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Is It OK for a Child to Have More Than Two Parents?

Fef 2012/07/03 21:00:00
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California Democrats want to increase the number of parents a child can have. SB 1476 would allow a child to have more than two parents at the same time in order to accommodate same-sex parents, surrogates, assisted reproduction, and other non-traditional parental relationships.

SacBee.com reports: Mom and Dad, same-sex couples or blended families, California law is clear: No more than two legal parents per child. State Sen. Mark Leno is pushing legislation to allow a child to have multiple parents.

"The bill brings California into the 21st century, recognizing that there are more than Ozzie and Harriet families today," Leno said. But some disagree. "It comes as no surprise that he would try to say that a child has more than two parents – that's absurd," said Benjamin Lopez, a legislative analyst for Traditional Values Coalition, a Bible-based civil rights group.

SacBee points out potential problems and complexities caused by SB 1476:
Tax deductions, citizenship, probate, public assistance, school notifications and Social Security rights all can be affected by determinations of parenthood, notes the Association of Certified Family Law Specialists.

Examples of three-parent relationships that could be affected by SB 1476 include: 1) A family in which a man began dating a woman while she was pregnant, then raised that child with her for seven years. The youth also had a parental relationship with the biological father. 2) A same-sex couple who asked a close male friend to help them conceive, then decided that all three would raise the child. 3) A divorce in which a woman and her second husband were the legal parents of a child, but the biological father maintained close ties as well. How do you feel about the proposed bill?

Read More: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/02/4604048/californi...

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  • Cyan9 Herb 2012/07/04 01:00:37
    Cyan9
    +1
    legally being a parent is not the same as biologically. If you disagree, you may want to start advocating to make adoption illegal.
  • Herb Cyan9 2012/07/04 03:06:24
    Herb
    were are talking the word. adoption is not biological, thats more family they techically not parents, a family yes mom and dad yes but the word extends ro biological.
  • Cyan9 Herb 2012/07/04 10:38:13
    Cyan9
    No it doesn't. If you're adopted then whoever adopted you are legally considered your parents. You even get a new birth certificate. I had lived with my Aunt for most of my childhood and she was going to adopt me but didn't because it would have had weird legal implications. Mainly, I would no longer be legally related to anyone on my mother's side of the family.
  • 4gotten Israelite 2012/07/03 21:38:53 (edited)
    No
    4gotten Israelite
    +3
    But only in America aka Sodom and Gamora
  • C4TSMILEY 4gotten... 2012/07/03 23:34:23
    C4TSMILEY
    +1
    It's spelt "Sodom", retard.
  • Torchma... C4TSMILEY 2012/07/04 01:37:39
    Torchmanner ~PWCM~JLA
    +1
    Libtard spell checker?
  • C4TSMILEY Torchma... 2012/07/04 02:59:52
    C4TSMILEY
    Pardon me? I don't understand what you mean.
  • 4gotten... C4TSMILEY 2012/07/04 07:22:57
  • Psyblade 4gotten... 2012/07/04 00:48:29
    Psyblade
    *Sodom
    *Gommorah
  • 4gotten... Psyblade 2012/07/04 07:23:57
    4gotten Israelite
    Everybody know exactly what I mean.
  • C4TSMILEY 4gotten... 2012/07/04 08:29:13
    C4TSMILEY
    "Knows"
    "Everybody knows exactly what I mean."
    Guess who flunked English?
  • samira 2012/07/03 21:32:00
    No
    samira
    +1
    No that weird
  • cali 2012/07/03 21:30:56
  • ☆ Queen... cali 2012/07/04 02:42:53
    ☆ QueenAline
    +2
    so many already are...that's why it's so prevalent today..the whole world is messed up...this doesn't happen in a well balanced society..if there's such a thing
  • ♒ßεllεchεvεllε®♒ 2012/07/03 21:22:18 (edited)
    Yes
    ♒ßεllεchεvεllε®♒
    +8
    Many children have multiple parents and have had multiple parents for decades, centuries, etc.
  • Herb ♒ßεllεc... 2012/07/03 21:56:18
    Herb
    +2
    thats why they are called parents, mom and dad they procreate look at all definitions from many diffrent dictionaries.
    not many parents one set of parents taht brought them into the world you can have step parenst but only one set of parents.
    par·ent/ˈpe(ə)rənt/

    Noun
    A father or mother.

    Verb
    Be or act as a mother or father to (someone).
    Father - origin - mother

    Wikipedia- Dictionary.com- Answers.com- Merriam-Webster
    One who begets, gives birth to, or nurtures and raises a child; a father or mother. 2. An ancestor; a progenitor. 3. An organism that produces or generates ...


    par·ent
       [pair-uhnt, par-] Show IPA

    noun
    1.
    a father or a mother.

    2.
    an ancestor, precursor, or progenitor.

    3.
    a source, origin, or cause.

    4.
    a protector or guardian.

    5.
    Biology . any organism that produces or generates another

    Random House Webster's College Dictionary
    1.
    parent(n.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a father or a mother.

    2.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a source, origin, or cause.

    3.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    any organism that produces another.

    4.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a precursor; progenitor.

    5.
    parent(adj.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    being the original source.

    6.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    pertaining to an organism, cell, or structure that produces another.

    7.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    of or designating a corporation or other enterprise that owns controlling inter...






    <<
    thats why they are called parents, mom and dad they procreate look at all definitions from many diffrent dictionaries.
    not many parents one set of parents taht brought them into the world you can have step parenst but only one set of parents.
    par·ent/ˈpe(ə)rənt/

    Noun
    A father or mother.

    Verb
    Be or act as a mother or father to (someone).
    Father - origin - mother

    Wikipedia- Dictionary.com- Answers.com- Merriam-Webster
    One who begets, gives birth to, or nurtures and raises a child; a father or mother. 2. An ancestor; a progenitor. 3. An organism that produces or generates ...


    par·ent
       [pair-uhnt, par-] Show IPA

    noun
    1.
    a father or a mother.

    2.
    an ancestor, precursor, or progenitor.

    3.
    a source, origin, or cause.

    4.
    a protector or guardian.

    5.
    Biology . any organism that produces or generates another

    Random House Webster's College Dictionary
    1.
    parent(n.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a father or a mother.

    2.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a source, origin, or cause.

    3.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    any organism that produces another.

    4.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a precursor; progenitor.

    5.
    parent(adj.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    being the original source.

    6.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    pertaining to an organism, cell, or structure that produces another.

    7.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    of or designating a corporation or other enterprise that owns controlling interests in one or more subsidiaries.

    8.
    parent(v.t.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    to be or act as parent of.

    Etymology: (1375–1425; late ME (< MF) < L parent-, s. of parēns, n. use of prp. of parere to bring
    (more)
  • ♒ßεllεc... Herb 2012/07/03 23:22:35
    ♒ßεllεchεvεllε®♒
    +2
    well, now we definitely know you are proficient in dictionary copy/paste. isn't there something more important in the world for you to get your undies twisted over?
  • Herb ♒ßεllεc... 2012/07/03 23:25:38
    Herb
    +2
    wanted you to know the def lol, many have no idea what a parent is.
  • ♒ßεllεc... Herb 2012/07/03 23:36:25
    ♒ßεllεchεvεllε®♒
    i dig it.
  • cathy mendoza 2012/07/03 21:21:01
    Yes
    cathy mendoza
    +5
    Nowadays it's impossible for a child not to have extended family--it is up to the biological parents to make the relationship work with the added spouses, partners, whatever-- if they all agree, then the child is the better for it--just ask my grandkids--they've got extended families coming out the gazoo--lol
  • Andrew 2012/07/03 21:16:29
    No
    Andrew
    +4
    A child can only have two parents physically! More insanity from CA! I venture to say there is more intellignece in WV, where everyone seems to wish to denegrate their intelligence than in the whole state of CA! What is really absurd is they will probably pass this stupidity!
  • Constitution Believer 2012/07/03 21:13:25 (edited)
  • Outta' Here. 2012/07/03 21:08:34
  • stevmackey 2012/07/03 21:05:31
    Yes
    stevmackey
    +1
    It is also right for a child to know no parents,
  • Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦ 2012/07/03 19:08:13
    Yes
    Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦
    +6
    For those who stick to two-person parental families, you won't be affected, so don't get yourselves into an uproar. This is a real help for families trying to legally include all of the parental figures of a child. It gives the parents of divorced children continued custody over that child (provided there's no reason they shouldn't) while also allowing new parental figures to step in.

    Hell, MY family could be eligible for this, if we lived in California. My mom, dad, and step-dad are all involved and invested in my upbringing. I consider all of them to be my parents. It'd be really helpful, if something were to happen to me or one or more of my parents.
  • Herb Yuki ~ ... 2012/07/03 21:57:36
    Herb
    +2
    thats why they are called parents, mom and dad they procreate look at all definitions from many diffrent dictionaries.
    not many parents one set of parents taht brought them into the world you can have step parenst but only one set of parents.
    par·ent/ˈpe(ə)rənt/

    Noun
    A father or mother.

    Verb
    Be or act as a mother or father to (someone).
    Father - origin - mother

    Wikipedia- Dictionary.com- Answers.com- Merriam-Webster
    One who begets, gives birth to, or nurtures and raises a child; a father or mother. 2. An ancestor; a progenitor. 3. An organism that produces or generates ...


    par·ent
       [pair-uhnt, par-] Show IPA

    noun
    1.
    a father or a mother.

    2.
    an ancestor, precursor, or progenitor.

    3.
    a source, origin, or cause.

    4.
    a protector or guardian.

    5.
    Biology . any organism that produces or generates another

    Random House Webster's College Dictionary
    1.
    parent(n.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a father or a mother.

    2.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a source, origin, or cause.

    3.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    any organism that produces another.

    4.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a precursor; progenitor.

    5.
    parent(adj.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    being the original source.

    6.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    pertaining to an organism, cell, or structure that produces another.

    7.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    of or designating a corporation or other enterprise that owns controlling inter...






    <<
    thats why they are called parents, mom and dad they procreate look at all definitions from many diffrent dictionaries.
    not many parents one set of parents taht brought them into the world you can have step parenst but only one set of parents.
    par·ent/ˈpe(ə)rənt/

    Noun
    A father or mother.

    Verb
    Be or act as a mother or father to (someone).
    Father - origin - mother

    Wikipedia- Dictionary.com- Answers.com- Merriam-Webster
    One who begets, gives birth to, or nurtures and raises a child; a father or mother. 2. An ancestor; a progenitor. 3. An organism that produces or generates ...


    par·ent
       [pair-uhnt, par-] Show IPA

    noun
    1.
    a father or a mother.

    2.
    an ancestor, precursor, or progenitor.

    3.
    a source, origin, or cause.

    4.
    a protector or guardian.

    5.
    Biology . any organism that produces or generates another

    Random House Webster's College Dictionary
    1.
    parent(n.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a father or a mother.

    2.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a source, origin, or cause.

    3.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    any organism that produces another.

    4.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    a precursor; progenitor.

    5.
    parent(adj.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    being the original source.

    6.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    pertaining to an organism, cell, or structure that produces another.

    7.
    parentˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    of or designating a corporation or other enterprise that owns controlling interests in one or more subsidiaries.

    8.
    parent(v.t.)ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-

    to be or act as parent of.

    Etymology: (1375–1425; late ME (< MF) < L parent-, s. of parēns, n. use of prp. of parere to bring
    (more)
  • Yuki ~ ... Herb 2012/07/03 23:48:14
    Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦
    +1
    "Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents,
    for these only gave life, those the art of living well."
    -Aristotle
  • Adam Yuki ~ ... 2012/07/05 15:41:35
    Adam
    It screws up children so yes I will be in an uproar.
  • darazan Adam 2012/07/06 01:35:27
    darazan
    +1
    Do it doesn't. Does having a step-mom or step-dad screw up children? No, it doesn't. A child will determine parents based on who they feel raised them and are closest to. This is strictly speaking whether or not there should be more than two legal parents, in the eyes of the law. This is not talking about biologically, but only legally in terms of guardianship and responsibility.

    While growing up, I had my mom, and though my mom never dated anyone, I had many "surrogate fathers." These were men that helped to make me who I am today. Men who, though not being related to me in any way, I was close with and looked up to. I wasn't screwed up because of this. I had a perfectly fine childhood and became a decent human being.

    People symbolically adopt others into their families all the time. I don't know anyone who hasn't done this. They have the family they were born into, and the family that they chose. Those closest of friends that they are inexplicably tied to, blood or no blood, and treat like family.
  • Adam darazan 2012/07/06 17:55:04
    Adam
    you should look up statistics on one mother one father for children for life. The fair best under this situation.
  • darazan Adam 2012/07/07 00:54:24
    darazan
    Sure, but that's not reality for a lot of people. Children aren't inherently screwed up just because they live in a home that isn't the traditional kind. Neither does it mean that a traditional household is always going to be the best place for a child. For example: Wouldn't a child be better off in a house, being raised by several people who all love and care for the child and their well-being than in a house with their mother and father who are abusive and negligent?

    I certainly believe that I fared far better being raised by my mom than if I was raised by both my mother and father, since he was nowhere near a decent human being. I think it has much less to do with the household structure itself, and more to do with the kind of people you are dealing with.
  • Adam darazan 2012/07/11 03:45:44
    Adam
    Let me refer you to a new poll of mine.

    http://www.sodahead.com/unite...
  • MorbidCynic 2012/07/03 18:47:30
    No
    MorbidCynic
    +7
    How does the fact it's the 21st century make it ok (rhetorical question)?
  • relic 2012/07/03 18:24:24
    No
    relic
    +9
    California. What more can be said?
  • Striker 2012/07/03 17:40:01
    No
    Striker
    +8
    Ah, Legalizing Insanity. How wonderful /s/
  • Ken 2012/07/03 17:20:48
    No
    Ken
    +11
    The can of worms keeps overflowing.
  • Michael S. 2012/07/03 16:54:16 (edited)
    No
    Michael S.
    +3
    I wish there was a "maybe" option, because forcing a yes/no answer isn't helpful for such a loaded question. I wrote "disapprove," but only because I haven't read SB1476's specifics and decided I approve of them. (The only safe default is "no" when you don't know what you'd otherwise be agreeing to.)



    In principle, I think I agree with the bill's premise. There are a lot of situations in which parental relationships are not clear-cut, and adoption plays a central role in many of those. This is particularly common in the case of a "mostly" absentee biological parent. I tend to think a step-father or step-mother should only be considered a full-blown adoptive parent if their biological analogue is totally out of the picture (which leaves the number at two), but who am I to say what's right for another family? Then there are situations that are even weirder, such as surrogate and biological mothers contracting with each other for equal parental relationships, and the case of open adoptions, etc. In short, my approval of this would really depend on the specifics, and who gets to make the call (all current parents should get a veto over adding another legal parent), and I'd think long and hard about it. :p
  • Yuki ~ ... Michael S. 2012/07/03 19:10:52 (edited)
    Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦
    +3
    "I tend to think a step-father or step-mother should only be considered a full-blown adoptive parent if their biological analogue is totally out of the picture."

    I'd like to disagree. I know my situation isn't the same as everyone else's, but both of my biological parents are still alive, and I have a step-dad. I refer to all of them as my parents. In a country where divorce is rising, and where kids may have two biological parents and a good relationship with them might also end up with a step-parent that they'll also have a good relationship with... the would be really, really good for them.

    I wouldn't agree with adding people wily-nily, but let's face it-- the above scenario isn't uncommon. Billy's parent's divorce, his father remarries. He lives between his mother and father, and has a good relationship with his step-mom, to the point where she is a trusted adult and is invested and involved in his upbringing as though he were her son. This isn't all that uncommon.
  • Michael S. Yuki ~ ... 2012/07/03 19:23:57 (edited)
    Michael S.
    +3
    I mostly agree, and I should be more specific: Legal parenthood implies certain legal rights over a child, and I would personally be a lot more leery about granting those to my hypothetical children's stepmother than I would be about casually considering her to be their mother in day-to-day life.

    As I said before though, "Who am I to say what's right for another family?"
  • Yuki ~ ... Michael S. 2012/07/03 19:36:30
    Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦
    +2
    "Legal parenthood implies certain legal rights over a child."

    Exactly, which is why it should be done with proper consideration. But I don't understand why the majority of voters on here are making such a big stink about it, especially since legal guardianship is really important-- for example, if my a step-parent needed to pick their step-kid up from school during the day in a pinch, and we hadn't remembered to put his name down (or some such) this would grant him the right to pick the kid up from school as his/her legal guardian. ^-^

    It's not for everyone, but for some...

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