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'Bully' Documentary Currently Rated R: Should It Be Changed to PG-13?

Film 2012/03/12 01:02:59
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A new documentary about bullying, appropriated titled “Bully,” is currently rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). However, the people behind the film, as well as thousands of others around the country, are calling for the rating to be changed to PG-13 in order to make it more accessible to young people.

The MPAA decided to give “Bully” the R mark primarily because of a scene where a bully describes what he will do to a victim using variations of the F-word. Use of the F-word more than once, or only once when used to describe sexual intercourse, almost always results in an automatic R rating.

Last month, The Weinstein Company, which created the film, petitioned to have the rating changed to PG-13. TWC Co-Chairman Harvey Weinstein and Alex Libby, one of the bullied children in the film, argued that the R rating would prevent the film from reaching young audiences. In particular, the R rating prevents the documentary from being shown in schools. (The studio was planning on screening the film at various middle and high schools.) Additionally, many teens prefer to go to the movies with their friends instead of their parents, but you must be at least 17 years old to see an R-rated film without a parent or guardian.

The Weinstein Company lost their appeal. They were one vote short of the two-thirds required to overturn an MPAA rating. However, a ratings change doesn’t seem to be completely off the table. On Thursday, MPAA and Weinstein will be hosting an invitation only screening and panel event for Washington D.C. educators, to discuss “the challenges educators face in dealing with bullying in the classroom.” However, it seems likely that the rating itself will also be a topic of discussion.

What do you think SodaHeads? “Bully” is currently rated R, but should it be changed to PG-13?





Read More: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/movies/2012/03/bul...

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  • Just Jenn for Now 2012/03/12 02:00:25 (edited)
    Yes
    Just Jenn for Now
    +31
    ... at first I was going to say "Yes" because I thought it would be over a graphically violent scene.

    But over some "F" bombs? Sorry, but no.


    Face it, everyone: Children have heard the "F" word and figured out what it means by age 13.

    This isn't the 60s anymore where kids watch their mouths and are raised by picture-perfect parents. This is documentary, and thus must stick to reality, and bullies DO use these words.

    And this IS something that is APPROPRIATE for kids age 13 and up to watch as a glimpse of reality, and unfortunately a film some kids may be able to relate to; AND LEARN FROM.


    Still don't agree? How about this: "The Dark Knight" got a PG-13 rating, and even though it was clean language-wise, it had TONS of violence and even death in it. If THAT can get a PG-13 rating, so can this movie.



    It's time to stop bubble-wrapping our kids anyway.



    bubble wrapping kids

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  • Mr.Hood... critter171 2012/03/12 23:17:13
    Mr.Hoodz the Truth Troll
    How can you not compare the two? The bully is taking the victim's right to live a stress free life. We can easily compare the two. You just don't want to compare the two because then you would be considered a hypocrite.
  • critter171 Mr.Hood... 2012/03/13 03:00:27
    critter171
    the problem with that is that one school have policy two you get more in trouble if you fight back than the bully gets a slap on wrist your causing the problem to continue not end. yea no you can't compare war to bully rather you damn want to or not. they totally different things. This why we had people to fight in war to stop people for doing this in school guess what it has yet to happen.
  • JonahTFOT critter171 2012/03/12 20:15:52
    JonahTFOT
    +1
    I agree, fighting is not the answer... severe verbal abuse is =p
  • Maci critter171 2012/03/13 00:48:08
  • critter171 Maci 2012/03/13 03:00:52
    critter171
    no its never the answer no matter how much you want it to.
  • Maci critter171 2012/03/13 03:20:00
  • Emily Maci 2012/03/12 17:39:59
    Emily
    +1
    And get yourself into trouble? Yeah right! From my experience, a bully can get away with it for years; if you don't have a strong base of friends to protect you, and you get caught in a violent act, you're the one who's punished; and heavily at that.
  • Maci Emily 2012/03/13 00:50:26
  • Emily Maci 2012/03/13 11:21:38
    Emily
    That was me for five years. If I said a word against them, next thing I knew teachers were telling me that I was lucky I wasn't on report, and only my recordas a good student kept them from doing that.
  • Emily Maci 2012/03/12 17:37:50
    Emily
    +1
    You talk about blathering; it sounds like you're the one blathering, and it's complete nonsense too.
  • Maci Emily 2012/03/13 00:51:46
  • critter171 Maci 2012/03/13 03:02:17
    critter171
    no we except the school to do there job and we excxpet school to step up and punish the one who is doing the punishment not two people the one who is the bully has to be handle first. fighting is not an answer i know
  • Jenai Goss critter171 2012/03/13 05:47:54
    Jenai Goss
    +2
    My school never (ever) punished a bully. Not in gradeschool, not in middle school, and not in highschool. It didn't matter if I was punched or kicked in full view of a teacher. In gradeschool, they would claim "Oh, I didn't clearly see, so its just hearsay" and do nothing. In highschool, the teacher would just grin and say something like "boys will be boys" or "you should have let him cut in front of you then", as if it was my fault that I refused to let a boy cut in line in front of all the girls at kickball because he thought they were weaker players.

    In highschool, sexual harassment became a huge issue as well. ("Standards" weren't liked very much). Even when the office had definitive proof (ie, the boys did it right in front of them, with written evidence), they did nothing. Reports I filed the school did nothing, except *tell* whoever I filed the report against (a federal crime) which would lead to retailiation in the halls.

    Still, what probably saved me from more serious bullying than I faced (beyond some kicking, shoving, punching, social ostrazation, other kids being told not to make friends with me, partners randomly going on strike in school projects just to watch me squirm (Since a bad grade didn't affect them), was that I learned to make friends with half the bulli...









    My school never (ever) punished a bully. Not in gradeschool, not in middle school, and not in highschool. It didn't matter if I was punched or kicked in full view of a teacher. In gradeschool, they would claim "Oh, I didn't clearly see, so its just hearsay" and do nothing. In highschool, the teacher would just grin and say something like "boys will be boys" or "you should have let him cut in front of you then", as if it was my fault that I refused to let a boy cut in line in front of all the girls at kickball because he thought they were weaker players.

    In highschool, sexual harassment became a huge issue as well. ("Standards" weren't liked very much). Even when the office had definitive proof (ie, the boys did it right in front of them, with written evidence), they did nothing. Reports I filed the school did nothing, except *tell* whoever I filed the report against (a federal crime) which would lead to retailiation in the halls.

    Still, what probably saved me from more serious bullying than I faced (beyond some kicking, shoving, punching, social ostrazation, other kids being told not to make friends with me, partners randomly going on strike in school projects just to watch me squirm (Since a bad grade didn't affect them), was that I learned to make friends with half the bullies and tease back.

    For example: I could never get a good grade in speech class (and as a strait A student, this bugged me), because the kids would all 'talk over' my speech in a chorus of teasing remarks. The teacher took this as me being unable to command an audience's attention. Finally, one speech, I went to the back of the class and nonchalantly slammed my hand down on his desk as hard as I could. I teasingly looked at him and said "The Atom Bomb...." and began my speech walking through the class. They listened to every word and even discussed it with me after. (And the boy ended up with a crush on me :P) The next time he gave a speech, he returned the favor by slamming his hand on my desk, which everyone found hilarious. Suddenly, the class of delinquents which had mostly hated me were my friends. While this did not stop bullying by the a few of "pack leader" students, it did make my last year of school a lot easier. It was also good for both me and them. I was able to understand their complaints with me (I came off as stuck up and hard to get to know) a lot easier when we were talking with each other than when they were bullying me and I was trying to hide from or ignore them.

    There was another boy, who was not a bully and normally rather sweet, but he did ask an inappropriate comment. I couldn't slap him (his friend was in the way), so I punched him. Apparently, this merited me a great deal of respect and stopped boys from asking inappropriate questions for a while. (As I had inadvertantly punched the captain of the wrestling team).

    I also defended some of the boys against false accusations of theft, and helped some with their homework - and apparently when you use your nerd powers for good (and not evil) you win friends.

    This is not to excuse bullying in any of its forms - but it was interesting for me in that my high school years sorted out the true bullies (those who were doing it because their popularity/position was threatened) from the circumstantial bullies (those who were following others, or responding to how they perceived me to be).

    Also, while it is always good to report concrete bullying incidents to the school, trusting the school to "save" a child is not the best plan. If I had not been trusting Christ to be my salvation, and had not had good parents to support me, then the failures of my school and fellow students would have hit me a lot harder. I probably would not have had the determination to try, try again, and would have acted out a lot more myself.
    (more)
  • critter171 Jenai Goss 2012/03/13 12:01:39
    critter171
    school have zero policy about bullying your school fail to protect the students. student should feel save going to school. i am not saying school should save a student i am saying they need to enfocre the damn rules. that there job. Fighting won't help it make it worst.
  • Smiley 2012/03/12 15:59:08
    Yes
    Smiley
    +3
    What would be the point of trying to stop bulling if the kids can't truly see the movie.
  • stephanie 2012/03/12 15:57:42
    Yes
    stephanie
    +2
    As someone who has been bullied and not because they thought i was gay. Cause I´m not gay. I was bullied because some girl had problems at home. Anyone can be bullied.
  • Cordingly 2012/03/12 15:47:46
    Yes
    Cordingly
    +2
    The MPAA is broken.
  • Lucy Sparkles :3 2012/03/12 15:17:52
    Yes
    Lucy Sparkles :3
    +2
    i think more people would watch it and therefore be affected by it if it was changed to PG-13.
  • elijahin24 2012/03/12 15:14:06
    Yes
    elijahin24
    +3
    And arbitrary ratings system is flawed in many ways. This is certainly one of them. It isn't like kids aren't hearing this language every day anyway. Music, television, books and the mouths of many of the adults in their lives, and yes their peers too; keep that word in the forefront of the juvenile lexicon at all times. It is denial to pretend it isn't there.
    This word, used in this context, is not promoting its use, nor is it promoting sex. It is used by a kid who is the villain here. If anything, it says that this is the behavior to AVOID, and to frown upon. To remove this word, would be to remove the realism of the movie, and in doing so, you risk alienating the very audience you're trying to reach.

    The MPAA has taken on a roll of morality police. They should relinquish that roll. They're really bad at it.
  • T. James H 2012/03/12 15:10:18
  • Sam DePecan 2012/03/12 14:31:06
    No
    Sam DePecan
    RATINGs don't really mean anything anymore; and when there was a period of time in our lives when (where) there actually were no RATINGs; then that is the time when they should have been enforced by possibly even jail-time and/or heavy fines, to say the least. I can still remember the scariest movie that I ever saw in my entire life; and it was back in the early 50s and I still remember it till this day. It was indeed similar to The Exorcist, but what they did in this movie was to just beat people, and store their remains inside a trunk; and set the trunk underneath a tree in the City Park, somewhere. They never showed the mangled body, but at an age of "under 13" for a movie-goer, they didn't have to. I can still remember how that sometimes I felt like I was going to barf when some innocent citizen would open a trunk. Yet, most of this "animated over-rated theatrical crap" that is turned out of Hollywood, today, is actually many times bordering on humor; and it even sometimes brings about a chuckle when it was really the movie-makers intentions at all . . . It's just more boredom . . . Boosting salaries of all of those deceitful, phony people involved, is just another proven way of boosting RATINGs. Who cares!? . . . Hollywood sucks, anyway. THAT is really what it's all about . . . It's about a Hollywood that sucks.
  • TheNightFly 2012/03/12 14:26:23 (edited)
    Yes
    TheNightFly
    +2
    YOU BETTER lower the F***ING RATING or I'll PUNCH YOU ALL in da FACES!
  • V~POTL~PWCM~JLA 2012/03/12 14:24:39
    Yes
    V~POTL~PWCM~JLA
    +1
    The topic is relevant to a PG-13 audience. As for the language, I doubt there is anything in the film that the kids don't hear every day on the school bus.
  • Get Bashed 2012/03/12 14:19:05
    Yes
    Get Bashed
    +1
    Everyone should be able to see the affects of bullying. It is not to be taken lightly! Did anyone see the Oprah show about the children that committed suicide to avoid their bullies? Very sad indeed.
  • Erica Bryelle 2012/03/12 13:57:46
    No
    Erica Bryelle
    If a child can bully someone then i think they can watch a rated R documentary on it...I feel strongly about this because well ive been bullied since i was in 6th grade....
  • Shawn 2012/03/12 13:55:39
    Yes
    Shawn
    The message is primarily meant for young people.
  • critter171 Shawn 2012/03/12 16:17:22
    critter171
    for everyone not just young people accdoring to flim makers a school in los angles flim and and a student who was watching the movie stood up to the bullies RIGHT THERE!
  • Emily 2012/03/12 13:52:11
    Yes
    Emily
    +2
    I already knew what the F-word meant long before I was thirteen. You see, I asked my mum what it meant, like, 2 WHOLE YEARS before that.
  • Commenting_one 2012/03/12 13:49:04
    Yes
    Commenting_one
    +1
    It seems to me that kids are not foreign to this language so that doesn't matter and since the movie is pertinent to their age range, I think it is appropriate to do so.
  • smitty 2012/03/12 13:36:51
    No
    smitty
    Why do we as parents need a documentary. If parents do their job, instead of relying on others then our society will be better. The child is yours. You did the deed. You need to accept responsibility and give the child the tools needed to survive.

    Nowadays, kids are just a tax deduction for parents. Time to slow down... stop-running and smell the roses. It is not the end of the journey that counts but those things that crop up on the way.

    Time for personal responsibility.
  • Emily smitty 2012/03/12 13:51:02
    Emily
    +4
    The fact is that some people would rather look through rose-tinted glasses than see the truth. And it's for children as well, because some don't see bullying when they are the ones bullying, but if they see this, then perhaps it will change their thoughts. And some improvement is better than no improvement at all. And right now, whatever "school policies" there are, bullies have the upper hand.
  • smitty Emily 2012/03/12 15:28:54
    smitty
    Our society has become a nanny society. Lots of "bullying" is not bullying. I was watching the Bachelorette with my wife (well I think that is what it is). There was one girl that kept saying some other girl was bullying everyone. Not necessarily the case.

    If you got a wart on your nose that is nasty. I tell you it is nasty. That is not bullying. Then if you respond with agression. I respond with aggression. It is not bullying.

    I would hate to have hollywierd tell me what bullying is. We are getting into a "boy who cried wolf" scenario with bullying. Everyone wants to use it.

    Real cases of bullying should be dealt with. They are easy to distinguish but society has been nannified.
  • critter171 smitty 2012/03/12 16:19:23
    critter171
    bullying can be many forums your are just being ingorant like many adult are. you just proving why it NEEDS TO BE PG 13.
  • Emily critter171 2012/03/12 17:25:17
  • smitty critter171 2012/03/12 18:15:53
    smitty
    Yeah, right. I proved nothing. I am giving my opinion. Maybe you can be more tolerant of my opinion.

    Yeah many adults are ignorant. Why you may ask? Parents do not take responsibility for their kids anymore. My whole point.
  • critter171 smitty 2012/03/12 19:46:33
    critter171
    you believing that someone insutling someone is not bully you believe people who say bullying is not bully i said the fact bully comes in many forums. and for you to even fail to understand makes you ingorant. now parents do they just won't believe everything someone else said...
  • smitty critter171 2012/03/12 20:07:11
    smitty
    No offense. I am having a hard time understanding that.
  • Emily smitty 2012/03/12 17:34:13
    Emily
    +2
    Take your example. Person A has a wart on their nose. You tell them that it's nasty. You don't even know them. You've never spoken to them other than to say something negative. You go online and say "That wart is DISGUSTING!" and 15 other people comment on how disgusting the wart is. How bad does Person A feel? They can't control that they have a wart!!! It's bullying because you offended a person over something that they can't control, and they were offended by it.

    Lovely to see you again smitty.
  • smitty Emily 2012/03/12 18:19:27
    smitty
    +1
    Why would I go online? That's insulting. My mom taught me better.

    What's wrong with me telling you it is nasty. Most "bullying" is done by aquaintences not by strangers.

    Offending someone is not bullying. That is my whole entire point. We have lost the definition of bullying.

    The pleasure is all mine Ms. Emily.
  • Emily smitty 2012/03/12 18:42:06
    Emily
    +2
    So for you is it only bullying when someone pulls out the fists? Sure, if it's a friend who just had a moment where they forgot themselves and says "that wart is horrible!" then that's not bullying. Hang on, here's some research to back me up;
    http://www.bullyonline.org/wo...
    And a definition from the website:

    "Bullying is persistent unwelcome behaviour, mostly using unwarranted or invalid criticism, nit-picking, fault-finding, also exclusion, isolation, being singled out and treated differently, being shouted at, humiliated, excessive monitoring, having verbal and written warnings imposed, and much more. In the workplace, bullying usually focuses on distorted or fabricated allegations of under-performance."

    Not enough proof? Let's move onto another site.

    http://www.bullying.org/exter...

    "Bullying is a conscious, willful, deliberate, hostile and repeated behaviour by one or more people, which is intended to harm others. Bullying
    takes many forms, and can include may different behaviours, such as:
    • physical violence and attacks
    • verbal taunts, name-calling and put-downs
    • threats and intimidation
    • extortion or stealing of money and possessions
    • exclusion from the peer group"

    And three is the magic number:

    http://stopbullyingnow.com/ov...

    "First, we need to know that it includes ...











    So for you is it only bullying when someone pulls out the fists? Sure, if it's a friend who just had a moment where they forgot themselves and says "that wart is horrible!" then that's not bullying. Hang on, here's some research to back me up;
    http://www.bullyonline.org/wo...
    And a definition from the website:

    "Bullying is persistent unwelcome behaviour, mostly using unwarranted or invalid criticism, nit-picking, fault-finding, also exclusion, isolation, being singled out and treated differently, being shouted at, humiliated, excessive monitoring, having verbal and written warnings imposed, and much more. In the workplace, bullying usually focuses on distorted or fabricated allegations of under-performance."

    Not enough proof? Let's move onto another site.

    http://www.bullying.org/exter...

    "Bullying is a conscious, willful, deliberate, hostile and repeated behaviour by one or more people, which is intended to harm others. Bullying
    takes many forms, and can include may different behaviours, such as:
    • physical violence and attacks
    • verbal taunts, name-calling and put-downs
    • threats and intimidation
    • extortion or stealing of money and possessions
    • exclusion from the peer group"

    And three is the magic number:

    http://stopbullyingnow.com/ov...

    "First, we need to know that it includes many different behaviors, including:
    •Physical aggression, including sexualized aggression;
    •Threats;
    •Taking or breaking property;
    •Name calling of many kinds, sometimes focused on personal or family characteristics including disability, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, family income, intelligence, body shape, or appearance;
    •Exclusion and ostracism in many forms, all of which may have the effect of stopping someone from having friends or social connections;
    •Digital and online behaviors that parallel most of the above list.

    See how all of this correlates what I said to bullying.

    You won't post online; doesn't mean you're not a bully; means you're not a cyber bully.

    I almost find myself charmed by your eloquence Mr. Smitty.
    (more)

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