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How many days per year does a teacher work?

The Govenor 2011/03/02 03:49:14
The average American worker:
52 weeks x 5 Days/week = 260 Days
4 weeks vacation/year = -16 Days*
10 holidays/year= -10
3 sick days/year= -3
3 personal days/year= -3
Total days worked 228 Days/ year
* 4 weeks vacation AFTER 4-5 years of employment
Work day is 8 hours WORK with 1/2 hr. unpaid lunch and 2/15 minutes break/day

The average teacher:
School year = 180 days
14 Holidays/year= -14
5 personal days/year= -5
7 Sick days/year- -7
? Vacation days/year= ? *
Total days worked 154 Days/ year
*I have heard rumors teachers get vacation time as well but not confirmed
Work day is 7 hours including a 1/2 hour PAID lunch and one hour FREE period/day

Now I know all the teachers are going to cry about ALL the EXTRA time they put in at home and the "continuing" education they have to do.
Here is the solution: Work an 8 hour day with an unpaid lunch like the rest of us and you can get it all done in school! What a novel concept, huh?
You!
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Top Opinion

  • Non-Profit 2012/12/17 16:56:33
    Non-Profit
    +10
    I do appreciate all the teachers explaining how they even feasibly work as hard as most professionals. I have a masters degree, as well as a LCSW. I get paid 40,800 and I am on call twenty four hours a day. Monday through Friday 9-5 if there is no crisis. Typically I have to work 44-46 hours a week on an easy week as I have 15 employees to supervise. As this is a behavioral health field there is most certainly always a crisis. Oh yeah, teachers I also work 52 weeks a year. You claim to not be paid for the summer, by your calculations how much do you deserve to get paid if you worked during the summer? And please stop feeding yourselves the bullcrap that you put in so much extra work. You don't, I know many teachers. Recently during Hurricane Sandy I had to work and go out in the storm as I am a mental health professional while teachers got to sit home and get paid. Quit your griping you are overpaid and underworked. Period.

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  • JC Educator 2014/11/12 01:59:04
    JC Educator
    +1
    Where did you get the data to support these creative "average teacher" workdays? Obviously you never made it through an entire school year at 180 days since you reduced the ADA (all day attendance) to reduce the school year to 154 days. OR...maybe you were teaching the class while all the teachers were taking the extra 26 you created as holidays. The 180-182 days would be a student's calendar. The educator calendar adds 5-7 days. No..no 1/2 paid lunch. No, the school day is 8 plus hours.... without the extra duty schedule. There is no FREE period/day as indicated. And, you get 3/4 of your salary per check as the summer months reserve the 1/4 pay so we are not unemployed. Oh, and we work with idiots like you. Probably not, though.... you were too smart and didn't need an education.
  • Trish Mellott 2014/11/01 14:50:21
    Trish Mellott
    +3
    Where would you be if the teachers in YOUR life had decided that YOU weren't worth their respect??
    Just like you, I work an 8 hour day everyday. I am a professional in my field. I am a teacher. Teachers work as much days as most employees... some school districts, including mine in NC, now require that students attend 185 school days and teachers work 215 days. Of course, the hours that we put in after school and on weekends preparing for lessons, answering emails from parents and others, attending professional development seminars/webinars, and grading papers add many additional work "days" to our schedule. So called "free" periods are used for IEP meetings, department meetings, administration mandated trainings, and parent conferences. Half-hour "paid" lunch time is also not duty free. Elementary teachers sit in the cafeterias to monitor students and other teachers are forced to eat at their cluttered and dirty desks so that they can get work done, Our "free" time is NEVER free and most of the time we are confined to the buildings that we work in from sun-up to sun-down because of the demands to monitor students constantly and get the paperwork done before or after the students leave.
    Why do people feel the need to berate teachers and always investigate how we spend our work...



    Where would you be if the teachers in YOUR life had decided that YOU weren't worth their respect??
    Just like you, I work an 8 hour day everyday. I am a professional in my field. I am a teacher. Teachers work as much days as most employees... some school districts, including mine in NC, now require that students attend 185 school days and teachers work 215 days. Of course, the hours that we put in after school and on weekends preparing for lessons, answering emails from parents and others, attending professional development seminars/webinars, and grading papers add many additional work "days" to our schedule. So called "free" periods are used for IEP meetings, department meetings, administration mandated trainings, and parent conferences. Half-hour "paid" lunch time is also not duty free. Elementary teachers sit in the cafeterias to monitor students and other teachers are forced to eat at their cluttered and dirty desks so that they can get work done, Our "free" time is NEVER free and most of the time we are confined to the buildings that we work in from sun-up to sun-down because of the demands to monitor students constantly and get the paperwork done before or after the students leave.
    Why do people feel the need to berate teachers and always investigate how we spend our working hours, when we are some of the lowest paid public workers in the nation?? Why aren't other professions put through the same scrutiny that teachers are? When was the last time you heard anyone scrutinize the employment benefits and opportunities that other professionals "enjoy" (doctors, lawyers, nurses, managers,business employees, etc. etc. etc)?
    Our 8 hour days are really sometimes 10-12 hour days, just like everyone else's. This has become the reality in the USA. Teachers should be paid the same wage that other educated professionals are paid for our hours of work. However, because we are concerned with the welfare our children and the values of education, we typically settle for less.
    According to the US Labor Statistics Board (http://www.bls.gov/news.rele... "Among the major occupational groups, persons employed full time in management, professional, and related occupations had the highest median weekly earnings—$1,326 for men and $980 for women. Men and women employed in service jobs had much lower earnings, $585 and $467, respectively." Since our pay is that low, most teachers take on second and third jobs and usually always get a summer job.
    Maybe instead of criticizing teachers, our nation should be happy that we continue to work more for less. We deserve and expect the respect for our decision to contribute to the welfare of society
    So please think about this the next time you vote or want to complain about how our nation is losing its values. Public education is a VALUE in our nation and should be one of the first things you consider when casting a vote!
    (more)
  • gwin 2014/10/20 02:00:16
    gwin
    +1
    Be a teacher for a year and you will see what we give up.
  • Kathy Whiteley 2014/10/01 23:38:09
    Kathy Whiteley
    +3
    Is it legal is the state of Texas for a high school teacher to only work from 10 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. everyday?
  • shelly.slader 2014/06/23 22:40:15
  • Jarrod 2014/04/29 15:49:43 (edited)
    Jarrod
    +3
    My wife is a school teacher and has been for 11 years. The reason I even found this thread is because she gives me a hard time for not working very many hours a week. I am a "Full-time" graphic designer for a company that recently started letting us work from home. In all honestly, I may put in around 20 hours per week right now, but I am still a salary employee. She cracks on me all the time for having so much spare time so I decided to work the numbers and see how many hours PER YEAR she puts in.



    I will start this part by letting you know that I have been in one of her classes before, and there is no way in hell I could do her job. It takes a special person to have that kind of patience with children like she does. Plus she is on her feet nearly all day.



    So here are the numbers:



    Her school district contracts for 180 days per school year.

    She is almost never to work on time, lol, so she gets there around 8:00, but she is supposed to be there at 7:45.

    She leaves, depending on the day at 3:30 or 4:30.

    So I broke it down and gave her an average of 9 hours worked per day, times the 180 school days is 1620 hours worked per year. Now of course this can fluctuate some, but for all of those who argue the "work that is done at home"...We have been together for 6 years and I coul...














    My wife is a school teacher and has been for 11 years. The reason I even found this thread is because she gives me a hard time for not working very many hours a week. I am a "Full-time" graphic designer for a company that recently started letting us work from home. In all honestly, I may put in around 20 hours per week right now, but I am still a salary employee. She cracks on me all the time for having so much spare time so I decided to work the numbers and see how many hours PER YEAR she puts in.



    I will start this part by letting you know that I have been in one of her classes before, and there is no way in hell I could do her job. It takes a special person to have that kind of patience with children like she does. Plus she is on her feet nearly all day.



    So here are the numbers:



    Her school district contracts for 180 days per school year.

    She is almost never to work on time, lol, so she gets there around 8:00, but she is supposed to be there at 7:45.

    She leaves, depending on the day at 3:30 or 4:30.

    So I broke it down and gave her an average of 9 hours worked per day, times the 180 school days is 1620 hours worked per year. Now of course this can fluctuate some, but for all of those who argue the "work that is done at home"...We have been together for 6 years and I could probably count on one hand the times my wife has done ANY work at home.



    If you take an average 40 hour work week (which is what I actually had to do before I was able to work from home), times 52 weeks per year is 2080 hours worked per year. That's a difference of 460 hours per year. If you break down the hours she worked per year, into a normal 52 week work schedule, that's only an average of 31.1 hours of work per week.



    My wife's salary is $52,000 per year. So take that and divide it by the number of hours worked and she makes an average of $32.09 per hour.



    Like i said in the beginning, in NO WAY do I think my wife has an easy job. I only did this because of the crap she gives me about only working like 20 hours per week, lol. We are EXTREMELY blessed to both have such amazing jobs. Heck, she makes more money than I do.


    **** And as a side note - for the original posters numbers, I think the 180 day school year is already taking the holidays into account, so you can't subtract those days. Also, my wife doesn't get vacation days. She only gets 10 personal days per year and those can be used for sick time or whatever.
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  • lrudy54 2014/02/13 16:28:50 (edited)
    lrudy54
    +1
    All jobs have their pro's and con's.



    One thing some people fail to realize is that even though teachers have days off for summer break and holidays, these are all UNPAID. Unlike other careers where you get paid vacation days that increase as your tenure increases, teachers never get paid for any of the days they don't work. Any pay checks received by a teacher during the summer is for work they have already done because they have had their pay spread to include the summer months. Also, if school is dismissed for weather related reasons, it has to be made up. It is not an extra day off. During bad weather, if school is out this becomes an unplanned vacation day for teachers for which they cannot plan family activities. And remember, if inclimante weather causes school to be dismissed, it is to insure the safety of students not to give anyone a day off. Most educators do not like 'snow days.'



    As I said, all jobs have their pro's and con's. Most educators don't argue these points because they dislike their jobs, they argue these points to try and educate others on the reality of the profession. It's a hard job, just as other jobs are hard; maybe in a different way, but hard just the same. All professions should be respected for the education and time spent in preparat...
    All jobs have their pro's and con's.



    One thing some people fail to realize is that even though teachers have days off for summer break and holidays, these are all UNPAID. Unlike other careers where you get paid vacation days that increase as your tenure increases, teachers never get paid for any of the days they don't work. Any pay checks received by a teacher during the summer is for work they have already done because they have had their pay spread to include the summer months. Also, if school is dismissed for weather related reasons, it has to be made up. It is not an extra day off. During bad weather, if school is out this becomes an unplanned vacation day for teachers for which they cannot plan family activities. And remember, if inclimante weather causes school to be dismissed, it is to insure the safety of students not to give anyone a day off. Most educators do not like 'snow days.'



    As I said, all jobs have their pro's and con's. Most educators don't argue these points because they dislike their jobs, they argue these points to try and educate others on the reality of the profession. It's a hard job, just as other jobs are hard; maybe in a different way, but hard just the same. All professions should be respected for the education and time spent in preparation to fulfill the requirements of each. I don't know everything there is to know about other professions, therefore, I would be wrong to make ignorant assumptions about how hard someone performs their duties. It's a shame that there is a lack of mutual respect between hard working people.
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  • me 2013/11/23 02:04:13
    me
    +1
    where are you getting your information???? I am a teacher. I typically work 10-11 hours a day at school, and then bring paperwork home. Additionally, I tutor at school on select Saturdays and spend several hours on Sunday preparing lessons and filing other required paperwork. I HAVE NEVER HAD THE SUMMER OFF (nor can I afford to go on an actual vacation...)! Teachers are contractually paid for ten months. Most elect to either teach summer school or work another part time job because we cannot afford to pay the bills otherwise! And even those who are able to take the summer off are planning and attending required professional developments and meetings throughout our "break."
    Also of note, teachers at my school (and likely most everywhere else...) get about twenty minutes for lunch and have one planning block every other day. We rarely get an unencumbered planning block as we have meetings during that time and remediation sessions with students as needed. And if you have personal needs during lunch or planning, like myself, a nursing mother, you must really hustle-- no lunch on most days at all, and on the days that you do, well, you better do it one-handed. We have to monitor hallways and greet our students, so even bathroom breaks are rare. Do you know how many teachers suffer ...




    where are you getting your information???? I am a teacher. I typically work 10-11 hours a day at school, and then bring paperwork home. Additionally, I tutor at school on select Saturdays and spend several hours on Sunday preparing lessons and filing other required paperwork. I HAVE NEVER HAD THE SUMMER OFF (nor can I afford to go on an actual vacation...)! Teachers are contractually paid for ten months. Most elect to either teach summer school or work another part time job because we cannot afford to pay the bills otherwise! And even those who are able to take the summer off are planning and attending required professional developments and meetings throughout our "break."
    Also of note, teachers at my school (and likely most everywhere else...) get about twenty minutes for lunch and have one planning block every other day. We rarely get an unencumbered planning block as we have meetings during that time and remediation sessions with students as needed. And if you have personal needs during lunch or planning, like myself, a nursing mother, you must really hustle-- no lunch on most days at all, and on the days that you do, well, you better do it one-handed. We have to monitor hallways and greet our students, so even bathroom breaks are rare. Do you know how many teachers suffer from kidney stones and bladder issues?
    We are constantly attending meetings before and after school. We are required to take additional classes and build on our degrees-- usually out of our own pockets-- and certainly on our own time-- to keep our licenses only to see our steps increase (teachers don't get raises for our performance... you might get lucky and work in a system where you get a bump up for three or five years experience, maybe even $500 more a year for an additional degree... the inflated teacher salaries that are often quoted reflect the average when including 30 year veteran teachers with advanced degrees...).
    We coach, mentor, and tutor. We are held accountable for the mistakes and apathy of others and rarely get the positive recognition we deserve, but we still keep coming back to make a difference. Getting everything done in eight hours? You have no idea what is required of a teacher these days.
    We pay for supplies out of our own pockets.
    We spend countless and apparently thankless hours away from our own children to help the children of others-- maybe even yours-- achieve and succeed.
    We do it all because we love TO TEACH... so our degrading salaries and constant criticisms shouldn't sting so much... but they are still... offensive, rude, and just plain ignorant.
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  • divamom2 2013/11/15 14:48:33
    divamom2
    +1
    I am a public school teacher and I am at school from 7:30 to 4:30 every day. That so-called Free hour you cited is spent grading papers, subbing for other teachers, doing various duties that need doing, preparing for the next classes, etc. I never spend it relaxing or resting. I do get a 1/2 hour lunch. When there are school holidays, most teachers are at the school doing conferences, or getting additional required training, etc. It is not the cush job you seem to feel that it is. Even in the summers when we aren't being paid, we are required to attend a certain number of hours of training and professional development. Sure, it has its perks like every job. But it isn't a vacation like you think it is.
  • wayne f... divamom2 2013/11/15 14:53:46
    wayne fazio
    how many work days and hours are you contracted to work.
  • carri b... divamom2 2014/09/30 02:45:31
    carri byers
    I have to take exception to the idea that teachers don't get paid during the summer. It may be that your salary is stretched out over a 12 month period, but that is taken into account during your union negotiations and therefore - yes you are getting paid for your summers. The extra time you put in does not mean every teacher does so. I know some teachers whose job starts when they walk in their rooms and who are finished when the bell rings. They get paid the same amount as those who voluntarily put in extra hours. If all the extra time you and other conscientious teachers put in were used to justify higher pay scales, the slackers would benefit too. This is why teacher outcome and progress of students should be a part of pay scale negotiations, but you guys fight that tooth and nail. I just really don't know what you all expect from the tax payer when you are unwilling to prove you are actually doing your jobs!
  • Maria 2013/09/07 16:37:40
    Maria
    +3
    If you actually work an 8 hour day, I'd be surprised. I wonder when you did this post, at home in the evening or on a weekend? Or during "work hours"? Hey, how about this: rather than have our taxes pay for education - I don't have any children and my taxes support the education of your spoiled children who have entitlement issues - you pay teachers minimum wage for your child to go to school. At 7.25 per hour, you'd only be paying $50.75 per day and then we'll use the whole 180 days for school because that's generally how many days the kids HAVE TO BE in school this would then cost you only $9,135 per child. However most states don't pay that much per child per teacher. They do pay more per student but it also covers things like board of education and executive administration, audio/visual, libraries, computers, and other services. If you want any of those things, you'll need to pay extra and hope that other parents in your area pay more too. Oh, and private schools, if you want a non-sectarian one, on average cost $15,945 per this source http://theweek.com/article/in... and by the way, most parents then have to pay extra for other stuff on top of the tuition. If your child is into sports, or music or art, most private schools don't have excellent programs in those. Some do, ...
    If you actually work an 8 hour day, I'd be surprised. I wonder when you did this post, at home in the evening or on a weekend? Or during "work hours"? Hey, how about this: rather than have our taxes pay for education - I don't have any children and my taxes support the education of your spoiled children who have entitlement issues - you pay teachers minimum wage for your child to go to school. At 7.25 per hour, you'd only be paying $50.75 per day and then we'll use the whole 180 days for school because that's generally how many days the kids HAVE TO BE in school this would then cost you only $9,135 per child. However most states don't pay that much per child per teacher. They do pay more per student but it also covers things like board of education and executive administration, audio/visual, libraries, computers, and other services. If you want any of those things, you'll need to pay extra and hope that other parents in your area pay more too. Oh, and private schools, if you want a non-sectarian one, on average cost $15,945 per this source http://theweek.com/article/in... and by the way, most parents then have to pay extra for other stuff on top of the tuition. If your child is into sports, or music or art, most private schools don't have excellent programs in those. Some do, but generally those are the ones at the higher price end. SO, you are so right, those teachers such whiners. Put your money where you say your values are. Pay more for the education of children and less for let's say - prisons.
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  • Jane Nelms 2013/07/31 16:20:32
    Jane Nelms
    +1
    I don't know where these numbers come from, but in my state, teachers do not get paid holidays. We are contracted for 180 days. If it is a non-contact day, teachers are are still in the building doing mandatory inservice trainings. (Mandated by the state, not the teachers). I have 10 personal/sick days per year. Unlike some professions, if I do not use them all (which most of us don't) I will not be able to use them as extra vacation at the end of my career. I can cash them out for all of $20.00 a day. You want me to do my work at school and not take it home? Fine. Instead of answering your child's questions, or being available after hours for extra tutoring, I will give your child assignments he can work on while I grade papers so I don't have to take them home. When your child comes into my room at lunch wanting to make up a test because you let him stay home for his birthday yesterday, I will explain that this is my lunch hour. I am not sure when he will make up the test because my day begins and ends with his, and my planning time is for planning, not teaching. When you want to talk to me about his progress, I will be unable to stay because my work day ends at 3:00. Don't call me at home. Don't expect me to answer your e-mails. Anything I don't get done between 7:00 and 3:00 doesn't happen. Novel concept, huh?
  • Jennifer Jane Nelms 2013/08/30 23:54:23
    Jennifer
    +2
    As in all other professions that schooling is required, you have the right NOT to become a teacher and make such "lousy" pay. I'm sick and tired of teachers unions and teachers crying over "poor pay" and work conditions! Regardless of the normal full time jobs the rest of us work we DO not get every holiday our kids get off and a entire summer and a huge Christmas vacation witch none of us get unless we are lucky enough to have vacation days. If being a teacher is such a HORRIBLE job,do not become one! Simple concept. Or shut your traps and thank god your'e so lucky to have had a college education and a job that doesn't destroy your body by age 40. And did I mention we grunts can get fired if we do do a bad job at our workplace? I feel so bad for teachers and all they do not get. Psh.
  • badwerdz 2013/07/26 15:16:17
    badwerdz
    +1
    Fellow Educators. Please cease to respond to this incongruent argument. You know what you do, you know your real worth, and you know you cannot convince fools of their own foolishness. The math here is beyond inaccurate. The moderator is dismissive of facts and opinions presented by others because they do not agree with his or her own ideas. We have all encountered this disgruntled student. We all know that it takes time and maturity for this student to be able to hold a discussion in a meaningful way. Please do yourselves a favor and invest your time elsewhere. I am proud of the work that you do every day for the children of this great nation. What we have is a profession and we are professionals. Our validation comes from the growth and achievements of our students, their families, and our communities.

    Moderator: If you were in my class, I would teach you how to use data to support an argument. What you have done is used general data that applies to no one in particular, and attempted to apply it to particular circumstances. This is erroneous argumentation at its best. By definition, "average" refers to a median number with values greater and lower than itself but that cannot be applied to all particular instances. In my class, I would have taught you to use specific evide...



    Fellow Educators. Please cease to respond to this incongruent argument. You know what you do, you know your real worth, and you know you cannot convince fools of their own foolishness. The math here is beyond inaccurate. The moderator is dismissive of facts and opinions presented by others because they do not agree with his or her own ideas. We have all encountered this disgruntled student. We all know that it takes time and maturity for this student to be able to hold a discussion in a meaningful way. Please do yourselves a favor and invest your time elsewhere. I am proud of the work that you do every day for the children of this great nation. What we have is a profession and we are professionals. Our validation comes from the growth and achievements of our students, their families, and our communities.

    Moderator: If you were in my class, I would teach you how to use data to support an argument. What you have done is used general data that applies to no one in particular, and attempted to apply it to particular circumstances. This is erroneous argumentation at its best. By definition, "average" refers to a median number with values greater and lower than itself but that cannot be applied to all particular instances. In my class, I would have taught you to use specific evidence for specific circumstances, thereby strengthening your argument and making it less likely that a counterargument would prevail. Another strategy you would have learned, was to validate the counterargument (teachers work more hours than the average, and get paid less) and use its own merits to support your claim, thereby weakening the counter argument. Finally, you would have learned that in a discussion, you discuss ideas and their merits--you do not belittle others as this does nothing to further understanding and reveals your own immaturity, insecurity, and uneasiness with facts and data.

    Thank you.

    PS: I see you edit some comments, why?
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  • badwerdz 2013/07/26 15:02:13
    badwerdz
    The Govenor, do you hate teachers? Yourself? Did you get turned down to be a teacher for whatever reason? Please respond.
  • carri b... badwerdz 2014/09/30 02:53:56
    carri byers
    No one gets turned down to be teachers. They may not cut it in college, but I know some pretty average students who are pretty average teachers who will never get fired for being average because they are protected by the most powerful union in the US. When the WEA starts actually caring more about improving student outcome instead of protecting the middling to really awful teachers from being fired, I think you would find most of us quite supportive of seeing that all teachers get a fair income. I refuse to insist that all teachers should be rewarded for the relative few that really do outstanding jobs.
  • aslkdfj 2013/07/25 17:21:56 (edited)
    aslkdfj
    +2
    You think it is so easy? Then go to college and get a degree to teach. Clearly you have NO idea what you are talking about.The 190 days to not include holidays and teachers only get the same vacation time that the kids do. The one hour "free" period is not free. How do you think lessons are planned? There is no way a good teacher can plan lessons for all classes in one hour per day. Continuing education in the 8+ hours we are at work? With your kid there? Really? Sick days are accrued at about a rate of 1/1.5 months. I got 4/year when I taught. Do I think it is a hard job? Not at all. I liked it very much. However, dealing with jerks who think the way you do can make it miserable.
  • Janet 2013/07/06 15:56:28
    Janet
    +3
    It is mandatory for students to be in school for 180-182 days. Tack on a few orientation and training days and you will discover teachers work 185-188 days per year. Your math is wrong.
  • Jennifer Janet 2013/08/31 00:02:09
    Jennifer
    +3
    Isn't that still about 25 weeks off work a year yet? Totals 177 days off still! That didn't make me feel any sorrier for teachers! More irritated about all the complaining I hear from teachers and teachers unions! WOW! 177 days off a year with full benefits and all the other add ons? 25 FULL weeks off! Stop complaining and do manual labor and you would all shut it and laugh at the rest of us poor saps.
  • aslkdfj Jennifer 2013/10/11 12:37:24
    aslkdfj
    Are you kidding? You are including weekends. There is not a teacher who is off 25 full weeks. You don't even seem to realize that is 6 months. Divide 180 by 5...not 7.
  • aslkdfj Janet 2013/10/11 12:38:06
    aslkdfj
    Teachers in my state work 190 days. Not including continuing ed.
  • Teacher4U 2013/06/28 14:08:21
    Teacher4U
    +1
    "Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put thing in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That ...would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to......... 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and plan-- that equals 6 1/2 hours). Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day...maybe 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations. LET'S SEE.... That's $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is!

    The average teacher's salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1...





    "Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put thing in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That ...would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to......... 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and plan-- that equals 6 1/2 hours). Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day...maybe 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations. LET'S SEE.... That's $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is!

    The average teacher's salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student--a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids!) WHAT A DEAL!!!!

    Heaven forbid we take into account highly qualified teachers or NCLB...

    Make a teacher smile; re-post this to show appreciation all you out there! "

    By Mike Schomer
    (more)
  • SandiS Teacher4U 2014/01/18 01:38:51 (edited)
    SandiS
    +3
    Yes!! Sign me up for this plan. I teach 85 students and have a Master's degree. With your calculations, I'd be making almost $800,000/year. Well said!
  • Teacher4U 2013/06/27 17:39:55 (edited)
    Teacher4U
    To compare a teacher's salary to most other white collar salaries is completely unreasonable. Firstly, we do put in an abundance of extra hours. We come in early and leave late. Do you have to spend hundreds of your own money to decorate your office or cubicle? We do. I am also required to purchase and take care of a class pet. Teachers are able to choose how many months out the year we get paid. Some choose 10 months and others 12. If in fact you do choose the 12 month pay schedule, your pay is adjusted so that you get less each check. And to say you manage 15 employees! That is nothing. Try 25-30 students and their parents. Meanwhile you have to work cohesively with your collegues, administration, and district office personnel. Do you really think our job stops when we get home?! It doesn't. Because so many uninvolved and uneducated people think we are merely babysitters, we too do house calls. I can't tell you how many articles of clothing I have purchased. How many tribunals I have attended, and how many times I had to drive a student home because their parent was busy at that 44-46 hour a week job. Tell me, how did you acquire your skill and knowledge in order to mangage your position? Wait, how did you learn how to study and what to study? The doctors, lawyers,...



    To compare a teacher's salary to most other white collar salaries is completely unreasonable. Firstly, we do put in an abundance of extra hours. We come in early and leave late. Do you have to spend hundreds of your own money to decorate your office or cubicle? We do. I am also required to purchase and take care of a class pet. Teachers are able to choose how many months out the year we get paid. Some choose 10 months and others 12. If in fact you do choose the 12 month pay schedule, your pay is adjusted so that you get less each check. And to say you manage 15 employees! That is nothing. Try 25-30 students and their parents. Meanwhile you have to work cohesively with your collegues, administration, and district office personnel. Do you really think our job stops when we get home?! It doesn't. Because so many uninvolved and uneducated people think we are merely babysitters, we too do house calls. I can't tell you how many articles of clothing I have purchased. How many tribunals I have attended, and how many times I had to drive a student home because their parent was busy at that 44-46 hour a week job. Tell me, how did you acquire your skill and knowledge in order to mangage your position? Wait, how did you learn how to study and what to study? The doctors, lawyers, and other 100K professionals learned their craft from whom? Teachers!!! You may get a christmas bonus that superceeds our yearly increase WITH a master's degree. So many of us moonlight and work in the summer to make ends meet. What is your entry level positon starting salary? Our average starting salary is anywhere from $32,000 - $40,000; depending on what state you live in. This is after you have already spent $45,000 on your bachelors degree.



    Like I said, to compare is ridiculous. If we removed teachers from the equation, where would any of us be? We are needed just like you. Stop trying to minimalize our importance and contribution to this country. No, we don't get paid what we are worth, but we still choose to do it anyway....
    (more)
  • Non-Profit Teacher4U 2014/03/24 12:35:00
    Non-Profit
    I am glad you posted this, this is the perfect opportunity to pick apart your "logic". Ok, what extra hours do you have to put in exactly? Most of your functions are built in to your contract and is also known as YOUR JOB! Yes, I don't spend money decorating an office, I spend hundreds of dollars in non reimbursable gas money driving around the state doing case management. I'm also sorry you have to take care of a big bad classroom pet, that must be hard. It must also be tough "supervising" all of your children and their parents. Do they call you 24 hours a day with actual emergencies? When you do you your documented clinical supervision with them each month? You do house calls but are not mandated to, you only have to allow extra time AT SCHOOL for children to seek extra help. And no you bonehead, experts are taught their craft by other experts who have mastered their trade and teach as an adjunct not a k-12 teacher. Aside from that with all of the testing and curriculum changes in states, the movement is for children to teach themselves in group work rather than a teacher teaching. Teachers are now just facilitators for tests like the NJ ASKS. So you can choose to get paid 12 months and take the summer off and either kick back and do nothing or get another job and make even ...
    I am glad you posted this, this is the perfect opportunity to pick apart your "logic". Ok, what extra hours do you have to put in exactly? Most of your functions are built in to your contract and is also known as YOUR JOB! Yes, I don't spend money decorating an office, I spend hundreds of dollars in non reimbursable gas money driving around the state doing case management. I'm also sorry you have to take care of a big bad classroom pet, that must be hard. It must also be tough "supervising" all of your children and their parents. Do they call you 24 hours a day with actual emergencies? When you do you your documented clinical supervision with them each month? You do house calls but are not mandated to, you only have to allow extra time AT SCHOOL for children to seek extra help. And no you bonehead, experts are taught their craft by other experts who have mastered their trade and teach as an adjunct not a k-12 teacher. Aside from that with all of the testing and curriculum changes in states, the movement is for children to teach themselves in group work rather than a teacher teaching. Teachers are now just facilitators for tests like the NJ ASKS. So you can choose to get paid 12 months and take the summer off and either kick back and do nothing or get another job and make even more money? I am sure most professionals could do that, thanks for proving my point. And you showcase your ignorance as a teacher, a Christmas break? I said I work for a non-profit, do you know what that is? I am sure you do since you teach doctors how to do surgery and lawyers all the information they need to ensure justice is served.
    (more)
  • carlea 2013/05/11 16:06:49
    carlea
    +3
    I have long said teachers complain too much about being overworked and underpaid. This is just a load of crap. They get holidays off, delays or days off because of the weather. Who else has a two hour delay because its too cold or there is too much snow. They have early dismissals. On top of their salary (they get a raise every year which the average American does not see) they have fantastic benefits often times for their entire family, a retirement plan and yet they still complain. They have to do continuing education and that takes time....ok so do doctors lawyers accounts and so many other professionals. Many teachers take days off or are paid by the school district for these requirements.

    They talk about all the extra time they put in and are not paid for it. Many doctors are paid a salary and are on call 24/7 and not paid for the extra time. Lawyers often research their cases on their own time which they are not paid for. Accountants are often expected to work 60-80 hour week during tax season and aren't paid any extra for that. So before teachers start complaining that they are doing more work look at other professions.
  • abi carlea 2013/06/18 05:56:40
    abi
    +3
    Become a teacher then. I can help you in the evenings, weekends and holidays.
  • Jennifer carlea 2013/08/31 00:11:46
    Jennifer
    +3
    You are absolutely right! i think many also take a class on how to make people feel sorry for them for being a teacher as we'll as what is required? And the ones that complain SO much about kids may want to realize what they are really trying to say,"I hate kids"!
  • Beelzebub 2013/04/04 17:06:32
    Beelzebub
    +4
    Bitter much? The number of workdays you have posted is the best case scenario with a school observing all holidays... that's not reality. You seem to not know that "free Period" is a planning period that is often a structured period,.. not free at all,... and not all teachers have them (middle and elementary). You also fail to understand that teachers are required to provide additional instructional time to students as part of their contract and they are required to attend classes to maintain their certification,.. which usually happens in the summer. Sure,.. add it all up and a person with similar education may work more,.. but I bet they get PAID a heck of a lot more as well.
  • carlea Beelzebub 2013/05/11 15:51:21
    carlea
    +1
    i know a lot of teachers that do their education during school not during the summer as you say. and a free period is a free period. many of them go home or do whatever. they are contracted so they get regular raises
  • abi carlea 2013/06/18 06:00:02
    abi
    +4
    You are not allowed to go home, leave school, have a glass of wine or even have a nap!!... After "lunch club", you will mostly be trying to nip to the toilet whilst doing work and eat, but hey, what do I know.
  • aslkdfj carlea 2013/10/11 12:40:06
    aslkdfj
    Which state are you referring to? Sounds like Fantasyland.
  • Pat Bridgewater 2013/03/09 16:38:15
    Pat Bridgewater
    +4
    Before you decide that looking at numbers makes you an expert, SPEND A FEW DAYS TEACHING IN A CLASSROOM -- preferably a middle school or high school class. #1: Teachers are on a salary -- NOT on a per-hour wage -- so that eliminates the "paid lunch." #2: I notice you didn't factor in private sessions with students, recess and lunchroom duties, and the endless hours spent satisfying government requirements. #3. Teachers who teach core curriculum subjects often spend 4 - 6 hours of their PRIVATE time grading student papers -- which explains why teachers are salaried rather than paid by the hour. #4. Most teachers put in at least 8 hours a day at school. #5. KNOW what you're talking about before you speak. Your comments sound like a disgruntled student. #5. I'm not sure of today's salaries, but I do know that 15 years ago in our area a teacher with a master's degree and over 10 years of experience who had two or more children qualified for food stamps. #6, I do know that even today a teacher in the middle of this country makes LESS than a cocktail hostess at a casino!
  • carlea Pat Bri... 2013/05/11 15:52:55
    carlea
    +2
    teachers in my area start at 35K. i know people who work 5-7 days a week 52 weeks a year and don't make that. plus the benefits teachers get. i am guessing you are a teacher.
  • abi carlea 2013/06/18 06:02:56
    abi
    +1
    Great guess. You could be a teacher! And please, tell me where I can make more than the bin men for teaching the future.
  • John Ov... abi 2013/08/13 19:51:01
    John Overman
    +2
    Average salary for a garbage collector is $31,000 (In USD as of Aug 13, 2013 on indeed.com). Average teacher salary on indeed: $53,000. Average teacher compensation (including benefits) is $73,864 nationally (salary.com). I couldn't find benefits for garbage men, but I know they don't get summers off and they have to do the same work per week when there are holidays.

    I'm out of school and still being taught things that aren't true by teachers. Still, they wonder why they're not getting paid more.
  • John Ov... Pat Bri... 2013/08/13 19:29:26
    John Overman
    +2
    Average teacher compensation in Missouri is $60,000 a year (blog post), in Wisconsin it's $88,000 (blog post) a year and nationally it's $73,864 per year (salary.com), vs the casino's cocktail server at $41,240 (salary.com).
  • Andrew the Analyst 2013/03/08 19:30:17
    Andrew the Analyst
    +3
    I did the Math (Thank you Excell)
    Assumptions: Both non-teachers and teachers work an 8 hour day,

    According to the National Center for Education Statisitics http://nces.ed.gov/programs/d...
    The Average Salary for a Public School Teacher 2010-2011 was $56,069

    If the average public school teacher works 154 Days per year that's $45.51 PER HOUR! Plus all those great benefits and tax loop holes. Not to mention tenure!

    If the average teacher works 228 days a year (YEA RIGHT) that's still $30.74 AN HOUR.

    The lesson is...
    Stop telling your kids to be doctors & lawyers. Forget starting your own business! Tell those MBA accountants to ditch the long nights at the office. It doesn't take a PHD in economics to tell you that teachers make way to much. Looks like the best kept career secret is to become a public school teacher... A shame they don't teach that.
  • abi Andrew ... 2013/06/18 06:04:26
    abi
    +2
    The funny thing is, the best thing I have ever taught my children, is to not be a teacher. Bar safe sex.
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