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Have women ever been a part of ancient armies?

Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET 2013/01/24 19:02:50
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This particular person comment seems to think not.


There's a reason no ancient society put women in combat. Not because they weren't as patriotic as men. In fact women are just as patriotic as men and sometimes too much. The reason why soldiers were men is not because they made better soldiers because of their design but because women are the only ones who can have babies It is absurd, no insanity, for a society which wants to continue to put women in combat. All this is is is just a political move and the politicians don't care about those involved. All they care about is staying in power. They are not real leaders because real leaders sacrifice themselves for those they lead. They put those they lead ahead of themselves. They serve those they lead. They don't sacrifice those they lead for a stupid political game."



The Amazons are credited with helping the Trojans against the Greeks in the Trojan War. They are also said to have been fierce women archers who cut off a breast to aid them in shooting, but recent archaeological evidence suggests the Amazons were real, important, powerful, two-breasted, warrior women, possibly from the Steppes.



Tomyris became queen of the Massegetai upon the death of her husband. Cyrus of Persia wanted her kingdom and offered to marry her for it, but she declined, so, of course, they fought each other, instead. Cyrus tricked the section of Tomyris' army led by her son, who was taken prisoner and committed suicide. Then the army of Tomyris ranged itself against the Persians, defeated it, and killed King Cyrus.


Queen Artemisia

Artemisia, queen of Herodotus' homeland of Halicarnassus, gained renown for her brave, manly actions in the Greco-Persian Wars' Battle of Salamis. Artemisia was a member of the Persian Great King Xerxes' multi-national invading force.



Queen Boudicca

When her husband Prasutagus died, Boudicca became queen of the Iceni in Britain. For several months during A.D. 60-61 she led the Iceni in revolt against the Romans in response to their treatment of her and her daughters. She burned three major Roman towns, Londinium (London), Verulamium (St. Albans), and Camulodunum (Colchester). In the end, the Roman military governor Suetonius Paullinus suppressed the revolt. This information comes mainly from Athena Review Vol.1, No.1.




Third century queen of Palmyra (in modern Syria), Zenobia claimed Cleopatra as ancestor. Zenobia started as a regent for her son, but then claimed the throne, defying the Romans, and rode into battle against them. She was eventually defeated by Aurelian and probably taken prisoner.


Queen Samsi


Queen Samsi (Shamsi) of Arabia

In 732 B.C. Samsi rebelled against Assyrian King Tiglath Pileser III (745-727 B.C.) by refusing tribute and perhaps by giving aid to Damascus for an unsuccessful fight against Assyria. The Assyrian king captured her cities; she was forced to flee to the desert. Suffering, she surrendered and was forced to pay tribute to the king. Although an officer of Tiglath Pileser III was stationed at her court, Samsi was allowed to continue to rule. 17 years later, she was still sending tribute to Sargon II.


The Trung Sisters

The Trung Sisters

After two centuries of Chinese rule, the Vietnamese rose up against them under the leadership of two sisters, Trung Trac and Trung Nhi, who gathered an army of 80,000. They trained 36 women to be generals and drove the Chinese out of Viet Nam in A.D. 40. Trung Trac was then named ruler and renamed "Trung Vuong" or "She-king Trung." They continued to fight the Chinese for three years, but eventually, unsuccessful, they committed suicide.

In 937 AD Judith, Queen of the Falash, attacked Axum, sacred capital of Ethiopia killing all the inhabitants including the descendants of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.

axum sacred capital ethiopia killing inhabitants descendants solomon queen shebaThrough the 10th and 11th centuries the Hausa states (modern day Nigeria) were ruled by the Habe warrior queens: Kufuru, Gino, Yakumo, Yakunya, Walzana, Daura, Gamata, Shata, Batatume, Sandamata, Yanbamu, Gizirgizir, Innagari, Jamata, Hamata, Zama and Shawata. Centuries later Amina, daughter of Queen Turunku of the Songhai in mid-Niger ruled the Hausa empire from 1536 to 1573. She extended her nation's boundaries to the Atlantic coast, founded cities and personally led her army of 20,000 soldiers into battle.

Mbande Zinga was the sister and advisor of the king of Ngola (today Angola) and served a his representative in negotiating treaties with the Portuguese. She became queen when her brother died in 1624 and appointed women, including her two sisters Kifunji and Mukumbu, to all government offices. When the Portuguese broke the peace treaty she led her largely female army against them inflicting terrible casualties while also conquering nearby kingdoms in an attempt to build a strong enough confederation to drive the Portuguese out of Africa. She accepted a truce and then agreed to a peace treaty in 1635. She continued to rule her people and lived to be 81. When Angola became an independent nation in 1975 a street in Luanda was named in her honor.

Llinga, a warrior queen of the Congo armed with ax, bow and sword fought the Portuguese in 1640. Women warriors were common in the Congo where the Monomotapa confederacy had standing armies of women.

Kaipkire, warrior leader of the Herero tribe of southwest Africa in the 18th century led her people in battles against British slave traders. There are records of Herero women fighting German soldiers as late as 1919.

Nandi was the warrior mother of Shaka Zulu. She battled slave traders and trained her son to be a warrior. When he became King he established an all-female regiment which often fought in the front lines of his army.

Mantatisi, warrior queen of the baTlokwas in the early 1800s fought to preserve her tribal lands during the wars between Shaka Zulu and Matiwane. She succeeded in protecting the baTlokwas heritage although her son, who became King when she died, was eventually defeated by Mahweshwe. Madame Yoko ruled and led the army of the fourteen tribes of the Kpa Mende Confederacy, the largest tribal group in 19th century Sierra Leone. At that time at least 15% of all the tribes in Sierra Leone were led by women, today approximately 9% have women rulers. Menen Leben Amede was Empress of Ethopia. She commanded her own army and acted as regent for her son Ali Alulus. She was wounded and captured in a battle in 1847 but was ransomed by her son and continued to rule until 1853.



african warrior Majaji

Matriarchal warrior tribes and matrilineal tribal descent are a continuing theme in African history and in some cases survived into modern times. One of the great African warrior queens of the ancient world was Majaji, who led the Lovedu tribe which was part of the Kushite Empire during the Kushite's centuries long war with Rome. The empire ended in 350 AD when the Kushite stronghold of Meroe fell to repeated Roman assaults. Majaji led her warriors in battle armed with a shield and spear and is believed to have died on the walls of Meroe.


The Egyptian warrior queens, descended from the royal house of Kush, included Ahotep, the 7 Cleopatras and Arsinoe II & III. They ruled Egypt and led her army and navy through Roman times. A succession of Ethiopian Queens and military leaders known as Candace were also descended from the Kush. The first Candace, leading an army mounted on war elephants, turned back Alexander's invasion of Ethiopia in 332 BC. In 30 BC Candace Amanirenas defeated an invasion by Patronius, the Roman governor of Egypt and sacked the city of Cyrene.

In 937 AD Judith, Queen of the Falash, attacked Axum, sacred capital of Ethiopia killing all the inhabitants including the descendants of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.

Through the 10th and 11th centuries the Hausa states (modern day Nigeria) were ruled by the Habe warrior queens: Kufuru, Gino, Yakumo, Yakunya, Walzana, Daura, Gamata, Shata, Batatume, Sandamata, Yanbamu, Gizirgizir, Innagari, Jamata, Hamata, Zama and Shawata. Centuries later Amina, daughter of Queen Turunku of the Songhai in mid-Niger ruled the Hausa empire from 1536 to 1573. She extended her nation's boundaries to the Atlantic coast, founded cities and personally led her army of 20,000 soldiers into battle.

Mbande Zinga was the sister and advisor of the king of Ngola (today Angola) and served a his representative in negotiating treaties with the Portuguese. She became queen when her brother died in 1624 and appointed women, including her two sisters Kifunji and Mukumbu, to all government offices. When the Portuguese broke the peace treaty she led her largely female army against them inflicting terrible casualties while also conquering nearby kingdoms in an attempt to build a strong enough confederation to drive the Portuguese out of Africa. She accepted a truce and then agreed to a peace treaty in 1635. She continued to rule her people and lived to be 81. When Angola became an independent nation in 1975 a street in Luanda was named in her honor.

Llinga, a warrior queen of the Congo armed with ax, bow and sword fought the Portuguese in 1640. Women warriors were common in the Congo where the Monomotapa confederacy had standing armies of women.

I could continue, but I'm sure you guys get my point; history is full of amazing women. These women held their own against men and were feared/fierce warriors. It really goes on and on; from the Celtics, to the ancient Samurai female warriors.


In the mid-first century Hau Mu-Lan became one of China's most famous warriors when, disguised as a man, she took her father's place in battle for 12 years. She was celebrated in plays and poems. Her commanding officer was so impressed with her military skills that he offered his daughter in marriage to what he thought to be his greatest male warrior.

Empress Wu Chao, the daughter of a general, ruled China from 605 to 650. For the first 15 years she was the de facto power behind her Emperor husband, after his death she ruled alone. She ended China's long running war with Korea by leading her navy in a decisive victory at sea. She led her army in quelling numerous insurrections and survived several assasination attempts. She was considered by historians to be a ruthless but extremely effective leader of her country who insured decades of peace and prosperity.

ruthless extremely effective leader country insured decades peace prosperity nbspLike their noble European counterparts Japanese women of the samurai caste were expected to protect their family's lands and castles when their male relatives were absent. They were trained in the use of weapons, especially the naginata and knife and taught to train and ride warhorses. In the Kamakura period (1192-1333) clan warfare was so widespread that women frequently took to the battlefield. Itagaki led a charge of 3,000 warriors of the Taira clan against 10,000 Heike soldiers in 1199. In the 12th century Fujinoye, wife of Kajiwara Genda Kagesuya defended Takadachi Castle killing at least two of the attackers in hand to hand combat.

Tamara of Georgia ruled for 24 years and was called "king" by the men she led into battle because she campaigned with them and shared the hardships of an ordinary soldier. Before her death in 1212 she had conquered those parts of Turkey, Persia, Russia and Armenia which bordered Georgia and ended the frequent invasions which had decimated her nation prior to her reign.

In 1600 Shen Yunying, the daughter of a Chinese army captain, took over his command when he was killed in battle. Later by special decree she was made a second captain so that she could legitimately succeed her father and command troops. Approximately 90 years later Chin Liang-Yu fought at her husband's side and after his death continued to lead her army to many victories in a civil war.

Ma Ying Taphan led the all female palace guard in 19th century Siam (now Thailand). Her troops were considered the best trained and most loyal of all the King's soldiers and were never defeated in battle.


Among the ancient Celts women rulers and warriors were so common that when a group of Brigantian captives was brought to Rome in the reign of Claudius they automatically assumed his wife, Agrippina the Younger, was the ruler and ignored the Emperor while making their obeisance to her. In 51 AD the Brigantian Queen, Castimandua, allied herself with Rome as a client state after delivering to the Romans a rebel war-lord she had captured in battle.

Other well-known Celtic warrior queens include Aife of Alba (modern day Scotland) and her contemporaries Mebd of Ireland and Scathach of Skye. In 61 AD Queen Boudicca of the Iceni of Norfolk led a major rebellion against the Romans during which she sacked and burned modern day London and St. Albans.

The first recorded effort to bar women from military participation was a law passed in 590 A.D. at the synod of Druim Ceat. It proved to be unenforceable when the women warriors refused to lay down their arms and comply with it.

Aethelflaed, oldest daughter of Alfred the Great, was considered the chief tactician of her time. She united Mercia, conquered Wales and subdued the Danes becoming the de facto ruler of the Mercians and Danes. She was killed in battle in June 918 AD at Tammorth in Staffordshire.

In 1100 Maude de Valerie, a Welsh revolutionary, raised an army to rebel against the oppressive regime of King John. She was captured on the battlefield and died as his prisoner.

In the 15th century Maire o Ciaragain led Irish clans against the English and was known for her ferocity in battle.

In 1545, Lilliard led the Scots at the Battle of Ancrum in one of their last victories over the English forces. She killed the English commander but lost her own life later in the battle.
Graine Ni Maille (1550-1600) was an Irish princess who commanded a large fleet of war galleys which wreaked havoc on the English navy, shipping and coastal towns.


In 1075 Emma, Countess of Norfolk held Norwich Castle against repeated attack and siege. When it became evident that the castle could not be taken the Countess was offered safe conduct for herself, her troops and her possessions to join her husband who had fled to France. She accepted and relinquished the castle.

conduct troops possessions join husband fled france accepted relinquished castleUrraca, Queen of Aragon became sole ruler of Leon-Castile in 1094 when her husband died. She married Alfonso of Aragon in 1098 and spent the remaining 13 years of her reign at war with him to protect the inheritance rights of her son by her first marriage. Both she and her half-sister Teresa who ruled in Portugal personally led their armies into battle.

In Italy, Alrude, Countess of Bertinoro, led an army to break the siege of Aucona in 1172. She forced the Imperial forces to abandon the siege and engaged in several battles on her return to her castle.

Nicola de la Haye, was the daughter of Baron de la Haye, hereditary castellan of Lincoln. She successfully defended the town against several rebel raids and in 1216 was made sheriff of Lincolnshire.

Jeanne of Navarre (1271-1304) ruler of Navarre, Brie and Champagne and wife of King Philip the Fair of France led her army against that of the Count de Bar when he attempted to rebel against her. Although Philip was entitled by marriage to claim rulership over Jeanne's lands he never did so.

In 1334 Lady Agnes Randolph, wife of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar and March, held the castle of Dunbar against the forces of the Earl of Salisbury for more than 5 months.

During the wars of Brittany in the mid 1300's, several women defended their lands on the battlefield. One of the best known was Jane, Countess of Montfort, who personally led her troops in defeating Charles of Blois at Hennebonne. She later fought a sea battle off the coast of Guernsey. Charles' wife, Jeanne de Penthierre, took to the battlefield to free him after he was taken prisoner by the English. Jeanne de Belleville, whose husband Oliver III of Clisson was beheaded by Charles of Blois, led her troops in sacking several towns loyal to Charles. She later obtained 3 ships from Edward III of England which she used to sink French merchant and military vessels. She kept her two young children with her on her military campaigns until she eventually retired and remarried.

Phillippa of Hainault, queen of Edward III of England, was named regent while he fought the French. In 1346 she led an army of 12,000 soldiers against the invading Scots and captured David Bruce, their king.

Margaret of Denmark (1353-1411) became ruler of Denmark and nominal Queen of Norway on the death of her son Olaf II in 1387. Denmark, Norway and Sweden were at war and Margaret led her armies against key cities and fortresses, eventually forcing the Swedes and Norwegians to withdraw from Denmark. She was elected Queen of Norway in 1388. The following year she was offered the Swedish throne after she defeated the Swedish king and took him prisoner. She persuaded the Diets of the three countries to accept her grand-nephew, Eric of Pomerania, as heir to their thrones. In 1397 she forged the Calmar Union, uniting the three nations under a single monarchy and becoming the most powerful ruler in Scandinavian history.

Jacqueline of Bavaria, Countess of Holland, Hainault and Zealand (1402-1437) became ruler of her lands when her father died on May 13, 1417. Her most powerful vassal, the lord of Arkell, rebelled against the rule of a 15 year old woman and led a revolt to overthrow her, laying siege to the fortified city of Gorkum. Jacqueline led an army of 300 ships and 6,000 knights to relieve Gorkum. She personally led her reserve troops in a charge against the castle gate and defeated Arkell's forces.

In 1429 Isabella of Lorraine led an army to free her husband Rene, Duke of Anjou, who had been imprisoned by the Duke of Burgundy. She later took to the field to fight for Rene's recognition as King of Sicily. Her daughter Margaret of Anjou (1430-1482) married Henry VI of England and defended the Lancastrians during the War of the Roses. Leading her armies she defeated both the Duke of York and the Earl of Warwick. In 1471 she landed at Weymouth expecting to join her forces with those of Jasper Tudor, but his army was delayed and Margaret's greatly outnumbered forces were defeated at Tewkesbury. She fled the battlefield on foot carrying her infant son and eventually escaped with him to Flanders. She raised a new army and returned to England where she fought for a number of years before being captured by the Yorkists, who allowed Louis XI of France to ransom her after obtaining her oath that she would cease fighting.

Isabella I of Castile (1451-1504), wife of Ferdinand of Aragon and queen regent of Spain, who sponsored Columbus' voyage and brought the Inquisition to her country, led her armies into battle early in her reign to protect her succession. Later during the conquest of the Moors, she sometimes rode into battle or mounted sieges with and without Ferdinand, but she was better known as a genius at military tactics and supplying armies in the field.

In 1524 the King of France and the Constable de Bourbon were at war. The King's armies laid siege to Marseilles. Ameliane du Puget, the governor's daughter, led a troop of women who broke the siege. They dug a mined trench known as the Tranchee des Dames which became the modern day Boulevard des Dames. Lady Ann Cummingham led a cavalry troop of men and women in the Battle of Berwick on June 5, 1639.

In 1643 during the English Civil War, Blanche the Countess of Arundel, defended Wardour Castle against a Parliamentarian army while Brilliana the Countess of Harley, who was pregnant at the time, defended Brampton Castle against the King's army.

Non-noble women also fought to protect their homes, towns, cities and countries.

In 1518 in Guienne, France, the Protestant Garrison, a group of 350 girls, were pressed into service to construct and defend fortifications in the wars against the Emperor Maximilian.

In 1568, two sisters, Amaron and Kenau Hasselaar, defended the Dutch city of Haarlem against a Spanish invasion. They organized and led a battalion of 300 women who fought on the walls and outside the gates.

In 1569 Marguerite Delaye lost an arm fighting in the battle which lifted the siege of Montelimar. A one-armed statue of her was erected by the grateful town. In 1584 after the Spanish captured Ghent, Dutch and English volunteers liberated the city. Among them was a captain Mary Ambree who became the subject of a well known English ballad. When P.C. Wren wrote Sowing Glory in 1931, about a woman French Legionnaire who he swore really existed, he called her Mary Ambree to protect her identity.

In the late 18th century Despo Botssi, along with her 11 daughters and granddaughters were among the defenders of the Greek city of Souli. When it was obvious they would be overrun, the women blew up the powder rooms of the Castle of Dimoula killing themselves and the invading army. Lascarina Boubalina commanded four warships which she used to liberate costal towns from the Turks and engage Turkish ships at sea. Her sailors were forbidden to rape women or sack the towns they liberated.

In 1808 an army of 12,000 French soldiers besieged the Spanish city of Saragossa. Augustina, called the "Maid of Saragossa", refused to leave her cannon on the walls and rallied the other defenders. She was later offered both military and civilian honors but merely asked to retain her rank of artillery captain, along with it's pay and benefits and the right to continue to bear arms and wear her uniform. She was written about by Byron and Southey and painted by Goya and Wilkie.

Women Soldiers and Sailors

In 1428 a 16 year old peasant girl named Jehanne la Pucelle convinced the Dauphin of France to put her in charge of his army by promising to reclaim Orleans from the English and have him crowned at Riems. In May 1429 she led the army in the battle that returned Orleans to the French and two months later watched the Dauphin crowned Charles VII of France in the Cathedral of Reims. In May 1430 the girl who became known to the world as Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians during her attack on Compiegne and sold to the English. She was charged in an ecclesiastical court with heresy, blasphemy, idolatry, and sorcery. In May 1431 she was burned at the stake in the market place of Rouen as a relapsed heretic. Her relapse consisted of donning the men's clothing she had worn throughout her career and which she had earlier agreed to abandon in order to save herself from the stake.

mens clothing career earlier agreed abandon order save stake nbspThere are accounts, verified by multiple official sources, of more than 20 women who dressed as men and served in the British Royal Navy or Marines from the late 17th to the early 19th centuries. In 1690 Anne Chamberlyne joined her brother's ship and fought in the battle against the French off Beachy Head. A tablet to her memory was placed in the wall of the Chelsea Old Church, London, along with other Chamberlyne family memorials. The English translation of the original Latin read, "In an adjoining vault lies Anne, the only daughter of Edward Chamberlyne, Doctor of Laws, born in London, the 20th January 1667, who having long declined marriage and aspiring to great achievements unusual to her sex and age, on the 30th June 1690, on board a fireship in man's clothing, as a second Pallas, chaste and fearless fought valiantly six hours against the French ...".

It was also not unusual for the wives of crewmen to live aboard both English and French warships. During battles they would deliver water and carry gun powder from the magazine to the cannons as well as assisting the ships' surgeon.

John Nichols, a seaman aboard the HMS Goliath wrote of the women aboard during the Battle of the Nile on Aug. 1, 1798, "There were some of the women wounded, and one woman belonging to Leith died of her wounds and was buried on a small island in the bay. One woman bore a son in the heat of the action; she belonged to Edinburgh." The names of four of the women aboard the Goliath during the battle were listed in the ship's muster book which stated they were,"victualed at two-thirds allowance in consideration of their assistance in dressing and attending on the wounded, being widows of men slain in the fight with the enemy on the first day of August."

In 1847 the British government decided that Queen Victoria would award a Naval General Service Medal to all living survivors of the major battles fought between 1793 and 1840. Mary Ann Riley and Ann Hopping, who had been aboard the Goliath during the Battle of the Nile, and Jane Townshend, who was aboard the Defiance at Trafalgar in 1805, applied and were originally approved by the Admirals reviewing the claims. They were later refused the medal on the basis that, "There were many women in the fleet equally useful, and it will leave the Army exposed to innumerable applications of the same nature." [Italics in original]. More than 20,000 men received the medal including at least one who was an infant at the time the ship he was on engaged in battle.

Kit Cavanagh, better known as "Mother Ross" was one of several women who served as dragoons in the British Army. She fought during the 1690's at first disguised as a man and later openly as a woman. She was wounded several times but survived and received a military burial when she eventually died of old age. Ann Mills was another British dragoon who fought on the frigate Maidstone in 1740.

Phoebe Hessel's gravestone in Brighton churchyard Sussex, tells of her having, "served for many years as a private Soldier in the 5th Reg't of foot in different parts of Europe and in the year 1745 fought under the command of the Duke of Cumberland at the Battle of Fontenoy where she received a bayonet wound in her arm. Her long life which commenced in the time of Queen Anne extended into the reign of George IV, by whose munificence she received comfort and support in her later years."

Marie Schellinck, a Belgian, fought for France in the Napoleonic Wars. She was wounded at Jemmappes, Austerlitz and Jena. She received the French Legion of Honor and a military pension in 1808. Virginie Ghesquiere who fought under Junot in Portugal and Angelique Brulon were two other women awarded the French Legion of Honor in the 18th century.

Angelique Brulon defended Corsica in seven campaigns between 1792 and 1799. At first she fought disguised as a man, by the time her gender was discovered she had proved so valuable in battle that she was allowed to remain in the military fighting openly as a woman. She commanded male troops at Calvi who later drew up a testimonial which read in part, "We the garrison at Calvi certify that Marie-Angelique Josephine Duchemin Brulon, acting sergeant, commanding the attack on Fort Gesco, fought with us with the courage of a heroine". They went on to commend her skill with a sword and in hand to hand combat. She was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in 1822 and personally presented the French Legion of Honor by Napoleon III.

Margaret Catchpole (1762-1869) was discovered disguised as a sailor on a British warship in 1797. She was sent ashore where she was later arrested for theft and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment. She escaped from her jailer and once again disguised herself as a sailor. She was arrested in 1801 and transported to Australia where she worked as a mid-wife and later became a successful business woman.

In 1807 Napoleon removed the French Legion of Honor from his own chest and awarded it to Ducaud Laborde, who fought openly as a woman with a troop of hussars at the battles of Eylau, Friedland and Waterloo. Although she was wounded at Friedland she continued to fight and captured 6 prisoners. At Waterloo her husband was killed and her military career ended when a cannon ball destroyed her leg.

Elizabeth Hatzler wore the uniform of a French dragoon and fought beside her husband in several battles in 1812. She carried him during the army's retreat after he was wounded in a losing battle against the Cossacks.

Sylvia Mariotti served as a private in the 11th Battalion of the Italian Bersaglieri from 1866 to 1879. She fought the Austrians in the Battle of Custozza.
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  • BlunderWoman ~ FTGOP~ BN 0 2013/01/24 19:26:12 (edited)
    Yes, explain
    BlunderWoman ~ FTGOP~ BN 0
    +19
    I couldn't think of any more "ancient" warrior women, so here is a pirate, Ching Shih, who terrorized the China Sea in the early 19th century. A brilliant Cantonese pirate, she commanded 1800 ships and more than 80,000 pirates — men, women, and even children...the largest pirate fleet in history.



    She challenged the world superpower empires at the time such as the British, Portuguese and the Qing dynasty. Undefeated, she would become one of China and Asia's strongest pirates, and one of world history's most powerful pirates. She was also one of the few pirate captains to retire from piracy.



    The Red Flag Fleet under Ching Shih's rule could not be defeated — not by Qing dynasty Chinese officials, not by the Portuguese navy, not by the British. But in 1810, amnesty was offered to all pirates, and Ching Shih took advantage of it. She ended her career in 1810, accepting an amnesty offer from the Chinese government. She kept her loot, married her lieutenant and adoptive son Cheung Po Tsai, and opened a gambling house

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  • Yes, explain
    ⚥Κόζμω Græme اليا Mongrain
    They've found some warrior women graves in the Steppes as mentioned in the 2nd section from the top in the article above
  • awals 2013/04/24 08:30:04 (edited)
    Yes, explain
    awals
    I don't know any details all I know is that one of the great viking warriors was a woman
  • KCMamabear 2013/04/05 21:04:09
    Yes, explain
    KCMamabear
    About 30,000 - 35,000 years a go, women hunted and fought alongside their men. Religion is what brought the inequality of men and women. Before that, but after the neanderthals, women and men were equal.
  • AngryGabby 2013/02/25 21:42:50
    Yes, explain
    AngryGabby
    +1
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that in ancient Sparta, they taught women how to use a sword so that they'd be able to defend themselves and their families if their husbands were away.

    And then we have the goddess, Athena.

    athena
  • MeiLin 2013/02/05 03:29:37 (edited)
    Yes, explain
    MeiLin
    +2
    Khutulun - great grand-niece of Genghiz Khan, Mongol ruler who established the largest contiguous land empire in world history

    Khutulun (ca. 1260 – ca. 1306), also known as Aiyurug or Khotol Tsagaan, was the the niece of Kublai Khan. Her father was most pleased by her abilities, and she accompanied him on military campaigns. Marco Polo and Rashid al-Din both wrote of her.
    Khutulun was born about 1260. By 1280, her father Kaidu became the most powerful ruler of Central Asia, reigning in the realms from western Mongolia to Oxus, and from the Central Siberian Plateau to India.

    According to Marco Polo, Khutulun was described as being a superb warrior; one who could ride into enemy ranks and snatch a captive as easily as a hawk snatches a chicken. She assisted her father in many battles, particularly against the Yuan Dynasty of her cousin the Great Khan - Kublai (r. 1260-94).

    Khutulun refused to marry unless a man could first defeat her in wrestling. Many men came forward to try, but none succeeded. She would challenge suitors who wanted to marry her to a wrestling match, in which the prospective groom would have to forfeit 100 horses if he lost. She gained 10,000 horses this way. Her parents became anxious for her to marry.

    Finally a very handsome, confident, skillful young prin...







    Khutulun - great grand-niece of Genghiz Khan, Mongol ruler who established the largest contiguous land empire in world history

    Khutulun (ca. 1260 – ca. 1306), also known as Aiyurug or Khotol Tsagaan, was the the niece of Kublai Khan. Her father was most pleased by her abilities, and she accompanied him on military campaigns. Marco Polo and Rashid al-Din both wrote of her.
    Khutulun was born about 1260. By 1280, her father Kaidu became the most powerful ruler of Central Asia, reigning in the realms from western Mongolia to Oxus, and from the Central Siberian Plateau to India.

    According to Marco Polo, Khutulun was described as being a superb warrior; one who could ride into enemy ranks and snatch a captive as easily as a hawk snatches a chicken. She assisted her father in many battles, particularly against the Yuan Dynasty of her cousin the Great Khan - Kublai (r. 1260-94).

    Khutulun refused to marry unless a man could first defeat her in wrestling. Many men came forward to try, but none succeeded. She would challenge suitors who wanted to marry her to a wrestling match, in which the prospective groom would have to forfeit 100 horses if he lost. She gained 10,000 horses this way. Her parents became anxious for her to marry.

    Finally a very handsome, confident, skillful young prince arrived at the court to challenge her. He was so confident of victory that he gambled a thousand horses rather than just the 100 she demanded.

    He bet he could beat her in a wrestling match. The night before the contest, Khutulun's parents implored their daughter to let herself be vanquished. But she would have none of that. She said that if she were vanquished in a fair contest, she would gladly be his wife but otherwise she wouldn't do it.

    So on the day of the wrestling match, the contestants appeared pretty evenly matched. The combatants grappled for quite a time. Then in a sudden movement, she flipped the prince over and won the contest. The prince took off and left the 1000 horses behind.

    The people alleged that she maintained an incestuous relationship with her father and thus would take no other man while he lived. Realizing the price her father paid for such malicious propaganda, Khutulun chose a man from among her father’s followers and married him without wrestling him. Sources vary on her husband's identity. Some chronicles say her husband was a handsome man who failed to assassinate her father and was taken prisoner while others refer to him as Kaidu's companion from the Choros clan. Rashid al-Din wrote that Khutulun fell in love with Ghazan, Mongol ruler in Persia.

    Her father Kaidu increasingly relied on Khutulun for advice as well as for political support. She was unmistakably his favorite child, and according to some accounts, he attempted to name her to be the next khan before his death in 1301. However, his choice was declined due to her male relatives. When Kaidu died, Khutulun guarded his tomb with the assistance of her brother Orus. She was challenged by her other brothers including Chapar and relative Duwa because she resisted their succession. She died in 1306.
    (more)
  • Spizzzo BN-0 2013/01/28 09:05:40
    No, explain
    Spizzzo BN-0
    No, because ancient societies were primative and discrimanatory. We, on the other hand are enlightened and smart enough to find our best warriors, male OR female.
  • Latti I... Spizzzo... 2013/01/28 15:07:49
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +1
    Actually many ancient societies and civilizations did, secondly we are currently still discriminatory.
  • MeiLin Latti I... 2013/02/05 15:14:56
    MeiLin
    +2
    Even though the vast majority of all combatants have been men in every culture, Women in the military have a history that extends over 4,000 years into the past, throughout a large number of cultures and nations. Women have played many roles in the military, from ancient warrior women, to the women currently serving in conflicts,
  • ur XLNC-PWCM 2013/01/26 17:20:10
    Yes, explain
    ur XLNC-PWCM
    +1
    Let's keep it simple. Amazon's! This guys reasoning is a bit off. When it came to villages being raided and pillaged, it seems reasonable that the women would not just stand there meekly awaiting the outcome. Again, the argument is STILL about ability and desire. Then it was a matter of mutual survival and EVERYDAY existence. We do, today have women that will accept meekly whatever comes to pass.......but we ALL know NOT to get between a concerned mother and her 'cubs'! The body-bag argument doesn't wash. A body-bag with contents is NOT desirable......male OR female!
  • Chibi Guru Z 2013/01/25 22:28:56
    Yes, explain
    Chibi Guru Z
    +2
    Great post. I actually knew some of this stuff. I learned a few new things too. Excellent!
  • Latti I... Chibi G... 2013/01/26 02:05:38
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +2
    Thabnk you Chibi.
  • MeiLin Latti I... 2013/02/05 16:08:33 (edited)
    MeiLin
    +1
    Kenau Simonsdochter Hasselaer (1526–1588) was a wood merchant of Haarlem, who became a legendary folk hero for her fearless defense of the city against the Spanish invaders during the siege of Haarlem in 1573. She was the daughter of Simon Hasselaer and Grietje Koen.

    16th century portrait of a woman from the Hasselaer family, assumed to be Kenau, and used in the 18th century as a basis for an engraving by Reinier Vinkeles

    The English translation is a bowdlerization of the original Dutch text and a good example of how information gets filtered. She is not a legend, she really did exist and she really was instrumental in organizing the successful defense of the city walls against Spanish attack. She and other women and children really did pour vats of boiling tar over the walls on the enemy....

    In the English version she's a 'wood merchant', in the Dutch version, she's a
    "ship-builder and a wood-merchant" and her father is the mayor of Haarlem during
    the 80-years war with the Spanish. Her cousin was a messenger for prince William of Orange, her brother-in-law, Hadrianus Junius was William of Oranje-Nassau's personal physician and during the "siege of Haarlem", she supplied the wood for the necessary ships.
    The Dutch colonial empire was built on ships, so a ''ship-builder and wood...















    Kenau Simonsdochter Hasselaer (1526–1588) was a wood merchant of Haarlem, who became a legendary folk hero for her fearless defense of the city against the Spanish invaders during the siege of Haarlem in 1573. She was the daughter of Simon Hasselaer and Grietje Koen.
    spanish invaders siege haarlem 1573 daughter simon hasselaer grietje koen
    16th century portrait of a woman from the Hasselaer family, assumed to be Kenau, and used in the 18th century as a basis for an engraving by Reinier Vinkeles

    The English translation is a bowdlerization of the original Dutch text and a good example of how information gets filtered. She is not a legend, she really did exist and she really was instrumental in organizing the successful defense of the city walls against Spanish attack. She and other women and children really did pour vats of boiling tar over the walls on the enemy....

    In the English version she's a 'wood merchant', in the Dutch version, she's a
    "ship-builder and a wood-merchant" and her father is the mayor of Haarlem during
    the 80-years war with the Spanish. Her cousin was a messenger for prince William of Orange, her brother-in-law, Hadrianus Junius was William of Oranje-Nassau's personal physician and during the "siege of Haarlem", she supplied the wood for the necessary ships.
    The Dutch colonial empire was built on ships, so a ''ship-builder and wood-merchant' really is more important than the Wiki editor assumed was proper for a female, I guess...
    A LOT got lost in the translation.. and all of it had to do with power
    Despite eye-witness accounts from German mercenaries that she actively fought
    at the head of a group of 300 women that kept the enemy away from the city walls
    with boiling water, burning straw and hot tar...and other evidence, a historical revision took place in the 1870's when the extent of her contribution was called into question and derided as being impossible for the feminine brain

    Kenau Simonsdochter Hasselaer (1526-1588/1589) een scheepsbouwer en houthandelaar die vooral bekend is geworden door haar felle verzet bij de verdediging van Haarlem tijdens de Tachtigjarige Oorlog.
    Toen Kenau geboren werd, was haar vader, Simon Gerritszoon Brouwer, burgemeester van Haarlem. Haar zwager was Hadrianus Junius, de lijfarts van Willem van Oranje. Tijdens het 'Beleg van Haarlem' leverde ze scheepshout voor schepen die via het Haarlemmermeer in verbinding stonden met de Prins. Haar neef Pieter Hasselaer diende als boodschapper voor de prins.

    Volgens sommige ooggetuigenverslagen van Duitse huursoldaten vocht ze zelf actief mee tegen de Spanjaarden. Zo zou ze aan het hoofd staan van 300 vrouwen die met kokend water, brandend stro en gesmolten pek vanaf de stadsmuren de vijand van zich afhield. Hooft schijnt soortgelijke verhalen hierover gebaseerd te hebben op gesprekken met haar neef, Pieter Dirksz. Hasselaer. Volgens Hooft was ze niet bang om met spies, geweer en degen tegen de vijand te strijden. De vrouwen vochten volgens hem actief mee omdat ze wisten hoe de Spanjaarden waren omgegaan met de vrouwen in andere veroverde steden. Hierdoor is de mythe om haar persoon ontstaan

    Centuries later the name "Kenau" in Dutch is now just another word for,
    what else, ... "Bitch".

    steden hierdoor mythe om haar persoon ontstaan kenau dutch bitch

    ksn
    (more)
  • Broken 2013/01/25 21:42:45
    No, explain
    Broken
    Joan of Arc is the Only example I know of where a woman inspired, led and engaged in the fighting. Having women in the fighting ranks was not at all a common practice.
  • Latti I... Broken 2013/01/26 02:06:01
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +1
    If you read the post, you would have known that to be a fallacy.
  • MeiLin Latti I... 2013/02/05 03:50:12 (edited)
    MeiLin
    +1
    War is for boys and girls can't have any!
  • mk, Smartass Oracle 2013/01/25 20:37:38
  • William 2013/01/25 19:14:35
    Yes, explain
    William
    +2
    In Judges Chapter 4 of the Bible, Deborah, the prophetess leads the Israeli army against Sisera, General of the Canaanite army.
  • JonDeniro 2013/01/25 19:13:50
    Yes, explain
    JonDeniro
    +2
    Ever heard of Amazons?
  • Cliff 2013/01/25 11:32:51
    Yes, explain
    Cliff
  • ZERO Cliff 2013/01/25 20:33:03
  • Latti I... ZERO 2013/01/25 20:58:40
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +1
    All of the factual information is in the post; there were plenty of women who fought in battle. Cultures have always change in their perception of what women can or can't do. Where as there were societies that consider their women fierce warriors/lovers, there were also societies that claim they were dainty creatures of fragility.

    It's quite pathetic that in 2013, and despite all of the facts/historical reference of women being good at combat, we are yet again doubting. Maybe this is why our country is lagging so much in education.
  • ZERO Latti I... 2013/01/25 21:08:46
    ZERO
    In order to replace the existing population, each woman needs to have an average of 2.11 children. Historically, military leaders have recognized that it is in society's best interest to keep women as safe as possible.

    That's not to say that no woman has ever commanded an army, but they have never been rank and file soldiers except in the rarest of examples. Sexism has nothing to do with it, it's just the cold calculations of the military mind.
  • Mark 2013/01/25 08:28:24
    Yes, explain
    Mark
    +2
    If anything, these facts refute the feminist mantra that women were always property. Celtic women had equal rights.

    Even though women can fight, doesn't mean they will do it better than men. I support women in the military. But when push comes to shove, I doubt most women could carry my 6'7" 185lb body to safety if I were injured. You want to fight with men, you must pass the same physical agility tests.
  • Tastentier 2013/01/25 08:02:56 (edited)
    Yes, explain
    Tastentier
    +3
    "The reason why soldiers were men is not because they made better soldiers because of their design..."

    Actually, I'm pretty sure that this was one important reason. On the whole, men are not only physically stronger (or rather, able to develop greater strength through exercise), but also naturally geared towards more aggressive and confrontational behavior, even as children.

    One might argue that if it wasn't for men, soldiers would never have been necessary in the first place :-) Anyway, modern weapon technology is a great equalizer and minimizes the male advantage in this field.

    Edited to add: Looking at your examples, I think it is important to make a distinction between soldiers and military commanders. There were many female leaders in human history, and many of them led troops into war (so much for the historical revisionism of many feminist authors). But that's not the same as fighting on the front lines. Cultures where women fought alongside men in battle are few and far between.
  • MeiLin Tastentier 2013/02/06 14:37:38 (edited)
    MeiLin
    +1
    Great post, Tastentier and good to highlight the "distinction between soldiers and military commanders. There were many female leaders" indeed,
    But! imho, soldiers, only follow other soldiers..
    a willingness to personally lead an attack is probably one characteristic
    of a general. A female general has to be not just as good, she usually has
    to be better than her male counter-part.

    A Dutch proverb says : The one who is not strong, must be clever....

    Sun Tzu says, and I know you know...
    The best generals win the war before
    a single battle has been fought....

    at that level of warcraft. physical strength seems to be of secondary consideration.
  • ZERO 2013/01/25 07:19:18
    No, explain
    ZERO
    +1
    Historically, most cultures have placed too much value on women to allow them to be wasted in combat.
  • Cat 2013/01/25 06:18:58
    Yes, explain
    Cat
    +1
    Rarely, but early Briton tribes had female warriors like Queen Boudicca of the Isini who fought the Romans, and the famous Amazons of ancient Crimea. Though possibly only legend, the Valkyries of ancient Germany are an accepted tradition.
  • marty 2013/01/25 04:14:38
    Yes, explain
    marty
    +3
    Probably quite common; only the last millennium in Europe were women taught to avoid the battlefield. Likely due to religious dogma and a way to "civilize" war.
  • Gid 2013/01/25 03:51:05
    Yes, explain
    Gid
    +2
    I believe so, but they would be the exception not the rule.
  • Latti I... Gid 2013/01/25 03:57:27
    Latti Ice Ganga Gangsta of PHAET
    +3
    They were not the exception to the norm in "Many" cases and "Societies".
  • Mog of War 2013/01/25 01:42:22
    Yes, explain
    Mog of War
    +2
    China's Employed Women in every era of their history except for the Ming Dynasty which is far from Ancient. Archeological evidence suggests the Amazons actually existed.

    In Medieval Europe, greensleeves were women who serviced the men of armies in various ways, acting as supply lines, messengers, cooks, field nurses.They made arrangements at inns and farmsteads for lodging and supplies, and some would bear the men's sexual urges as well, so they would be more focused on winning the battle and less focused on raping and pillaging. They often fought along side their armies. In many nations' versions, only the greensleeves who actually fought would have sex with the soldiers. They were not seen as harlots for doing so, but that also meant there was a powerful commitment. For a greensleeve to make love to a soldier who was not her husband was seen as a commitment to do in kind for his comrades and to bear arms with them. This meant if there was a girl a soldier fancied for himself, he'd still marry her rather than take her into his unit. And wives among them were expected to keep faithful to their husbands and their husbands dare not cheat on them. And while having sex with a soldier was seen as a commitment to bear arms with the soldiers, bearing arms with the soldiers was NOT ...
    China's Employed Women in every era of their history except for the Ming Dynasty which is far from Ancient. Archeological evidence suggests the Amazons actually existed.

    In Medieval Europe, greensleeves were women who serviced the men of armies in various ways, acting as supply lines, messengers, cooks, field nurses.They made arrangements at inns and farmsteads for lodging and supplies, and some would bear the men's sexual urges as well, so they would be more focused on winning the battle and less focused on raping and pillaging. They often fought along side their armies. In many nations' versions, only the greensleeves who actually fought would have sex with the soldiers. They were not seen as harlots for doing so, but that also meant there was a powerful commitment. For a greensleeve to make love to a soldier who was not her husband was seen as a commitment to do in kind for his comrades and to bear arms with them. This meant if there was a girl a soldier fancied for himself, he'd still marry her rather than take her into his unit. And wives among them were expected to keep faithful to their husbands and their husbands dare not cheat on them. And while having sex with a soldier was seen as a commitment to bear arms with the soldiers, bearing arms with the soldiers was NOT seen as a commitment to have sex with them. I don't believe the Church approved of the practice. A myriad of verses were sung to these shield maidens, but the church commissioned many religious songs and boring historical narratives to their ubiquitous tune, which were implemented in children's rote learning, in what may have been an attempt to delete these verses from the culture. Most of the verses were forgotten. The practice was gradually curtailed and abandoned. But green sleeves and golden ribbons would be used to signify a husband or lover in the armed forces for subsequent centuries to this date. And kings and popes codified Chivalry in letters, but it was the Greensleeves who essentially enforced it.
    (more)
  • MeiLin Mog of War 2013/02/06 18:32:53
  • michael 2013/01/25 01:35:01
    Yes, explain
    michael
    +4
    Irish Queen Maeve queen maeve
  • Ishmael 2013/01/25 01:15:16
    Yes, explain
    Ishmael
    +3
    Lest we forget. There were these two women air Aces flying for the Soviet Air Force in World War 2.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
  • Darnel 2013/01/25 01:12:35
    Yes, explain
    Darnel
    +3
    Don't have to explain,.. we have pages already covered here by others.
  • Beccy 2013/01/25 01:09:17
    Yes, explain
    Beccy
    But aside for these acceptions most societies protect women children and the elderly.
  • Maria 2013/01/25 00:56:46
    Yes, explain
    Maria
    +3
    1)Fu Hao was one of the many wives of King Wu Ding of the Shang Dynasty and, unusually for that time, also served as a military general and high priestess.
    2)The daughter of a Duke, Princess Pingyang raised and commanded her own army in the revolt against the Sui Dynasty. Later, her father would become Emperor Gaozu.
    3)With regard to Native American history, the majority of Native American tribes possessed respected and well established women leaders of their "militia". These female leaders determined the fate of prisoners of war among other tribal decisions. However, the Europeans and early American men refused to deal with Native American women on such matters and so their significance was not understood or appreciated until relatively recently.
    4)In South Asia and the Indian Subcontinent, the concept of a "woman warrior" exists both in mythology and in history, and there are records of women who have led armies into battle. Rani Lakshmibai of Jhansi was one of the leading figures of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and was described by the British as "remarkable for her beauty, cleverness and perseverance", and that she had been "the most dangerous of all the rebel leaders".
  • MeiLin Maria 2013/02/05 15:16:14
    MeiLin
    +1
    Wow, thank you! I will go and find more, Love It!
  • Maria MeiLin 2013/02/05 18:43:38
    Maria
    +2
    You're certainly welcome)
  • ««Gingey, the Master Debate... 2013/01/25 00:54:41
    Yes, explain
    ««Gingey, the Master Debater of Þ|-|Дэ†»»
    +4
    What an amazing, well-put post. Everyone on sodahead needs to see this.

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