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Has the War on Drugs FAILED??!!

BlueRepublican 2012/04/14 16:26:56
Yes, it is a failed policy
No, we are winning the War on Drugs
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It was in 1971 that President Nixon coined the phrase "War on Drugs" to combat America's apetite for consumption. Two years later the DEA was formed to enforce laws passed prohibiting certain drugs.

Alcohol Prohibition was passed in 1919 before and was repealed in 1933 after its overwhelming failure. Prohibition bred organized crime, gangs, civilian criminality, use, and the lives lost trying to keep America "DRY."

Today, supporters of this policy claim that it is a success as proven by the many documented seizures and raids. Over the years many high-level cartel members and drug-traffickers have been arrested. Many also claim that the "War on Drugs" keeps us safer than before the policy took effect.

On the other hand, opponents of the policy claim it to be a failure. They cite our previous experience with prohibition and claim that the "War" itself causes more harm than good. For example, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world and a large percentage is due to drug offenses. Second, drug sales actually fund terrorism, street gang violence, drug cartels and corruption.
Finally, legal drugs such as alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs kill more people every year than all other illegal drugs combined.

While policy czars in Washington, big govt departments, prison industry, etc.. lobby to expand funding and increase laws and penalties. Medical professionals, local law enforcement and others advocate for treatment of drug abuse as a medical issue instead of a criminal justice issue.

So with more drugs coming in than ever before, and after BILLIONS of dollars spent combatting a societal ill, and thousands of law enforcement lives lost (DEA, police, border patrol, etc...) many Americans are asking...


Has the War on Drugs FAILED??!!


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  • luvguins 2012/04/14 16:41:44
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    luvguins
    +15
    Yes, an abysmal failure in cost, and the millions imprisoned for the victimless crime of just using. Also enriching criminals who kill to maintain their status quo. Just legalizing marijuana would save billions.

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  • Tinka123 Beccy 2012/04/14 23:01:04 (edited)
    Tinka123
    +1
    I agree, the best way to limit drug consumption is through proper education on the facts. But we will never kill the market for drugs, we can only make it less violent. Which is part of why we should legalize them - in my opinion.
  • Beccy Tinka123 2012/04/14 23:08:39
    Beccy
    +1
    I agree
  • jr 2012/04/14 19:50:00
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    jr
    Would be better to legalize, tax, and earmark the money for rehab. Attempting to stand in the way of people learning lessons in life is just making the situation much worse
  • Yes, it is a failed policy
    ☆The Rock☆ * AFCL* The Sheriff!!
  • Mr. Smith 2012/04/14 19:29:41
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    Mr. Smith
    +5
    Putting people in jail who committed a victimless crime is a waste of tax dollars and public resources - and they even failed at doing that!
  • A Founding Father 2012/04/14 19:28:46
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    A Founding Father
    It is a totally failed policy, as no one but a few local authorities really cares to see it succeed. About 25% of American citizens are drug users and many of them, particularly the least educated and unemployed, spend every dollar they can get their hands on to buy some form of illegal chemical off the street. The river of money flowing southward across the open borders is too large to even estimate. much less count.

    The "judicial system" is a great supporter of allowing this absurdity to continue. There would be widespread unemployment there if the drugs were stopped. Consider how many judges, police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, prisons, correctional officers, prison guards, cooks, plumbers, drivers, court employees, janitors and bailiffs in the courts, computer programmers, clerks, nurses, Doctors, parole officers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and others, owe their jobs to the volume of druggies passing through this "system" that is an endless river of broken lives and destroyed health.

    Then, of course, the money finds it's way into the accounts and PACs of elected officials at every level, from the local school board candidate and Sheriff, to the White House and Congress, and into the Court system at all levels. Several retired FBI agents and officers from th...








    It is a totally failed policy, as no one but a few local authorities really cares to see it succeed. About 25% of American citizens are drug users and many of them, particularly the least educated and unemployed, spend every dollar they can get their hands on to buy some form of illegal chemical off the street. The river of money flowing southward across the open borders is too large to even estimate. much less count.

    The "judicial system" is a great supporter of allowing this absurdity to continue. There would be widespread unemployment there if the drugs were stopped. Consider how many judges, police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, prisons, correctional officers, prison guards, cooks, plumbers, drivers, court employees, janitors and bailiffs in the courts, computer programmers, clerks, nurses, Doctors, parole officers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and others, owe their jobs to the volume of druggies passing through this "system" that is an endless river of broken lives and destroyed health.

    Then, of course, the money finds it's way into the accounts and PACs of elected officials at every level, from the local school board candidate and Sheriff, to the White House and Congress, and into the Court system at all levels. Several retired FBI agents and officers from the DEA have written books and circulate the country giving speeches, telling of how
    their work was blocked and diverted to be essentially useless.

    For those who are old enough to recall, or have a grasp of such history, the experience of the Chinese Communist entry into China is a lesson of value. In the period of WWII and immediately thereafter, communist operatives flooded China with Opium, making "dens" where workers were invited and provided with the drug for practically nothing. Eventually, the economy degenerated into confusion and unable to produce much of anything, which led to a revolution that brought the Communists to power. Immediately, they made the posession or use of drugs such as Opium punishable in the most violent manner, including death sentences for selling or distributing. And, of course, they closed the "dens" and stopped growing the poppies and distributing. Within a few months the problem was over and done with, and the economy recovered dramatically, for which the Communist Party claimed to be evidence of their superior programs.

    If you don't grasp the relationship of China's experience to that we face today, you are making intentional denial of how the world works. Afghanistan, for instance, is the world's largest supplier of Opium, and Mendocino County, California, produces a $Billion crop of marijuana each year, which is spreading southward down the coastal mountains clear to San Diego County. Across the southern border the traffic is so intense that 747s unload at public airports across the country, known to DEA, but prevented from intercepting the cargoes, usually by a directive from the top level of management to "study the problem", often for ten years or more. Obviously, there is no willingness to stop the flow of drugs as our economy is trashed and millions of "unemployed" and welfare cases are created by this travesty.

    If you want to see recovery of the economy and a great reduction in the numbers of unemployed and welfare cases, put an end to this root cause of undereducation, sloth,
    and wasted money, including the tens of millions of visits each year to emergency rooms
    by these users and their families. This absurdity is among the greatest wastes of resources in our economy.
    (more)
  • Savior 2012/04/14 19:19:03
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    Savior
    The whole war on drugs is actually a war on a free society, not saying in a free society everyone will be doing drugs. I personally disagree with drug use, but I disagree more with prohibition of drugs.

    Here's what happens.

    The drugs are made illegal, which means who's selling it: criminals, criminals who will do anything to keep their business going, even crimes worse than drug use. As long as their is demand for the product, people will make sure there is supply.

    Which means the people selling the drugs are getting richer, while the government spends billions doing what.

    First they spend money on hiring the people who are supposed to keep it out, but then those people can also make money allowing it in. So the people who are supposed to be protecting us from it can be easily compromised, and who is the victim. The taxpayer who is paying to protect us from it.

    Lastly whenever they do catch criminals, they put them in jail. Which means the prison population increases. Which means more expenses for the taxpayer.

    So who is the victim in the war on drugs? The taxpayer because they are paying to keep it off the streets, which will only happen until the individuals perception changes, laws- good people don't need them, bad people don't follow them. Then the taxpayer also pays to keep the users in jail.
  • Reggie☮ 2012/04/14 19:12:16
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    Reggie☮
    +1
    Obviously.
  • Uranos7 2012/04/14 19:02:45 (edited)
    Other, please leave a comment
    Uranos7
    +1
    Yes and No.
    In the Reagan / Bush era we were making progress but since Clinton it has really slipped and lost focus.
    In my opinion we should legalize, regulate, and tax marijuana and use the money saved and proceeds from the taxes to combat the killer drugs such as crack, heroin, and cocaine that are killing Americans.

    Why $42 billion? Because that's what our current marijuana laws cost American taxpayers each year, according to a new study by researcher Jon Gettman, Ph.D. -- $10.7 billion in direct law enforcement costs, and $31.1 billion in lost tax revenues. And that may be an underestimate, at least on the law enforcement side, since Gettman made his calculations before the FBI released its latest arrest statistics in late September. The new FBI stats show an all-time record 829,627 marijuana arrests in 2006, 43,000 more than in 2005.

    42 billion is more than the 38 billion in tax cuts the congress is so proud of.
  • Richard... Uranos7 2012/04/14 19:16:50
    Richard Hungwell AKA Relentless
    Thats one point of view, I'm not sure I agree with it 100%, but it is certainly a whole lot better than what we have now.
  • dallas 2012/04/14 18:59:35
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/14 19:59:18
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    +1
    Legalize ALL drugs? Marijuana is fine with me but anything else will just bring on more drug addict entitlement recipients. If you want your children to have easy access to cocaine or heroine you need mental help.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/14 20:16:54
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 00:28:11
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    Hey if that happens you will be able to mainline the kool-aid you have been banging with children. I bet that would make you proud even more than you already are because of your life style.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 05:25:52
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 12:44:17
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    LOL I do not use drugs but obviously YOU do from your statements. You even admit in a post below you want to sell drugs. You can prey on children and sell them heroine. You are a sick bastard that needs to be imprisoned.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 12:53:11
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 13:27:27
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    I see your LIBERAL greed is still strong. I dont use drugs but is is well known that LIBERALS are the drug users in this country. YOU would love to profit off the misery of others, its the liberal way.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 13:32:41
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 14:23:10
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    LIBERAL GREED profiting off others misery.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 14:36:31
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 17:29:58
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    YOU not a LWNJ.....LOL!
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 17:33:58 (edited)
  • marcuss... dallas 2012/04/15 18:28:38
    marcuss LIBERALS ARE IDIOTS
    You SAABF2nds.
  • dallas marcuss... 2012/04/15 19:53:37
  • Dan ☮ R... dallas 2012/04/14 21:21:09
    Dan ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +4
    A government monopoly on drugs would solve nothing.
    The key problem with banning drugs is that you create a violent black market. We'd still have gangs dealing drugs even with this government monopoly unless the government sold the drugs at obscenely low prices with few to no restrictions, which would never happen.
  • dallas Dan ☮ R... 2012/04/14 21:27:22
  • Dan ☮ R... dallas 2012/04/14 21:31:09
    Dan ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +1
    Just flat out decriminalize, and treat drug abuse as an illness rather than crime. That's how you kill the gangs and cartels.
  • dallas Dan ☮ R... 2012/04/14 21:35:43
  • Dan ☮ R... dallas 2012/04/14 22:28:44
    Dan ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +1
    People want to sell medical marijuana...

    And the point is to make drug cartels not want to sell drugs. Cartels are only involved because illegal substances are inherently more expensive. Make it legal, the price drops and they cant compete with the normal market and must find new sources of income or die.
  • jacob crim 2012/04/14 18:52:59
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    jacob crim
    +3
    Anyone who thinks the war on drugs is a good thing are either completely ignorant or completely idiotic. Not only is it a waste of money but it also creates more crime, more people in jail (most over non violent crimes) and will always be yet another "war" our government can not win.
  • Writer M 2012/04/14 18:48:26
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    Writer M
    +1
    In poverty, pain, entertainment, and shame, as long as there is a demand, there will be a supply. And, if you stop the drugs, you END BILLION DOLLAR JOBS for the many Latino drug cartels that cater to impoverished communities - their clients our criminals, especially poor black communities, hungry, desperate, jobless and homeless, escaping realities ALL CRACKED UP.
  • Maci 2012/04/14 18:41:26
  • Red Branch Maci 2012/04/15 02:00:57
    Red Branch
    Carter could have stopped it. Clinton could have stopped it. Obama could have stopped it.

    Soros, the Obama handler, wants all drugs legalized; so I expect some big changes soon.
  • Maci Red Branch 2012/04/15 09:45:45
  • Red Branch Maci 2012/04/15 22:14:26
    Red Branch
    I didn't skip him. Since you knew about Nixon, I know that you would also know about both Bush's & Reagan.
    It is just that Carter was the first opportunity to undo what Nixon did.

    However, since money to fund the War on Drugs comes from Congress, maybe you should focus on that.
  • Maci Red Branch 2012/04/17 02:28:27 (edited)
  • Red Branch Maci 2012/04/17 03:44:17
    Red Branch
    I answered this already.
    Since you know Nixon started it, I knew you would blame the Republican presidents, so I saw no reason to state the obvious. Ordinarily I would do that for a Lib.
    As long as Congress appropriates the money, the president cannot refuse to spend it on the allocated purpose.
    But the Dem presidents could have attempted to influence Congress not to appropriate funds for a drug war. But they thought it was a good idea.

    Drug users are primarily Democrats.
  • Maci Red Branch 2012/04/17 03:54:58
  • Mike 2012/04/14 18:28:26
    Yes, it is a failed policy
    Mike
    +1
    Not only failed it's gotten much worse holder drugs

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