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Are you part of the 1% of America?

Shadow 2012/07/26 22:00:43
Yes
No
Almost there
You!
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For those who don't know what the 1% stands for, "Taken literally, the top 1 percent of American households had a minimum
income of $516,633 — a figure that includes wages, government
transfers and money from capital gains, dividends and other investment
income". 'Washington Post'

Now that you have this info, where do you stand on the high taxation of the 1% to foot the bill for the other 99% of America? Are you still upset about the fact that the tax breaks you will receive in the next few years will not come from YOUR pockets but from the super wealthy?
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  • ruru 2012/07/27 01:43:27
    No
    ruru
    +1
    However I don't begrudge the people who are in the 1%. They provide the capital for business who hire the 99%. They are the risk takers.
  • woodstock 2012/07/27 00:57:24
    No
    woodstock
    I hope to win the lotto one day and then I'll be that 1%. Just wishing and hoping but until that happens I will remain that dreaded 99%. Oh well there is still tomorrow.
  • ~writersblock~ 2012/07/26 22:44:19
    No
    ~writersblock~
    I wish. Far far far from that.
  • Sister Jean 2012/07/26 22:13:24
    No
    Sister Jean
    no
  • Zeruke 2012/07/26 22:12:24
    No
    Zeruke
    with a minimum wage job at 16 hours a week, no where near it
  • Rusty Bubbles 2012/07/26 22:07:51
    No
    Rusty Bubbles
    No, but I understand the sacrifices, time, and expense that the majority of those individuals went through to achieve their standard of living.

    by Pierce Hibma

    Want to really understand the reality of US medical education debt? Then allow me to pull back the curtains to expose the financial monster that awaits me after I earn my MD.


    I am a third medical student at a private medical school in the Midwest. Fortunately, I was able to graduate from college without any financial debt thanks to an athletic scholarship. Unfortunately, I, like many other medical students, pay for my entire medical education and living expenses through student loans.

    The average medical school debt today, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges is $156,456. I can only wish that was true for me. Perhaps the best way to understand the burden of a current medical student’s debt is by example. Here is an approximation of my real-life medical school debt assuming I select forbearance during residency and repay the loan over 15 years:

    Annual cost of tuition: $48,000
    Annual cost of attendance: $67,500 (Includes costs of books/supplies, loan fees, health insurance, licensure fees, living expenses, and transportation allowance)

    Total balance after medical school: $270,000
    Amount subsidi...











    No, but I understand the sacrifices, time, and expense that the majority of those individuals went through to achieve their standard of living.

    by Pierce Hibma

    Want to really understand the reality of US medical education debt? Then allow me to pull back the curtains to expose the financial monster that awaits me after I earn my MD.


    I am a third medical student at a private medical school in the Midwest. Fortunately, I was able to graduate from college without any financial debt thanks to an athletic scholarship. Unfortunately, I, like many other medical students, pay for my entire medical education and living expenses through student loans.

    The average medical school debt today, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges is $156,456. I can only wish that was true for me. Perhaps the best way to understand the burden of a current medical student’s debt is by example. Here is an approximation of my real-life medical school debt assuming I select forbearance during residency and repay the loan over 15 years:

    Annual cost of tuition: $48,000
    Annual cost of attendance: $67,500 (Includes costs of books/supplies, loan fees, health insurance, licensure fees, living expenses, and transportation allowance)

    Total balance after medical school: $270,000
    Amount subsidized: $34,000
    Amount unsubsidized: $236,000

    Interest incurred during 3 years of residency: $100,000
    Total balance after residency: $370,000

    Monthly payment after residency: $3,370 (180 total payments)
    Interest incurred after residency: $237,000
    Total repayment: $607,000

    These financial conclusions were reached via the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Medloans Calculator. Again, these numbers are approximations and many different repayment plans exist, but it certainly highlights the massive financial burdens placed on today’s medical students.

    Pierce Hibma is a medical student.
    (more)
  • NPC 2012/07/26 22:03:56
    Almost there
    NPC
    Would say in the 5%.
  • Juan O'Mara 2012/07/26 22:02:21
    Yes
    Juan O'Mara
    +1
    for I am THE JUAN PERCENT

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