock in Fox News. He now owns 7 percent. The effects have already been felt in the network's coverage.
    Saudi Prince Alwaleed (inset) initially purchased 5.5 percent of voting stock in Fox News. He now owns 7 percent. The effects have already been felt in the network's coverage.
    In the following interview, RadicalIslam.org National Security Analyst Ryan Mauro speaks to Diana West, a nationally syndicated conservative American columnist and author, about the impact of the partial ownership of Fox news by Saudi Prince Alwaleed.

    Ryan Mauro: You have devoted a lot of your time towards covering Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal. Can you tell us about him and why he warrants this attention?

    Diana West: Prince Alwaleed bin Talal is usually described as a billionaire Saudi businessman, but he is also a senior member of the Saudi monarchy. He is the nephew of the Saudi dictator, King Abdullah, and the first cousin of the Saudi interior minister, Prince Mohammed bin Nayef. He is also the largest stakeholder in Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. outside the Murdoch family.

    We may not realize it, but most of us first heard about Prince Alwaleed bin Talal in the immediate aftermath 9/11. That was when a "Saudi prince" -- it was Alwaleed -- became infamous for having donated $10 million to the Twin Towers Fund only to have then-mayor Rudy Giuliani return the check.

    Why did Giuliani return the check? It became clear the prince wasn't making a donation but rather a political statement. After presenting the money, the prince issued a press release blaming the 9/11 attacks on American support for Israel -- while, as Alwaleed's statement read, "our Palestinian brethren continue to be slaughtered at the hands of the Israelis.”

    As the San Francisco Chronicle reported at theNY City Mayor during the 9/11 attack Rudolph Giuliani
    NY City Mayor during the 9/11 attack Rudolph Giuliani
    time, Giuliani hadn't seen see this press release when he initially accepted the Saudi check among others from government and private industry leaders. In a separate letter Guliani did read, Alwaleed had expressed only condolences for "the loss of life that the city of New York has suffered," while condemning "all forms of terrorism." The Saudi prince wrote: "In doing so I am reiterating Saudi Arabia's strong stance against these tragic and horrendous acts."

    That was fine. It was the press release attached to the letter that was not fine. This statement, also in Alwaleed's name, sought to blame U.S. policy on "the Palestinian cause" for the attack. It said:

    "However, at times like this one, we must address some of the issues that led to such a criminal attack. I believe the government of the United States of America should re-examine its policies in the Middle East and adopt a more balanced stance toward the Palestinian cause.

    "Our Palestinian brethren continue to be slaughtered at the hands of Israelis while the world turns the other cheek."

    The Chronicle report continued:

    The mayor, who had been told of the press release just moments before his daily briefing but after receiving the check, was visibly annoyed. "I entirely reject that statement," he said. "That's totally contrary to what I said at the United Nations," he added, referring to his address there last Monday.

    "There is no moral equivalent for this act," the mayor said. "There is no justification for it. The people who did it lost any right to ask for justification for it when they slaughtered 4,000 or 5,000 innocent people. And to suggest that there's a justification for it only invites this happening in the future. It is highly irresponsible and very, very dangerous."

    The mayor added that he might consult with the State Department before deciding what to do with the check; an hour later, his press office released a statement attributed to the mayor that the check would not be accepted.

    A spokesman for the prince, Amjed Shacker, who was reached on his cell phone as he prepared to board a plane for Saudi Arabia, said he knew of no such rejection and indeed seemed perplexed to learn of it.

    Giuliani's very public rebuff was very popular, including among star personalities at Fox News. At the time, it is important to note, Alwaleed did not own any voting stock in News Corp. Here's what some of them said (I hate to cite Media Matters but so be it):

    Sean Hannity
    Sean Hannity
    Sean Hannity: Al-Waleed's statement was "such an egregious, outrageous, unfair offense that I would have nothing to do with his money either." On the October 22, 2001, edition of Fox News' Hannity & Colmes (accessed via Nexis), Sean Hannity said, "[T]his is a man that blames the United States and their policies for the attack that took place on September 11th. That is such an egregious, outrageous, unfair offense that I would have nothing to do with his money either, and I applaud what Mayor Giuliani did. It showed a lot of guts and character."

    Hannity: "This is a bad guy. Rudy was right to decline the money." On the December 13, 2005, edition of Hannity & Colmes (accessed via Nexis), while discussing a grant Al-Waleed gave Georgetown and Harvard universities, Hannity said: "This is a bad guy. Rudy was right to decline the money. Why would these universities take money from him?"

    Mara Liasson: "[I]t was an outrageousMara Liasson
    Mara Liasson
    statement and the mayor did the right thing and refused the money." Discussing Giuliani's decision to return the money on the October 11, 2001, edition of Fox News' Special Report (accessed via Nexis), Fox News contributor Mara Liasson said Al-Waleed's statement was "completely false," "outrageous" and that "the mayor did the right thing and refused the money."

    Bill Sammon: "[I]t's blood money, and we're better off without it." During the same discussion with Liasson, Fox News Washington managing editor Bill Sammon said of the money, "[W]hen you think about it, upon reflection, you think, you know, this guy is essentially trying to buy Bill Sammon
    Bill Sammon
    legitimacy for his extreme views, which is, you know, that the American policy towards Israel is to blame for this attack on the World Trade Center, which, of course, is outrageous, as Mara says." He continued: "And so I think it was the right thing to turn it down --especially when you think about $10 million, in this grand scheme of $800 million. I mean, that's less than 2 percent of that. And when you look at the generosity of the American people, you know, that $10 million could be made up by people who are outraged by this very story. So I don't think -- I think it's blood money and we're better off without it."

    Following Giuliani's rebuff, Alwaleed opened his purse in 2002 to the families of killers instead, donating a whopping $27 million to a Saudi telethon raising money for the Committee for the Support of the al-Quds Intifada, a Saudi "charity" chaired by the then-Interior Minister of Saudi Arabia (now Crown Prince Nayef, another uncle of Alwaleed's). He gave $500,000 that same year to CAIR, the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas-linked group.

    Also in 2002, however, Alwaleed seems to have had something of an epiphany. From the Arab News (which Alwaleed also owns):

    Arab countries can influence U.S. decison-making "if they unite through economic interests, not political,"Saudi Prince Alwaleed
    Saudi Prince Alwaleed
    [Alwaleed] stressed. "We have to be logical and understand that the U.S. administration is subject to U.S. public opinion. We are not so active in this sphere [public opinion]. And to bring the decision-maker on your side, you not only have to be active inside the U.S. Congress or the administration but also inside U.S. society."

    Soon, the Saudi billionaire was spending his money quite differently -- no more Palestinian grandstanding, no more Saudi telethons, no more CAIR. In 2005, Alwaleed purchased a 5.5 percent stake of voting stock in the Murdoch-owned News Corp (he now owns 7 percent). He also spent $40 million to enlarge Islamic studies on leading American campuses, donating $20 million to Harvard to create a university-wide Islamic studies program, which also boosted Islamic law (sharia) studies on campus, and $20 million to Georgetown to set up the Alwaleed Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding under Islamic apologist John Esposito.

    The News Corp. investment began paying off right away. Also in 2005, with Muslims rioting in Paris in the worst street violence since 1968, Alwaleed telephoned Rupert Murdoch, as Alwaleed himself told an audience in Dubai, and said "these are not Muslim riots, they are riots." Presto, the Fox News crawl about "Muslim riots in Paris" across the bottom of the screen changed to "civil riots."

    Alwaleed has not made further public statements about news coverage he has shaped, but how could this not have been just the beginning? Is this ownership-influence cause for alarm among Americans -- and particularly conservative Americans -- seeking "fair and balanced" news and opinion from Fox News and other Murdoch properties? I maintain that it is.

    Ryan Mauro: Alwaleed is known as more of a reformer than a Wahhabist because he believes Saudi women should be permitted to drive, for example. Is he necessarily an Islamist or is it possible he's just a powerful man who believes U.S. support for Israel is the root cause of terrorism?

    Diana West: Regardless of how sincere Alwaleed may or may not be regarding women and driving, I don't think we should count advocacy of driving as a badge of reform. Alwaleed's call for the right to drive for women in Saudi Arabia is but window dressing if, for example, he is also silent regarding the right to speak one's mind, which is also denied due to the totalitarian nature of Saudi-Islamic culture.

    A primary problem with Islam is its totalitarian control of speech and conscience. One could easily advocate women's right to drive and still sit by quietly as "apostates" are threatened with death under Islamic law -- as indeed Alwaleed does. Two cases came to light recently in which Saudi men expressed (mild) criticism of Islam (one of them via Twitter, which Alwaleed partly owns). They were both arrested; one was specifically pursued on order Saudi King Abdullah
    Saudi King Abdullah
    from King Abdullah, Alwaleed's uncle, and the other by the interior minister, Mohammed bin Nayef, who is Alwleed's first cousin. Has Alwaleed banged the drum over such outrages? Of course not. Neither, I would add, has Fox News. Its one report about the former, a man named Hamza Kashgari, was delivered by Brett Baier. It could have been written by a Saudi censor. Note the use of the passive voice that removes all Saudi government volition, as well as the statement's treatment of Mohammed (treatment Jesus and Moses never get):

    "Finally, a young Saudi blogger has been sent back to his homeland to face trial and possible execution triggered by comments he made on Twitter that were seen as blasphemous against the Prophet Mohammed. Hamza Kashgari has apologized for sending three tweets of a fictional conversation with the prophet Mohammed that quickly sparked thousands of angry responses and even death threats. No official reaction from the Saudi government.”

    Another example: The Daily Mail (not a Murdoch property) recently reported that there are "scores" of foreign women (maids from Third World countries) on death row in Saudi Arabia for convictions of witchcraft, child abuse and killing would-be rapists. I don't see Alwaleed interceding on their behalf -- even after the president of Indonesia asked him to intercede for one Indonesian maid who killed her employer while he was attempting to rape her. That request came over one year ago and she's still on death row. Alwaleed may have made efforts on her behalf privately; we don't know, but he has not, to my knowledge, done anything publicly to call attention to this or other such cases. No one as powerful as Alwaleed who remains silent in the face of what we should think of as the Saudi gulag is anything but an ally of it -- which in my view means he doesn't rise to esteemed level of a reformer.

    As for your second question (aside from the fact I don't use the term "Islamist" for reasons we could go into if you like), it's not my intent to rule out one or the other, but rather to consider Alwaleed's potential influence on American conservative media, and the ramifications this has for conditioning the American response to expanding Islam.

    Ryan Mauro: Is there any evidence of Alwaleed's influence in the media since 2005? And if his influence is so strong, why does Fox News continue to have people on that are tough on Saudi Arabia, Al-Jazeera and the Muslim Brotherhood, including top foes of CAIR like Zuhdi Jasser?

    Diana West: As I will expand upon below, Fox News covers security threats, terrorism, and war. Zuhdi Jasser and others oppose the "extremism" that fuels them all without identifying such "extremism" as the mainstream Islamic doctrine set by Mohammed and the Koran. There's a big difference, which I am happy to discuss if you like another time. Meanwhile, the appearance of one or more such guests is no way compensates for the seemingly strategic and certainly gaping holes in Fox's coverage, also noted below.

    Alwaleed has not made news for bragging publicly about his influence over Fox News since that one incident in 2005. As for "evidence" of his influence, I know of no directive, no reported conversation, no "defector" from Fox or News Corp. reporting that Awaleed, or anyone else, has set guidelines for coverage in discussion, let alone in black and white.

    But that's not how influence usually works. It is intangible, something no more concrete than a rejected story, something no less natural than the body of stories that develops from such editorial discretion, which, of course, can also includes positive reinforcement. Such stimuli may reflect active owner-influence. They may also reflect a more passive owner-influence as when an employee -- producer, editor, writer, anchor, pundit -- anticipates the boss's desires and writes or reports a certain way. This phenomenon, of course, is by no means unique to Fox, just as it is by no means unique to journalism.

    If we examine Fox's body of work I believe the unspoken guidelines for coverage and discussion become quite clear. As noted above, Fox News covers terrorism, war, national security. It does not cover, let alone chronicle, the introduction of sharia -- Islamic law -- into the West. It does not cover the massive ongoing Islamic movement by which the Western world is being rapidly Islamized. It does not cover what the Muslim Brotherhood calls "civilization jihad." It does not cover the disappearance of Western culture in Europe. What we know as "political correctness" probably keeps such issues off the air in the MSM, but Fox makes a point of rising above such PC. I think the news vacuum we can see on Fox is at least partly a result of News Corp.'s Saudi influence. Such influence does not serve the American public interest.

    Al Gore
    Al Gore
    Before I explain, let's go back just to the beginning of last month when Al Gore' sale of Current TV to Al Jazeera was big news, particularly on Fox. As Fox personalities repeatedly (and understandably) revelled in Gore's obvious hypocrisies for selling out to an Islamic oil-and-greenhouse-gas dictatorship, I was struck by something important that was being left out: The fact that a key Fox stakeholder -- the second largest stakeholder outside the Murdoch family -- was himself a leading member of an Islamic oil-and-greehouse-gas dictatorship. It seemed highly relevant at least in the spirit of full disclosure, even if it might have subdued some of the on-air guffaws.

    I would also note that the Fox focus was on Gore himself -- much less so on the security-related side of the story, which includes how Al Jazeera is a foreign policy instrument of the Qatari dictatorship, which, in turn, is basically a foreign policy instrument of the Muslim Brotherhood. (Indeed, Al Jazeera's nickname is Muslim Brotherhood TV.) Similarly, with rare exceptions, News Corp. journalists didn't enlighten viewers and readers about the noxious Yusef al Qaradawi, a Muslim Brotherhood cleric, and his central role at Al Jazeera and, indeed, in the wider "Arab Spring."

    As I reconsidered the Murdoch-Alwaleed relationship, I was struck anew not only by the 7 percent of News Corp. that Alwaleed owns, but also by the 18.97 percent of Rotana, Alawaleed's Arabic media group, that Murdoch owns. I discovered that just as Murdoch-Alwaleed holdings include Fox, Alwaleed-Murdoch holdings include Al Risala, a Prince Alwaleed with Rupert Murdock
    Prince Alwaleed with Rupert Murdock
    24/7 religious station run by a Kuwaiti Muslim Brother named Tareq al-Suwaidon. Al-Suwaidan, who doubles as a popular on-air host at Al Risala, is not just any Muslim Brother, either. He is an unindicted co-conspirator in the largest terrorism-financing trial in US history, the Holy Land Foundation trial. That means the US government believes Al-Suwaidon, too, was involved in fund-raising for Hamas. That means that Murdoch and Alwaleed's cable stable includes O'Reilly, Doocey and Al-Suwaidon, aka, Mr. Hamas.

    That's not the only appalling connection the Saudi association brings to News Corp. On the advisory board of Al Risala is Abdullah Omar Naseef, whose Rabita Trust has been designated by the US Treasury as an Al Qaeda financier (see photo).The structural parallels may be somewhat imperfect but they are still illustrative: Just as Alwaleed has a business connection to News Corp. board member Roger Ailes, Murdoch has a business connection to Al Risala board member and al Qaeda financier Naseef.

    That's reality.

    As for analysis, it is of the utmost importance to begin to notice, to scrutinize and assess what Fox covers and -- I think more important -- what it doesn't.

    What becomes clear quickly is that Fox never, ever covers the amazing, shocking and terrifying stories that reflect the undermining incursions of sharia (Islamic law) into the West.

    We are living through a cultural transformation of epochal significance as one civilization (Western) yields with barely a peep to another (Islamic). This process is well-advanced on the European continent, where Islamic "no-go zones" proliferate in urban centers (or suburbs) and parallel legal societies have taken hold from London to Berlin. (Sharia courts are even recognized by the British government.) "Desertification" is a new French word for the flight of indigenous French people from Islamized neighborhoods. Government elites of Europe respond to such unrest and unhappiness by silencing the critics of Islamization, putting them on trial for "hate speech" violations, and even sometimes in prison (particularly in the UK). This is what's going on in the democracies of the West -- UK, France, Austria, Denmark, Holland -- and Fox viewers don't know it unless they learn it somewhere else.

    This is happening here, too. Mark Steyn, one of Fox's leading lights, went on trial for "hate speech" next door in Canada. Did Fox ever report on his trial, let along interview him about it? If so, I didn't see it.

    Michele Bachmann
    Michele Bachmann
    There is turmoil in many US localities over the proliferation of Islamic centers and the Islamic law that necessarily follows them but that's largely another no-go subject at Fox as far as I can tell. What about a free speech case about Islam in the U.S. military? On the Manhattan subway platform? What about push-back against Islamization by state legislatures to bar sharia from U.S.law? Is any of reported in any sort of consistent and informational, nay, educational way on Fox? Not much, at best. Not even House conservatives, including Rep. Michele Bachmann, who raised questions about Muslim Brotherhood penetration of the US government last summer got a fair hearing on Fox.

    I should point out here that the al Qaeda financier Naseef, noted above for his place on the board of Alaleed-Murdoch's Al Risala TV, also financed the institution and journal run by the MB-connected family of Huma Abedin, Hillary Clinton's top aide. As Clinton's confidante, Abedin's MB-connections are something Michele Bachmann and her House colleagues raised questions about last summer in the context of Muslim Brotherhood penetration of the US government. Fox didn't cover that piece of it, either. I find the coverage – or lack thereof – of this U.S. story in particular, quite alarming.

    But the same silence goes for last week's broad-daylight assassination attempt in Copenhagen on Lars Hedegaard, aLars Hedegard
    Lars Hedegard
    Danish newspaper editor and opponent of European Islamization by an Arab or Pakistani gunman. Not newsworthy for a mention on O'Reilly or Greta or The Five. Why not? In 2010, another Musim man tried to kill a Danish cartoonist named Kurt Westergaard over a cartoon of Mohammed that Musims worldwide had reacted to with violence (over 100 people were killed on rioting), mayhem and boycotts. Fox viewers have never even gotten a look at Westergaard'ss cartoon, either -- except for maybe long ago when Michelle Malkin appeared on the air holding it. Similarly, Fox viewers didn't get to follow the Kafka-esque hate speech trial endured by Geert Wilders, democratically elected leader of a significant political party in Dutch parliament, even though Wilders is someone who has made many appearances in the USA. (Wilders did get on with Sean Hannity last year to promote his Regnery book, Marked for Death.)

    Could the blackout of such news have anything at all to do with the aims of the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation -- the Islamic bloc of 56 Islamic nations (plus the PA) whose headquarters, by the way, is in Saudi Arabia -- and its efforts (lately in conjunction with Hillary Clinton, which is also uncovered on Fox) to introduce international mechanisms to criminalize criticism of Islam everywhere? After all, the OIC has specifically singled out both Geert Wilders and the Danish cartoons for censure, and they are basically non-persons, non-events in the US media, including on Fox News. Is this entirely a coincidence?

    [ad] I doubt it, even as I also doubt there's much in the way of smoking guns on the topic. It gets in the air and stays there, with fly-bys from the Saudi Prince to provide an insuring chilling effect, while the fortunes of the Big Boss sink increasingly into the sands of desert financial markets. Thus, the Saudi-based OIC's goals, Westerns fear of Islamic violence, the self-censorship of "political correctness" and Fox's silence all dovetail neatly to black out news for conservatives in America.

    I am speculating, to be sure, but is it off-base or illogical to do so? For sure, the Murdoch-Alwaleed collaboration ties News Corp. to some very unsavory and anti-American associates. It amazes me this isn't enough to rile the O'Reillys and hound the Hannitys, etc., into complaining that Murdoch is damaging their brand. It also amazes me viewers don't see the brand as damaged. Of course, what they don't know won't make them change the channel.

    If I am correct and Alwaleed bought into News Corp to neutralize the jihad opposition, it's one of the most brilliant influence operations ever. The Saudis would have managed to silence the one organization whose coverage of the news could have rallied opposition to Islamization.

    Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, May 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).

    Her weekly newspaper column is syndicated by Universal Uclick. West also serves as the Washington Correspondent for the new European weekly newspaper Dispatch International. West is one of 19 co-authors (including Frank Gaffney, Andrew C. McCarthy and James Woolsey) of Shariah: The Threat to America, a 2010 publication of the Center for Security Policy.

    West's work has appeared in many publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, The Weekly Standard, and The Washington Post Magazine, and her fiction has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly. She has made numerous television and radio appearances, and was recently featured in the Glenn Beck TV documentaries "The Project" and "Rumors of War III."

    She blogs at dianawest.net.
    (more)
  • granada 2013/12/30 17:10:27
    granada
    Saudi's oil money is as green as Qatar's. Al Gore knew it.
  • Jackie G - Poker Playing Pa... 2013/12/30 17:06:19
    Jackie G - Poker Playing Patriot
    There is not stock being bought or sold by FOX News - it is a wholly owned company

    Stupidity run rampant, get a damn grip, if you do not understand that Murdoch owns the parent company and has controlling stock with 21st Century FOX (another Murdoch company) as the second largest stock holder of New Corp; please just hush and stop being foolish




    Things owned by News Corp

    Internet

    Authonomy via HarperCollins

    Magazines and inserts

    All titles sourced from News Limited - NewsSource: Magazines on 15 October 2010.

    Australian Golf Digest
    Australian Good Taste (with Woolworths)
    Australian Parents (with Woolworths)
    Best of the Gold Coast Magazine
    Big League
    Country Style
    delicious. (with the ABC)
    donna hay
    Gardening Australia (with the ABC)
    GQ Australia
    Inside Out
    Lifestyle Pools outdoor design
    MasterChef Magazine
    SmartSource Magazine
    Super Food Ideas
    Vogue Australia
    Newspapers and information services[edit]

    United Kingdom
    News UK
    The Sun
    The Times
    Sunday Times

    Australia
    News Corp Australia

    Metropolitan newspapers, magazines and news distribution channels

    National
    The Australian including weekly insert magazine The Deal and monthly insert magazine
    The Weekend Australian including insert magazine The Weekend Australian Magazine
    Australian Associated Press (45%)
    www.news.co...

    &

































































    &





















    &
    &






























    &















































    &

























    &



























    There is not stock being bought or sold by FOX News - it is a wholly owned company

    Stupidity run rampant, get a damn grip, if you do not understand that Murdoch owns the parent company and has controlling stock with 21st Century FOX (another Murdoch company) as the second largest stock holder of New Corp; please just hush and stop being foolish




    Things owned by News Corp

    Internet

    Authonomy via HarperCollins

    Magazines and inserts

    All titles sourced from News Limited - NewsSource: Magazines on 15 October 2010.

    Australian Golf Digest
    Australian Good Taste (with Woolworths)
    Australian Parents (with Woolworths)
    Best of the Gold Coast Magazine
    Big League
    Country Style
    delicious. (with the ABC)
    donna hay
    Gardening Australia (with the ABC)
    GQ Australia
    Inside Out
    Lifestyle Pools outdoor design
    MasterChef Magazine
    SmartSource Magazine
    Super Food Ideas
    Vogue Australia
    Newspapers and information services[edit]

    United Kingdom
    News UK
    The Sun
    The Times
    Sunday Times

    Australia
    News Corp Australia

    Metropolitan newspapers, magazines and news distribution channels

    National
    The Australian including weekly insert magazine The Deal and monthly insert magazine
    The Weekend Australian including insert magazine The Weekend Australian Magazine
    Australian Associated Press (45%)
    www.news.com.au National online news website

    New South Wales & Australian Capital Territory
    The Canberra Times
    The Daily Telegraph
    The Sunday Telegraph including insert magazine sundaymagazine
    mX
    Victoria
    Herald Sun]
    Sunday Herald Sun including insert magazine sundaymagazine
    mX (Melbourne
    Queensland
    The Courier-Mail including weekly insert magazine QWeekend
    The Sunday Mail
    Brisbane News
    South Australia
    The Advertiser including the monthly insert the Adelaide* magazine
    Sunday Mail
    Western Australia
    The Sunday Times
    Tasmania
    The Mercury
    The Sunday Tasmanian
    Northern Territory
    Northern Territory News
    Sunday Territorian
    Community suburban newspapers
    Sydney
    Cumberland/Courier (NSW) newspapers
    Blacktown Advocate
    Canterbury-Bankstown Express
    Central
    Central Coast Express Advocate
    Fairfield Advance
    Hills Shire Times
    Hornsby and Upper North Shore Advocate
    Inner West Courier
    Liverpool Leader
    Macarthur Chronicle
    Mt Druitt-St Marys Standard
    NINETOFIVE
    North Shore Times
    Northern District Times
    NORTHSIDE
    Parramatta Advertiser
    Penrith Press
    Rouse Hill Times
    Southern Courier
    The Manly Daily
    The Mosman Daily

    Village Voice Balmain
    Wentworth Courier
    Melbourne
    Leader (Vic) newspapers
    Bayside Leader
    Berwick/Pakenham Cardinia Leader
    Brimbank Leader
    Caulfield Glen Eira/Port Philip Leader
    Cranbourne Leader
    Dandenong/Springvale Dandenong Leader
    Diamond Valley Leader
    Frankston Standard/Hastings Leader
    Free Press Leader
    Heidelberg Leader
    Hobsons Bay Leader
    Hume Leader
    Knox Leader
    Lilydale & Yarra Valley Leader
    Manningham Leader
    Maribyrnong Leader www.maribyrnongleader.com.au
    Maroondah Leader
    Melbourne Leader
    Melton/Moorabool Leader
    Moonee Valley Leader
    Moorabbin Kingston/Moorabbin Glen Eira Leader
    Mordialloc Chelsea Leader
    Moreland Leader
    Mornington Peninsula Leader
    Northcote Leader
    Preston Leader
    Progress Leader
    Stonnington Leader
    Sunbury/Macedon Ranges Leader
    Waverley/Oakleigh Monash Leader
    Whitehorse Leader
    Whittlesea Leader
    Wyndham Leader
    Brisbane
    Quest (QLD) newspapers
    Albert & Logan News (Fri)
    Albert & Logan News (Wed)
    Caboolture Shire Herald
    Caloundra Journal
    City News
    City North News
    City South News
    Ipswich News
    Logan West Leader
    Maroochy Journal
    North-West News
    Northern Times
    Northside Chronicle
    Pine Rivers Press/North Lakes Times
    Redcliffe and Bayside Herald
    South-East Advertiser
    South-West News/Springfield News
    Southern Star
    The Noosa Journal
    weekender
    Westside News
    Wynnum Herald
    Weekender Essential Sunshine Coast

    Adelaide
    Messenger (SA) newspapers
    Adelaide Matters
    City Messenger
    City North Messenger
    East Torrens Messenger
    Eastern Courier Messenger
    Guardian Messenger
    Hills & Valley Messenger
    Leader Messenger
    News Review Messenger
    Portside Messenger
    Southern Times Messenger
    Weekly Times Messenger
    Perth[edit]
    Community (WA) newspapers[23] (50.1%)
    Advocate
    Canning Times
    Comment News
    Eastern Reporter
    Fremantle-Cockburn Gazette
    Guardian Express
    Hills-Avon Valley Gazette
    Joondalup-Wanneroo Times
    Mandurah Coastal / Pinjarra Murray Times
    Melville Times
    Midland-Kalamunda Reporter
    North Coast Times
    Southern Gazette
    Stirling Times
    Weekend-Kwinana Courier
    Weekender
    Western Suburbs Weekly
    Darwin
    Sun (NT) newspapers
    Darwin Sun
    Litchfield Sun
    Palmerston Sun
    Regional and rural newspapers
    New South Wales[edit]
    Tweed Sun'
    Victoria
    Echo
    Geelong Advertiser
    GeelongNEWS
    The Weekly Times
    Queensland
    Ayr Advocate
    Bowen Independent
    Cairns Sun
    Gold Coast Bulletin
    Gold Coast Sun
    Herbert River Express
    Home Hill Observer
    Innisfail Advocate
    Northern Miner
    Port Douglas & Mossman Gazette
    Tablelander - Atherton
    Tablelands Advertiser
    The Cairns Post
    The Noosa Journal
    Townsville Bulletin
    Townsville Sun
    weekender
    Tasmania
    Derwent Valley Gazette
    Tasmanian Country
    Northern Territory
    Centralian Advocate
    Papua New Guinea
    Papua New Guinea Post-Courier

    United States
    New York Post
    Wall Street Journal
    Community Newspaper Group
    The Brooklyn Paper
    Courier-Life Publications
    TimesLedger Newspapers
    Bronx Times Reporter Inc.
    The Corning Leader
    International[edit]
    Dow Jones & Company

    Consumer Media Group
    The Wall Street Journal - the leading US financial newspaper.
    Wall Street Journal Europe
    Wall Street Journal Asia
    Barron's - weekly financial markets magazine.
    Marketwatch - Financial news and information website.
    Far Eastern Economic Review
    Financial News
    Enterprise Media Group
    Dow Jones Newswires - global, real-time news and information provider.
    Factiva - provides business news and information together with content delivery tools and services.
    Dow Jones Indexes - stock market indexes and indicators, including the Dow Jones Industrial Average.
    Dow Jones Financial Information Services — produces databases, electronic media, newsletters, conferences, directories, and other information services on specialised markets and industry sectors.
    Betten Financial News — leading Dutch language financial and economic news service.
    Local Media Group'
    Dow Jones Local Media Group (formerly Ottaway Community Newspapers) - 8 daily and 15 weekly regional newspapers.
    Strategic Alliances
    STOXX (33%) - joint venture with Deutsche Boerse and SWG Group for the development and distribution of Dow Jones STOXX indices.
    Vedomosti (33%) - Russia's leading financial newspaper (joint venture with Financial Times and Independent Media).
    SmartMoney (50%)
    FiLife.com (50%)

    FOX News is owned by 21 Century Fox (and prince owns stock in NewsCorp a separate company

    news corp

    WHEN YOU POST DRIVEL LIKE THIS, SUGGEST YOU DO JUST A LITTLE RESEARCH.
    (more)
  • 3DogsBa... Jackie ... 2013/12/30 18:13:13
    3DogsBarking
    He's the 2nd largest share holder of the parent company which makes him the 2nd largest owner no matter how you slice it considering the parent company owns the subsidiaries.
  • Jackie ... 3DogsBa... 2013/12/30 18:34:52
    Jackie G - Poker Playing Patriot
    He is of News Corp - we have no idea if he is of 21st Century FOX which owns, now, FOX news, National Geographic and a long list of others.

    This is insipid - no one owns stock in FOX News
  • 3DogsBa... Jackie ... 2013/12/30 18:41:29
    3DogsBarking
    Because they are a fully owned subsidiary of News Corp. Which means whoever owns News corp. owns Faux News. Sorry you're taking it so hard but a Saudi Prince is pulling the strings at Faux.
  • Mel 3DogsBa... 2013/12/30 21:16:18
    Mel
    Raved and I agree
  • Mel Jackie ... 2013/12/30 21:15:27
    Mel
    Are you suggesting there's not more than one source to this article. There are dozen. This is not stocked. he Paid the Murdochs and Ailes the money to have a significant stake in the company. I never mentioned stock, and neither does the article.
  • 3DogsBarking 2013/12/30 16:22:03
    3DogsBarking
    I wonder why some Saudi Prince who's wealth is derived from depleting fossil fuel would want to own a climate denying propaganda media outlet that bends over backwards to prevent alternatives from coming to market? He must like Jesus or something.
  • granada 3DogsBa... 2013/12/30 17:04:23
    granada
    Al Gorezeera knows it. Qatar's oil money is very green.
  • Mel 3DogsBa... 2013/12/30 21:16:28
    Mel
    Raved and I agree
  • rbeas 2013/12/30 16:15:26
    rbeas
    so what you're saying is both number one and number two owners of Fox news Islamic fascist?
  • Mel rbeas 2013/12/30 21:17:52
    Mel
    I'm not sure of that however, he's quoted as: "A strong American government is not good for us."
  • Mel 2013/12/30 16:01:48

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

News & Politics

2014/09/02 13:43:12

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals