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Marathon Death Generates $1 Million in Donations: Are Marathons Dangerous?

News 2012/04/26 20:00:00
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Claire Squires, a 30-year-old British woman, built a JustGiving donation page when she decided to run the London Marathon. On the page she wrote, "I'm running the london marathon for Samaritans [a suicide prevention helpline] because they continuously support others." But less than a mile from the finish line on Sunday, Squires passed away. Since her untimely death, the page has generated more than $1 million in donations.

Her death has also generated some concern over the safety of running a marathon. Since the London Marathon began in 1981, eleven people have died. However, more than 750,000 people have run in the marathon, meaning the death rate is only a small fraction of a percent -- according to the American College of Cardiology, it's 0.8 per 100,000 people. But still, the fact that anyone is dying from this is bad news. Would you consider marathons "dangerous"?


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  • Ryoka∞Boy 2012/05/24 12:41:07
    No
    Ryoka∞Boy
    11 people in 750,000?Nah Marathons aren't dangerous.Probably those people passed their limits.
  • Royo 2012/05/03 01:22:06
    No
    Royo
    No, they're dangerous when people don't take care of themselves. You need to pace yourself. Are they dangerous? No. Are they challenging? Yes.
  • Boo 2012/04/30 19:38:02
    Yes
    Boo
    Just like anything else people believe is worth doing, it has risks, especially for non-professional athletes. We all have to die from something eventually. Why is it we feel the need to scrutinize anything that poses a risk? Just about everything worth doing has some risk, and someone may die. Death is the natural progression of life, and people will continue to die whether they run marathons or not.
  • taitaFalcon23 2012/04/30 14:50:30
    No
    taitaFalcon23
    the law of averages tell us that it is not dangerous but there are exceptions to every rule and this is no different. BUUUUUTTT.... that said, what part was 'fate' and what part was miscalculation on her part. We don't know. I rode a 'century' once and had a very difficult time finishing the last 13 miles. Actually, I had to stop briefly at about 13 miles from the finish, take a sip of flat pepsi and then rode my bike to the finish line. There are little energy packets or gels that are legal small, light and convenient that might have been of some help to boost the critical blood sugar levels briefly. But the laws of averages say this activity is not especially dangerous for the trained athlete
  • chris 2012/04/30 14:19:41
    No
    chris
    To sit under a tree and be struck my lightning is more dangerous.
  • S.Lewis 2012/04/30 04:06:21
    Yes
    S.Lewis
    Even though you have to train properly people have died. If even one death occurs, it's one death too many.
  • LADY LIBERTY SILLY WORDSMITH 2012/04/30 03:41:28
    No
    LADY LIBERTY SILLY WORDSMITH
    No, if people have training right, then it's not dangerous.
  • Apache 2012/04/30 02:24:29
  • Christopher Kirchen 2012/04/30 01:14:25
    No
    Christopher Kirchen
    +1
    Marathons are only dangerous if a person who gets into it doesn't realize what they're getting into and doesn't properly prepare.
  • les_gvt 2012/04/29 22:46:44
    Yes
    les_gvt
    +2
    yes- if you insist on running in lanes of traffic and don't pay attention to the cars going around you.

    But then again, Claire could have also woken up one morning and fallen and broken her neck getting out of bed or slipped in the shower, or fell down stairs, or hit a power line with a ladder, or.......
  • David 2012/04/29 21:33:57
    No
    David
    Only, if you run them!
  • Kibbles 2012/04/29 19:47:56
    Yes
    Kibbles
    But only if you have health problems, and if you do, why on earth consider a marathon. Also you should be in good condition, one that can handle a marathon.
  • taitaFa... Kibbles 2012/04/30 14:57:22
    taitaFalcon23
    catch-22, by the time you discover your inability to run a marathon - it becomes clear by dying. Overcoming pain and tiredness is part of the sport, because there is no sense of accomplishment that replicates the feeling you get by pushing your body to it's design limits. Hang all the degrees you wish, conquer any financial challenge, date anybody you can and you still won't get that same feeling that makes living worthwhile. Conversely, you don't know your 'condition' until you've pushed it beyond any place you've ever been.
  • Kibbles taitaFa... 2012/04/30 20:38:39
    Kibbles
    Interesting opinion, I find no fault with it. go one.
  • taitaFa... Kibbles 2012/04/30 21:05:48
    taitaFalcon23
    well your point is taken to heart everyday with me... you simply must 'know' your body both for performance and safety. I work on it daily (okay 5 out of 7 days per week - rest and recover are just as important as training. I started at age 53 with a strict 7 day water only fast. Not to lose weight, but to alter my mind. That was 55 lbs ago and 1200 cycling miles. Even athletes are 'eating themselves to death'. We're so sophisticated that we no longer know how to eat properly. The tragedy is that it's far simpler than we suppose. I don't know what killed this runner but somewhere, there was a message she did not pick up. For example - when I train on my bike - I can actually feel the moment of heart blood vessel dilation - that's when my 'real' speed is achievable and my endurance exceeds my own expectations

    First and foremost - understand vitamins to your body are what sparkplugs are to your car. Maybe she concentrated on the cheap easy gain of losing weight and her body rebelled, who can say except that is tragic no matter what the reason.
  • Kibbles taitaFa... 2012/04/30 21:07:05
    Kibbles
    +1
    Agreed, this is a tragic loss of life.
  • Cal 2012/04/29 19:39:36
    Yes
    Cal
    +1
    Easily. I've been in EMS for over 7 years now. I've been at quite a few of these marathons and they are always a high risk for us. We commonly worry about dehydration, overexertion, seizures, and other issues manifesting because of a high stress situation. Also the largest concern is Sudden Cardiac Arrest, which of course can happen to anyone, of any age, and has been made famous by marathons. Of course they are dangerous, but danger has never stopped people before, if that was the case I wouldn't be an EMT - it's a dangerous job in and of itself.
  • bettyboop 2012/04/29 19:26:36
    Yes
    bettyboop
    If your not in shape, don't train and don't hydrate. It's not for the weekend couch potato that's for sure.
  • Rick4Ron - Paul☮2012 2012/04/29 16:56:56
    No
    Rick4Ron - Paul☮2012
    +1
    Life is dangerous! And none of us, will survive.
  • Peon of the Masses 2012/04/29 14:43:10
    Yes
    Peon of the Masses
    It takes the body a year to recover from a marathon, so it's easy to develop some chronic degenerative condition after running a marathon.
  • Boo Peon of... 2012/04/30 19:41:54
    Boo
    +2
    The whole idea of marathons is to push the envelope and do something exceptional, right?
  • Peon of... Boo 2012/04/30 20:24:11
    Peon of the Masses
    +1
    Yeah, it's really all just a test of personal will, and solely for the psychological benefit of the participant.

    If they fail, they can't really be that disappointed, and if they win or even just finish, well they can pat themselves on the back for having the gumption to do so.

    Yet, personally, if I couldn't run to win, then I wouldn't run just to finish.

    It's better to try to dominate over others in competition, and prove a momentary and situaltional superiority to them, than to placate one's own unique patheticness by achieving some personal goal that is nowhere near any real life achievement, and, will in turn, inevitably lead to delusional thinking about one's capabilities.
    But that's an elitist mentality, and in fact, for many, just finishing a marathon is more than anything they might find themselves being put to task to do in their entire lives.
  • Boo Peon of... 2012/04/30 20:28:13
    Boo
    I guess it depends on the individual and their perception of things. :-)
  • Peon of... Boo 2012/04/30 20:55:59
    Peon of the Masses
    +1
    Although I admit to being lax about it these past couple of years, I always figured one should be fit enough for being resilient to whatever life throws at you just short of an unstoppable force of nature, and trained myself accordingly physically and mentally and pushed at the apparent physiological limits of the human body, and sometimes unfortunately, beyond it. The brain and body are "plastic" and in a constant state of growth and change. The potential to improve in skill and ability continues throughout most of our lives. It's something I depend upon. So I hope it is, as well.
  • taitaFa... Peon of... 2012/04/30 21:18:59
    taitaFalcon23
    while I certainly admire your competiveness; my motivation is exactly opposite of yours. I couldn't care less what the person next to me was doing. I love competing with myself. If my participation should coincidentally out- produce yours I would not even notice but then again I don't and have not done organized sports for most of my life. I've ridden centuries bike ( 4: the equivalent of a marathon ea.). I've bonked before and it is not pleasant.
  • seahawk665 2012/04/29 14:07:41
    No
    seahawk665
    If you train for them, then they are safe. Unfortunately, the woman probably had a pre-existing heart problem that nobody picked until it was too late. It happens. That's why everyone doing anything physical like this should get an EKG before they do anything physical.
  • taitaFa... seahawk665 2012/04/30 15:17:40
    taitaFalcon23
    Let me tell you; medicine only has so many definitive answers at any one time. All medicince is based on 'averages' and 'tendencies'. I've recently had tests out the wazoo... and you know what the doctor told me... from his of view I COULD use a loweing of my cholesterol (it was 175 (hdl and ldl with 60mg of hdl). That's it. However, what he did not know was that I had lowered that from 203 just two months before thru exercise and diet (I became a vegetarian biking enthusiast and just recently had a blood test to check for blood sugar level) He recommended that I start taking Lipitor as a life remaining regimen with side affects and budget altering ramifications based on his idea of where he thought my cholesterol level should be.

    His snapshot of my condition was just that, a snapshot that told him nothing of what came before or after. When I said I'd like to get another opinion, he sent an assistant to my room to tell me to find another neurologist. My EKG, MRI, CT scans, blood tests and cartoid sonogram all indicated a patient 20 yrs younger than me and in good health. He only spotted a cholesterol level as something he could possibly point to but could not give a definitive answer to it's affect on my body. I had tingling in my left hand and suggested that he look at sten...
    Let me tell you; medicine only has so many definitive answers at any one time. All medicince is based on 'averages' and 'tendencies'. I've recently had tests out the wazoo... and you know what the doctor told me... from his of view I COULD use a loweing of my cholesterol (it was 175 (hdl and ldl with 60mg of hdl). That's it. However, what he did not know was that I had lowered that from 203 just two months before thru exercise and diet (I became a vegetarian biking enthusiast and just recently had a blood test to check for blood sugar level) He recommended that I start taking Lipitor as a life remaining regimen with side affects and budget altering ramifications based on his idea of where he thought my cholesterol level should be.

    His snapshot of my condition was just that, a snapshot that told him nothing of what came before or after. When I said I'd like to get another opinion, he sent an assistant to my room to tell me to find another neurologist. My EKG, MRI, CT scans, blood tests and cartoid sonogram all indicated a patient 20 yrs younger than me and in good health. He only spotted a cholesterol level as something he could possibly point to but could not give a definitive answer to it's affect on my body. I had tingling in my left hand and suggested that he look at stenosis of the upper vertabrae to see if that was impacting my nervous system (which I also knew because of a neck xray earlier in the year). That is exactly the test he DID NOT run.... Yet, he ruled my condition as 'suspicious' and likely 'stroke prone' - that has an impact on my ability to get life insurance, because of this one doctor.
    (more)
  • bluelady 2012/04/29 13:32:05
    No
    bluelady
    ANYTHING can be done dangerously.... I miss being able to run
  • Ira 2012/04/29 12:54:09
    No
    Ira
    +1
    Breathing is dangerous. Where do you guys come up with this?
  • ehrhornp 2012/04/29 08:28:17
    No
    ehrhornp
    +1
    Doesn't say what she died from. Some people just have a genetic defect which a marathon could aggravate but this is not common. One should be in condition before running it.
  • TheNightFly 2012/04/29 07:50:47 (edited)
    No
    TheNightFly
    +2
    Nobody just passes away at full sprint. She must have had a heart attack or stroke. Too bad nobody was there to provide the immediate medical assistance that might have saved her life. No instead we just say she "passed away". We're so polite.

    Yes, competitive sports are dangerous. Who knew?
  • Odinsown 2012/04/29 06:09:25
    Yes
    Odinsown
    +1
    Running is a sport, sports are dangerous, dangerous does not mean bad.
  • Peon of... Odinsown 2012/04/30 20:27:21
    Peon of the Masses
    They'll figure out a way to create warning labels for it.....
  • Odinsown Peon of... 2012/05/01 01:17:26
    Odinsown
    +1
    On the ribbon at the starting line, "warning: this marathon contains activities known to the state of California to cause death in less than one percent of participants."
  • L1 2012/04/29 04:12:56
    No
    L1
    I am on the fence with some of this. If a person trains and prepares for this, then it shouldn't be dangerous. Hopefully, people also get a checkup from their MD to get a clean bill of health in order to train.
  • addie 2012/04/29 04:03:48
    No
    addie
    +1
    That is like saying flying is dangerous. How many planes crash? I in like a million flights?

    Anyway, If you do not know what you are doing, jogging a couple of miles can be, dangerous.
  • CAPISCE 2012/04/29 03:36:39
    No
    CAPISCE
    +1
    Oh Boy, someone died, better ban Marathons
  • Peon of... CAPISCE 2012/04/30 20:28:49
    Peon of the Masses
    +1
    I agree. Cars too. And bubble gum. And matches. And water. Yes, water. Somebody drowned.
  • CAPISCE Peon of... 2012/05/02 01:51:02
    CAPISCE
    lol
  • Rubyking 2012/04/29 03:05:16
    No
    Rubyking
    fun they are

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