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Exactly Who Vets A Presidential Candidate ?

Bo 2011/04/20 04:21:13
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With all the questions about the Obama eligibility and a veto by Jan Brewer on a bill that required proof exactly who is the responsible party for vetting a candidate ? Is the political parties policing their own rodeo ? If they are there is some definite problems with this. But apparently no one is........ case in point.
http://thesteadydrip.blogspot.com/2009/02/vetting-presidentia...

It was not the Supreme Court that vetted Obama, not the state courts, not the election commissions, not the attorneys general, not the legislature, not the DNC and not the Hawaii Office of Vital Statistics. Just who did vet Barack Obama? You guessed it, the internet!

The document Obama and the DNC offered which is now alleged to be fraudulent was posted only to the internet. The Daily Kos may be the high holy blog spot for space mountain type ego-centric wordsmithing, foul language and liberal blather but it is not the Supreme Court. Snopes and Factcheck are pretty close neighbors to the Kos. Regardless of who owns these sites they are merely more of the same; the internet!

When the msm, the DNC or anyone else tries to portray the Obama documentation activists as a group of conspiracy enthusiasts limited to the undisciplined ravings of the internet it is truly the pot calling the kettle black.

Nothing significant about Obama's past has ever gone beyond the internet. Should he or his ka-zillion swaggering adorers be surprised that some Americans are now asking for much more than that? Haven't they noticed that those who are now raising the question of Obama's eligibility are only reporting on the internet they are not asking the internet to settle the issue. That's more than we've gotten so far!

I am not a legal expert or well versed constitutionalist but I'm certain that the vetting of presidential candidates was never assigned by any law of this land to the internet. It was Barack Obama who showed his documents to the world on a medium that shows countless hours of videos where people try to jump off buildings on to a watermelon or swallow rubber ducky's to entertain the blithering. Should we take them seriously, should we take him seriously?
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  • jr 2011/04/20 12:29:55
    Who is doing it?
    jr
    +6
    Those of us that attempted to vet this candidate Obama were drowned out by his propaganda spewing liberal army of acorn idiots

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  • Annette 2011/04/24 07:19:23
    I know who vets a candidate
    Annette
    +1
    Presidential candidates are self-declared, meaning they decide to run on there own. During primaries, many candidates from each party, Democratic and Republican, run for the nomination. Each one of the 50 states have either a Caucus or a primary election. In a primary election, people go to the polls and vote for the best candidate in the party they are registered for. If you are a registered republican then you vote for the best republican candidate and visa-versa. In a caucus, a group of democrats and a group of republicans from the state meet at a certain place in the state, usually a school, town center, or lecture hall. The groups are then spilt up into smaller groups for what candidate they support. When this is all done, a mediator counts the heads for each person in a group and the candidate with the most people in his or her group wins the nomination for that state.

    In the national election, each state votes on the first Tuesday in November. This race is between one republican, one democrat and sometimes a third party candidate. If a candidate gets the most votes in a state then the electoral college awards that candidate how ever many votes that state carries. For example, Massachusetts has 12 electroral votes. If Barrack Obama wins the most votes in MA then he will...





    Presidential candidates are self-declared, meaning they decide to run on there own. During primaries, many candidates from each party, Democratic and Republican, run for the nomination. Each one of the 50 states have either a Caucus or a primary election. In a primary election, people go to the polls and vote for the best candidate in the party they are registered for. If you are a registered republican then you vote for the best republican candidate and visa-versa. In a caucus, a group of democrats and a group of republicans from the state meet at a certain place in the state, usually a school, town center, or lecture hall. The groups are then spilt up into smaller groups for what candidate they support. When this is all done, a mediator counts the heads for each person in a group and the candidate with the most people in his or her group wins the nomination for that state.

    In the national election, each state votes on the first Tuesday in November. This race is between one republican, one democrat and sometimes a third party candidate. If a candidate gets the most votes in a state then the electoral college awards that candidate how ever many votes that state carries. For example, Massachusetts has 12 electroral votes. If Barrack Obama wins the most votes in MA then he will be awarded 12 electoral votes. A candidate needs 270 out of 538 votes to win the presidency.

    And that is the process.

    Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How...

    As I understand things from the State level, it is up to each state to determine the legitimacy of the candidates running. Also, in the case of 0bama, Nancy Pelosi signed off on him "twice", which went unquestioned.
    (more)
  • VonDruid Annette 2013/01/31 03:24:16
    VonDruid
    +1
    That's not vetting, that's voting. Vetting is checking out the credentials, everyone who works for the government must pass a background check by the FBI. Why shouldn't the highest office in the land? He is privy to to far more sensitive info than most people will ever see. Vice presidential candidates must undergo a background check, Obama managed to bypass that by never being one. I guess the founding fathers figured the people were smart enough not to put someone in the office with no experience.
  • texasred 2011/04/21 00:54:35
    Who is doing it?
    texasred
    +2
    The people that tried to do it were shut down by the MSM. If no one else is doing their job, you would expect the media to do it. But I guess, if the media is owned by Soros, it just doesn't get done.
  • beachbum 2011/04/20 20:59:26
    Who is doing it?
    beachbum
    +4
    I guess it depends on the candidate since we know nothing of Obama's past, and no one has ever stepped up to the plate and said they knew him in school, attended his wedding, etc.
  • Annette beachbum 2011/04/24 07:20:54
    Annette
    +2
    And that is an amazing statement that no one has stepped up to say they attended his wedding! That is even more significant than not being remembered at school.
  • MG-42 2011/04/20 16:45:34
    I know who vets a candidate
    MG-42
    The Speaker of the House & the FBI.
  • Drew~PWCM~JLA~ 2011/04/20 15:21:53
    Who is doing it?
    Drew~PWCM~JLA~
    +4
    The FEC is supposed to but they failed. Supposedly Pukosi and a few other House members vouched for It. As it stands our country nor myself has a President. If It came to me and tried to order me around as the Pres I tell It to stuff it up It's ass.
  • Striker Drew~PW... 2011/04/25 01:16:29
    Striker
    +2
    and those who vouched should prepare for major fraud charges, arrest, prosecution, jail and criminal records which NEVER go away!
  • GINGERBREAD 2011/04/20 13:09:47
    Who is doing it?
    GINGERBREAD
    +4
    Normally, it's the press that vets these candidates. But, since the arrival of the IDIOT IN CHARGE, the only ones that this LAMESTREAM MEDIA are vetting are the republicans, especially the conservatives. Every republican and especially the conservatives, had had a complete PROCTOLOGICAL examination. EXCEPT of course BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA. Not one of these lamestream media ever gone through how he came to be and who his friends were.
  • jr 2011/04/20 12:29:55
    Who is doing it?
    jr
    +6
    Those of us that attempted to vet this candidate Obama were drowned out by his propaganda spewing liberal army of acorn idiots
  • Hula girl - Friends not Fol... 2011/04/20 05:06:27
    I know who vets a candidate
    Hula girl - Friends not Followers
    +4
    The party they represent is suppose to vet them and each State is to also certify them before they go on the ballet. So each State the Secretary of State is the one who's office must verify eligibility. It's also why the liberals have worked harder at putting progressives in that position more than the governors.

    I know in the case of Sarah Palin she was vetted very carefully but she was sent a $50,000 vetting bill that no one told her about until after they didn't win. That's just wrong. Don't put a person on the ballet if you are the one that asked them to be there and then ask them to pay for it.
  • Bo Hula gi... 2011/04/20 23:41:37 (edited)
    Bo
    I found this in response to a question posed in Alabama..


    A number of people have contacted their State Elections boards or State Secretaries of State to find out if candidates are vetted for eligibility for the office of the president, and how they are vetted.

    The responses have been that the states do not verify the qualifications of the candidates.

    State responses

    Alabama

    Thank you for your question regarding the state policy on eligibility requirements for candidates placed on the election ballots.

    I believe that Attorney General’s Opinion 98-200 is helpful in addressing your question. This opinion concludes that the Secretary of State does not have the obligation to evaluate all of the qualifications of the nominees of political parties and independent candidates for state offices prior to certifying the nominees and candidates to the probate judges. The opinion also notes that if the Secretary of State gains knowledge from an official source arising from the performance of duties prescribed by law, that a candidate has not met a certifying qualification, the Secretary of State should not qualify the candidate.

    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...

    And this in Arizona...
    ARS 16-242 Qualifications for ballot; nomination paper
    A. A person seeking nomination as ...

























    I found this in response to a question posed in Alabama..


    A number of people have contacted their State Elections boards or State Secretaries of State to find out if candidates are vetted for eligibility for the office of the president, and how they are vetted.

    The responses have been that the states do not verify the qualifications of the candidates.

    State responses

    Alabama

    Thank you for your question regarding the state policy on eligibility requirements for candidates placed on the election ballots.

    I believe that Attorney General’s Opinion 98-200 is helpful in addressing your question. This opinion concludes that the Secretary of State does not have the obligation to evaluate all of the qualifications of the nominees of political parties and independent candidates for state offices prior to certifying the nominees and candidates to the probate judges. The opinion also notes that if the Secretary of State gains knowledge from an official source arising from the performance of duties prescribed by law, that a candidate has not met a certifying qualification, the Secretary of State should not qualify the candidate.

    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...

    And this in Arizona...
    ARS 16-242 Qualifications for ballot; nomination paper
    A. A person seeking nomination as a candidate for the office of president of the United States shall sign and cause to be filed with the secretary of state a nomination paper that contains the following information:
    1. The name, residence address and mailing address of the candidate.
    2. The name of the recognized political party from which the person seeks nomination.
    3. The name and address of the chairman of the candidate’s state committee.
    4. The exact manner for printing the candidate’s name on the presidential preference ballot pursuant to section 16-311.
    B. The nomination paper shall be filed not less than fifty days nor more than seventy days before the presidential preference election and not later than 5:00 p.m. on the last day for filing.
    C. Section 16-351 does not apply to a nomination paper filed pursuant to this section.
    D. Within seventy-two hours after the close of filing the secretary of state shall certify to the officer in charge of elections the names of the candidates who are qualified for the presidential preference election ballot.
    A candidate is required to file a paper but there is no mention of vetting or finding out if the submitted information is correct.
    And Alaska
    The Division of Elections determines eligibility of a candidate following the laws outlined in the Alaska Constitution, Title 15 of the Alaska Statutes and in Title 6 of the Alaska Administrative Code. Candidates who are filing as a recognized political party candidate for state or congressional offices or as a judicial candidate for retention complete a Declaration of Candidacy. State or congressional candidates who are not affiliated with a recognized political party may obtain ballot access in the general election by filing as a Nominating Petition or write-in candidate. Forms submitted under these processes are reviewed by the division’s staff and the director to determine eligibility of a candidate based on adherence to Alaska’s laws in conjunction with the information provided by the candidate on the form. If the director determines that the candidate has met the requirements of the law for that office he/she is certified for the ballot.
    Arizona
    The registered political parties in Arizona submit to the Secretary of State their party's nominees for President and Vice President. Presidential Electors file nomination documents with the Secretary of State and the information is provided to the Arizona Counties for that county's General Election ballot.
    California
    While the Secretary of State certifies candidates for the ballot, each political party is responsible for nominating the candidate they wish to place on the ballot.
    Colorado
    First, please understand that, pursuant to Colorado statute, the process of nominating and certifying presidential candidates to the ballot is party-oriented; candidates are certified to the state and, therefore, the legal responsibility for confirming citizenship (or any other qualification) lies with the certifying entity.
    Connecticut
    As Secretary of the State of Connecticut , I do not have the statutory authority to remove a candidate from the ballot unless that candidate officially withdraws by filing a form with my office to that effect. Likewise, neither the Connecticut General Statutes nor the Constitution of the State of Connecticut authorizes me to investigate a Presidential candidate's eligibility to run for the office of President of the United States.
    Delaware
    They are not vetted my office. We receive the nominations from the parties who have nominated them.
    Florida
    Thank you for inquiring about the determination of a candidate's eligibility to run for President of United States. The Florida Department of State does not have investigative or enforcement authority to ensure that major partiesʼ Presidential candidates are properly qualified to be President of the United States. The U.S. Constitution establishes the qualifying requirements for President. Under Florida law, the way in which a major party's candidate is placed on the ballot is that the state executive committee of each political party submits its slate of presidential electors for its candidate before September 1st of each presidential election year; then, by law, the names of candidates are printed on the ballot. Those candidates are not required to provide any documents to the State that they meet the qualifications for office.
    Georgia
    Recently, a lawsuit was filed claiming that Mr. Obama is not qualified to run for President and should not appear on Georgia's ballot. See Terry v. Handel, In the Superior Court of Fulton County, State of Georgia, Civil Action File No. 2008CV158774. On October 24, 2008, the Court entered an Order recognizing that in Georgia, as elsewhere in the United States, voters cast their ballots for "presidential electors," rather than directly for a candidate, when voting for the office of President of the United States. See, e.g., U.S. Const. art. II, § 1, cl. 3; O.C.G.A. § 21-2-172. Because of this, the Secretary of State of Georgia does not have the authority to refuse to allow someone to be listed as a candidate for President of the United States when such individual has been properly nominated by a political party.
    There's many more here but as you can see there is no requirements or uniformity to any state.
    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...
    (more)
  • Striker Hula gi... 2011/04/25 01:23:58
    Striker
    +1
    Sadly, all the States do is notarize the signature of the filer. That's why States are now passing their own vetting laws. Arizona's was not very good, so Gov Brewer wisely chose not to sign it, but there are about 10 others working on similar. It would take very few states keeping pseudo-prez off the ballot to kill all chances of America having to put up with him again. Unbelievable that Congress has done nothing!
  • Hula gi... Striker 2011/04/25 03:06:40
    Hula girl - Friends not Followers
    +1
    Too many Progressives on the take to take this country down. I'd never thought I'd see the day there would be a socialist in the White House and in Congress.
  • The Govenor 2011/04/20 04:39:11
  • No nonsense NanC...don't BS... 2011/04/20 04:29:46
    I thought someone was
    No nonsense NanC...don't BS me!
    +3
    But no one vetted 0bama........................ now we are stuck with the dud.
  • Bo 2011/04/20 04:29:37
    Who is doing it?
    Bo
    +5
    Vetting is a process of checking out the credentials of potential candidates......but no one seems to be doing it or at least is designated to do so.
  • No nons... Bo 2011/04/20 04:32:00
    No nonsense NanC...don't BS me!
    +3
    The media usually does a good job of vetting, but unfortunately the got in bed with 0bama
    instead of vetting........... The love affair continues.
  • Bo No nons... 2011/04/20 04:37:09
    Bo
    +3
    This should be a function of the Government not left up to the media.
  • No nons... Bo 2011/04/20 16:40:55 (edited)
    No nonsense NanC...don't BS me!
    +1
    The political party should vet a potential candidate because the party has to sign
    their name to the verification that their candidate satisfies the Constitutional
    requirements to fulfill the office for which they are running, as does each state
    before they put the name of the candidate on their state ballot. I have read
    that Hawaii, whom supposedly has his b.c. on file, changed the statement to
    not include qualified and satisfies the Constitutional requirements.

    Interesting that Gov. Brewer vetoed the legislation to require a presidential
    candidate to show their b.c. before he goes on the state ballot, but I also
    heard that the legislature has enough GOP votes to override her veto, should
    they be inclined to do so.
  • Bo Bo 2011/04/21 01:54:29
    Bo
    Check this out...
    I found this in response to a question posed in Alabama..


    A number of people have contacted their State Elections boards or State Secretaries of State to find out if candidates are vetted for eligibility for the office of the president, and how they are vetted.

    The responses have been that the states do not verify the qualifications of the candidates.

    State responses

    Alabama

    Thank you for your question regarding the state policy on eligibility requirements for candidates placed on the election ballots.

    I believe that Attorney General’s Opinion 98-200 is helpful in addressing your question. This opinion concludes that the Secretary of State does not have the obligation to evaluate all of the qualifications of the nominees of political parties and independent candidates for state offices prior to certifying the nominees and candidates to the probate judges. The opinion also notes that if the Secretary of State gains knowledge from an official source arising from the performance of duties prescribed by law, that a candidate has not met a certifying qualification, the Secretary of State should not qualify the candidate.

    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...

    And this in Arizona...
    ARS 16-242 Qualifications for ballot; nomination paper
    A. A person se...

























    Check this out...
    I found this in response to a question posed in Alabama..


    A number of people have contacted their State Elections boards or State Secretaries of State to find out if candidates are vetted for eligibility for the office of the president, and how they are vetted.

    The responses have been that the states do not verify the qualifications of the candidates.

    State responses

    Alabama

    Thank you for your question regarding the state policy on eligibility requirements for candidates placed on the election ballots.

    I believe that Attorney General’s Opinion 98-200 is helpful in addressing your question. This opinion concludes that the Secretary of State does not have the obligation to evaluate all of the qualifications of the nominees of political parties and independent candidates for state offices prior to certifying the nominees and candidates to the probate judges. The opinion also notes that if the Secretary of State gains knowledge from an official source arising from the performance of duties prescribed by law, that a candidate has not met a certifying qualification, the Secretary of State should not qualify the candidate.

    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...

    And this in Arizona...
    ARS 16-242 Qualifications for ballot; nomination paper
    A. A person seeking nomination as a candidate for the office of president of the United States shall sign and cause to be filed with the secretary of state a nomination paper that contains the following information:
    1. The name, residence address and mailing address of the candidate.
    2. The name of the recognized political party from which the person seeks nomination.
    3. The name and address of the chairman of the candidate’s state committee.
    4. The exact manner for printing the candidate’s name on the presidential preference ballot pursuant to section 16-311.
    B. The nomination paper shall be filed not less than fifty days nor more than seventy days before the presidential preference election and not later than 5:00 p.m. on the last day for filing.
    C. Section 16-351 does not apply to a nomination paper filed pursuant to this section.
    D. Within seventy-two hours after the close of filing the secretary of state shall certify to the officer in charge of elections the names of the candidates who are qualified for the presidential preference election ballot.
    A candidate is required to file a paper but there is no mention of vetting or finding out if the submitted information is correct.
    And Alaska
    The Division of Elections determines eligibility of a candidate following the laws outlined in the Alaska Constitution, Title 15 of the Alaska Statutes and in Title 6 of the Alaska Administrative Code. Candidates who are filing as a recognized political party candidate for state or congressional offices or as a judicial candidate for retention complete a Declaration of Candidacy. State or congressional candidates who are not affiliated with a recognized political party may obtain ballot access in the general election by filing as a Nominating Petition or write-in candidate. Forms submitted under these processes are reviewed by the division’s staff and the director to determine eligibility of a candidate based on adherence to Alaska’s laws in conjunction with the information provided by the candidate on the form. If the director determines that the candidate has met the requirements of the law for that office he/she is certified for the ballot.
    Arizona
    The registered political parties in Arizona submit to the Secretary of State their party's nominees for President and Vice President. Presidential Electors file nomination documents with the Secretary of State and the information is provided to the Arizona Counties for that county's General Election ballot.
    California
    While the Secretary of State certifies candidates for the ballot, each political party is responsible for nominating the candidate they wish to place on the ballot.
    Colorado
    First, please understand that, pursuant to Colorado statute, the process of nominating and certifying presidential candidates to the ballot is party-oriented; candidates are certified to the state and, therefore, the legal responsibility for confirming citizenship (or any other qualification) lies with the certifying entity.
    Connecticut
    As Secretary of the State of Connecticut , I do not have the statutory authority to remove a candidate from the ballot unless that candidate officially withdraws by filing a form with my office to that effect. Likewise, neither the Connecticut General Statutes nor the Constitution of the State of Connecticut authorizes me to investigate a Presidential candidate's eligibility to run for the office of President of the United States.
    Delaware
    They are not vetted my office. We receive the nominations from the parties who have nominated them.
    Florida
    Thank you for inquiring about the determination of a candidate's eligibility to run for President of United States. The Florida Department of State does not have investigative or enforcement authority to ensure that major partiesʼ Presidential candidates are properly qualified to be President of the United States. The U.S. Constitution establishes the qualifying requirements for President. Under Florida law, the way in which a major party's candidate is placed on the ballot is that the state executive committee of each political party submits its slate of presidential electors for its candidate before September 1st of each presidential election year; then, by law, the names of candidates are printed on the ballot. Those candidates are not required to provide any documents to the State that they meet the qualifications for office.
    Georgia
    Recently, a lawsuit was filed claiming that Mr. Obama is not qualified to run for President and should not appear on Georgia's ballot. See Terry v. Handel, In the Superior Court of Fulton County, State of Georgia, Civil Action File No. 2008CV158774. On October 24, 2008, the Court entered an Order recognizing that in Georgia, as elsewhere in the United States, voters cast their ballots for "presidential electors," rather than directly for a candidate, when voting for the office of President of the United States. See, e.g., U.S. Const. art. II, § 1, cl. 3; O.C.G.A. § 21-2-172. Because of this, the Secretary of State of Georgia does not have the authority to refuse to allow someone to be listed as a candidate for President of the United States when such individual has been properly nominated by a political party.
    There's many more here but as you can see there is no requirements or uniformity to any state.
    http://saveourrights.wikia.co...
    (more)

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