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Are you concerned about the E. Coli outbreak that has spread to 6 states?

Fox Report with Shepard Smith 2012/06/08 20:00:00
Related Topics: E. Coli
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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a recent E. Coli outbreak has sickened at least 14 people in six different states. It has also taken the life of a 21-month-old baby in New Orleans. Are you worried about the infection spreading?
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Top Opinion

  • MOMMA THOMAS 2012/06/12 01:29:50
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    MOMMA THOMAS
    +7
    ALMOST LOST MY SISTER LAST DECEMBER TO E-COLI.......WASH ALL PRODUCE THOROUGHLY, COOK ALL MEATS THROUGH AND THROUGH. SERIOUS, BAD STUFF....SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS HAVING A REACTION TO A FLU SHOT AT FIRST.

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  • ♥K14 2012/06/28 00:08:48
    No, I'm not.
    ♥K14
    Harmless.
  • firebird 2012/06/24 06:13:00
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    firebird
    Yes, Horrible stuff... dangerous and deadly.
  • TKramar 2012/06/13 19:44:19
    No, I'm not.
    TKramar
    I eat more pasta than anything else. With no meat sauce.
  • Torchmanner ~PWCM~JLA 2012/06/13 12:51:28
    No, I'm not.
    Torchmanner ~PWCM~JLA
    People should worry more about AIDS, it is a pandemic.
  • Mike Hunt 2012/06/13 12:02:21
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Mike Hunt
    +1
    There is always "Shi*" in the water. The government puts it there.
  • Dagon 2012/06/13 01:53:13
  • Brian 2012/06/13 00:04:04
    No, I'm not.
    Brian
    +2
    Not in the least, this happens every summer. folks just need to brush up on their food handling practises.
  • Flash,aka,Mr.Lightning 2012/06/12 23:58:20
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Flash,aka,Mr.Lightning
    +2
    Watch what you buy,-wash everything and thoroughly cook.
    If you eat out look for any 'Popies' (Sinefield show).
  • Jessica 2012/06/12 20:09:18
    I'm not really sure
    Jessica
    Depends on if I plan to eat any food that I don't cook.
  • Mog of War 2012/06/12 19:32:46
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Mog of War
    Anyone who thinks we're not at risk has been lulled into a false sense of security. The fact of the matter is, Restaurants have often been having to pick up the slack for the FDA's shortcomings. The infection won't spread from person to person, but it will persist and escalate so long as we continue to under staff our food inspection jobs.
  • william keegan 2012/06/12 18:57:23
    No, I'm not.
    william keegan
    I will avoid locations that I would be susceptible to being infected..
  • Margaret Jacobson 2012/06/12 17:40:47
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Margaret Jacobson
    +1
    our FDA is understaffed, overworked, big ag contr ols EVERYTHING !! Only 6 states ?? how many times have you gotten a little sick on the stomach after dinner and take a tum,s or whatever ?? the runs ?? headache ??
  • jackie 2012/06/12 17:13:20
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    jackie
    I am always concerned. Its naive to not be concerned and to think nothing bad would ever happen to you... because those are the main people who get hurt.
  • FordCrews 2012/06/12 16:41:51
  • Groundskeeper Willy 2012/06/12 15:47:43
    No, I'm not.
    Groundskeeper Willy
    +1
    I garden and buy my beef and pork from local growers.
  • JERSEYDUDE 2012/06/12 15:45:36 (edited)
    I'm not really sure
    JERSEYDUDE
    thats what happens when our cows are fed corn rather than the grass theyre suppose to eat along with the absolutely disgusting conditions they live in
  • OneLastWord 2012/06/12 15:44:08
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    OneLastWord
    +2
    It's already in the White House for four years now, and no one has been able to eradicate it. Yet.
    dog
  • tebearc... OneLast... 2012/06/12 16:46:39
    tebearcalvary
    That didn't make any sense.
  • ticlo7 2012/06/12 15:04:13
    No, I'm not.
    ticlo7
    Because I'm not in the states.

    Still, I always take precautions anyway.
  • kraftymomma1979 2012/06/12 14:05:21
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    kraftymomma1979
    E. Coli is something to take very seriously.
  • Beate Zuernt 2012/06/12 10:06:18
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Beate Zuernt
    Infections are not so easy. If there are a lot of dangerous infections the immune system could collapse.
  • Chukroast 2012/06/12 06:52:08
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Chukroast
    I'm always on the lookout for E-Coli and Salmonella.
  • Annie~Pro American~Pro Israel 2012/06/12 06:19:09
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Annie~Pro American~Pro Israel
    Yes, I would like to know where it's coming from. I have allot of questions about this. Are we importing lettuce or, are we growing it here in America? If in America, where did this strain of E-Coli come from.... E-Coli is bad news and has the potential of killing allot of people, especially the very young, elderly and the debilitated.
  • Jiorgia 2012/06/12 05:31:41
    No, I'm not.
    Jiorgia
    We already take the necessary steps to prevent ourselves from E-coli in my household, I am not too worried.
  • beach bum 2012/06/12 04:39:28
    No, I'm not.
    beach bum
    no
  • redhorse29 2012/06/12 04:25:32
    No, I'm not.
    redhorse29
    Silly but no.
  • John Duffee 2012/06/12 03:17:41
    No, I'm not.
    John Duffee
    The general lack of oversight and protections against this sort of thing concerns me, but I'm not personally at risk for E. Coli.
  • AskZilla 2012/06/12 03:09:44 (edited)
  • Jiorgia AskZilla 2012/06/12 05:31:29
    Jiorgia
    humans.
  • OneLast... Jiorgia 2012/06/12 16:17:39
    OneLastWord
    +1
    Heres a big TMI:

    E. coli is a bacterium that lives in the intestines of humans and some other animals. The full name of the bacterium is Escherichia coli, and the average amount you excrete with feces every day averages between 100 billion and 10 trillion. In the sewage treatment industry, the amount of E. coli in water serves as an indicator for how polluted the water is—it indicates how much human feces is in the water. Basically, where there’s E. coli, there’s poo.

    E. coli is generally harmless to humans when it’s in the gut—it actually helps with digestion and gives us much-needed vitamins, like K and B-complex. The fetus of any animal is basically sterile, but as soon as an animal is born, it starts to acquire millions of types of bacteria that help it survive. These bacteria help us digest food and perform other essential tasks—and in truth, without bacteria in our bodies, we wouldn’t live very long.

    However, these bacteria are found only in areas of the body that come into direct contact with the outside world: the mouth, the intestinal tract, etc. If E. coli gets into the wrong areas of the human body, it can cause infections including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, peritonitis, and septicemia. These diseases can be treated using antibiotics.

    As you make your way thr...











    Heres a big TMI:

    E. coli is a bacterium that lives in the intestines of humans and some other animals. The full name of the bacterium is Escherichia coli, and the average amount you excrete with feces every day averages between 100 billion and 10 trillion. In the sewage treatment industry, the amount of E. coli in water serves as an indicator for how polluted the water is—it indicates how much human feces is in the water. Basically, where there’s E. coli, there’s poo.

    E. coli is generally harmless to humans when it’s in the gut—it actually helps with digestion and gives us much-needed vitamins, like K and B-complex. The fetus of any animal is basically sterile, but as soon as an animal is born, it starts to acquire millions of types of bacteria that help it survive. These bacteria help us digest food and perform other essential tasks—and in truth, without bacteria in our bodies, we wouldn’t live very long.

    However, these bacteria are found only in areas of the body that come into direct contact with the outside world: the mouth, the intestinal tract, etc. If E. coli gets into the wrong areas of the human body, it can cause infections including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, peritonitis, and septicemia. These diseases can be treated using antibiotics.

    As you make your way through the world, you are in constant danger of ingesting E. coli from the guts of other animals. They are found anywhere animals are found, so anytime you eat, drink, or touch something that has been near animals, you take the chance of picking up E. coli. Luckily, the usual strain of E. coli found in your gut is not dangerous when ingested; your stomach acids can kill it before it does any harm.

    However, there are more virulent strains of E. coli that can also cause sickness by producing toxic chemicals. These include the bacteria that cause food poisoning. It can be in meat, plants, or even drinks—there was a case in Canada where some contaminated unpasteurized apple juice killed a sixteen-month-old. Toxic E. coli bacteria can be fatal in children, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems, but for most of us, the worst it does is cause horrible vomiting and diarrhea.

    You may have also heard of E. coli when news of an outbreak in spinach crops came in October of 2006. This strain was more virulent than others, and it caused bloody stool, severe vomiting, and other unpleasant reactions. The outbreak was traced to pre-washed spinach served at the Sequoias Portola Valley retirement home in California. It spread to 22 other states and sickened 146 people, one of which died and 76 of which were hospitalized, many with kidney failure.

    Nobody is yet sure why there was E. coli in packaged spinach. But similar outbreaks in previous years have been caused by flooding. During flood seasons, sewage treatment plants often overflow, dumping thousands of gallons of untreated sewage into waterways. When the floodwaters reach farmers’ fields, it can contaminate the plants with that sewage. In this instance, scientists believe that the contamination could also have been caused by grazing deer or by fecal matter from nearby cattle in the water used for irrigation.

    E. coli is also often found in meat. It usually gets into meat while it’s being processed at the plant, as a result of an animal’s colon being punctured during the slaughter process. In general, E. coli is found only at the surface of a cut of steak—the inside should be sterile. This all changes, of course, if there’s a cut in the meat. Hamburger is particularly risky for E. coli contamination, because the surface has been mixed up with the inside during the grinding process. Cooking the meat all the way through effectively kills the bacteria, which is why you’re encouraged to cook your meat well-done to prevent food poisoning—and generally speaking, it’s safer to eat a rare steak than it is to eat a rare hamburger.

    http://www.professorshouse.co...

    No more
    (more)
  • OneLast... AskZilla 2012/06/12 16:18:04 (edited)
    OneLastWord
    Hears a big TMI:

    E. coli is a bacterium that lives in the intestines of humans and some other animals. The full name of the bacterium is Escherichia coli, and the average amount you excrete with feces every day averages between 100 billion and 10 trillion. In the sewage treatment industry, the amount of E. coli in water serves as an indicator for how polluted the water is—it indicates how much human feces is in the water. Basically, where there’s E. coli, there’s poo.

    E. coli is generally harmless to humans when it’s in the gut—it actually helps with digestion and gives us much-needed vitamins, like K and B-complex. The fetus of any animal is basically sterile, but as soon as an animal is born, it starts to acquire millions of types of bacteria that help it survive. These bacteria help us digest food and perform other essential tasks—and in truth, without bacteria in our bodies, we wouldn’t live very long.

    However, these bacteria are found only in areas of the body that come into direct contact with the outside world: the mouth, the intestinal tract, etc. If E. coli gets into the wrong areas of the human body, it can cause infections including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, peritonitis, and septicemia. These diseases can be treated using antibiotics.

    As you make your way thr...













    Hears a big TMI:

    E. coli is a bacterium that lives in the intestines of humans and some other animals. The full name of the bacterium is Escherichia coli, and the average amount you excrete with feces every day averages between 100 billion and 10 trillion. In the sewage treatment industry, the amount of E. coli in water serves as an indicator for how polluted the water is—it indicates how much human feces is in the water. Basically, where there’s E. coli, there’s poo.

    E. coli is generally harmless to humans when it’s in the gut—it actually helps with digestion and gives us much-needed vitamins, like K and B-complex. The fetus of any animal is basically sterile, but as soon as an animal is born, it starts to acquire millions of types of bacteria that help it survive. These bacteria help us digest food and perform other essential tasks—and in truth, without bacteria in our bodies, we wouldn’t live very long.

    However, these bacteria are found only in areas of the body that come into direct contact with the outside world: the mouth, the intestinal tract, etc. If E. coli gets into the wrong areas of the human body, it can cause infections including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, peritonitis, and septicemia. These diseases can be treated using antibiotics.

    As you make your way through the world, you are in constant danger of ingesting E. coli from the guts of other animals. They are found anywhere animals are found, so anytime you eat, drink, or touch something that has been near animals, you take the chance of picking up E. coli. Luckily, the usual strain of E. coli found in your gut is not dangerous when ingested; your stomach acids can kill it before it does any harm.

    However, there are more virulent strains of E. coli that can also cause sickness by producing toxic chemicals. These include the bacteria that cause food poisoning. It can be in meat, plants, or even drinks—there was a case in Canada where some contaminated unpasteurized apple juice killed a sixteen-month-old. Toxic E. coli bacteria can be fatal in children, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems, but for most of us, the worst it does is cause horrible vomiting and diarrhea.

    You may have also heard of E. coli when news of an outbreak in spinach crops came in October of 2006. This strain was more virulent than others, and it caused bloody stool, severe vomiting, and other unpleasant reactions. The outbreak was traced to pre-washed spinach served at the Sequoias Portola Valley retirement home in California. It spread to 22 other states and sickened 146 people, one of which died and 76 of which were hospitalized, many with kidney failure.

    Nobody is yet sure why there was E. coli in packaged spinach. But similar outbreaks in previous years have been caused by flooding. During flood seasons, sewage treatment plants often overflow, dumping thousands of gallons of untreated sewage into waterways. When the floodwaters reach farmers’ fields, it can contaminate the plants with that sewage. In this instance, scientists believe that the contamination could also have been caused by grazing deer or by fecal matter from nearby cattle in the water used for irrigation.

    E. coli is also often found in meat. It usually gets into meat while it’s being processed at the plant, as a result of an animal’s colon being punctured during the slaughter process. In general, E. coli is found only at the surface of a cut of steak—the inside should be sterile. This all changes, of course, if there’s a cut in the meat. Hamburger is particularly risky for E. coli contamination, because the surface has been mixed up with the inside during the grinding process. Cooking the meat all the way through effectively kills the bacteria, which is why you’re encouraged to cook your meat well-done to prevent food poisoning—and generally speaking, it’s safer to eat a rare steak than it is to eat a rare hamburger.



    http://www.professorshouse.co...

    No more.
    (more)
  • AskZilla OneLast... 2012/06/12 19:26:30
    AskZilla
    Can it cause gonorrhea?
  • TheEvilVampire 2012/06/12 03:01:22
    No, I'm not.
    TheEvilVampire
    Nah. Doesn't seem like its much to be concerned about
  • DizziNY 2012/06/12 02:46:43
    No, I'm not.
    DizziNY
    +1
    I don't eat anything that formerly had a face.
  • Louisa - Enemy of the State 2012/06/12 02:45:16
    No, I'm not.
    Louisa - Enemy of the State
    +3
    More people get sick from watching 'Jersey Shore' than from E. Coli.
  • WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA 2012/06/12 02:09:50
    No, I'm not.
    WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA
    +4
    Why worry?

    In this life there are only two things to worry about.
    Either you will be rich or poor.

    If you are rich, there is nothing to worry about.
    But if you are poor, there are only two things to worry about.

    Either you will be healthy or sick.
    If you are healthy, there is nothing to worry about.

    But if you are sick, there are two things to worry about.
    Either you will live or you will die.

    If you live, there is nothing to worry about.
    If you die there are only two things to worry about.

    You will either go to heaven or to hell.
    If you go to heaven, there will be nothing to worry about.

    If you go to hell, you'll be so darn busy shaking hands with all your friends,
    you won't have time to worry!

    SO WHY WORRY?

    Author Unknown
  • Sue 2012/06/12 02:06:21
    I'm not really sure
    Sue
    Considering that I just drove through nine states, the odds are good that I have been exposed.
  • Depp78 2012/06/12 01:54:20
    No, I'm not.
    Depp78
    We all walk around with this bacteria.
  • Chi~Cat 2012/06/12 01:50:36
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Chi~Cat
    +1
    AS the wildfires and voter fraud; it's a heavy list of chit. Wha?
  • Azrael-In GOD we trust 2012/06/12 01:41:52
    Yes, I'm concerned about it.
    Azrael-In GOD we trust
    +2
    I heard that there were some sickened by E Coli on the news.
    It's hard to tell where the poisoning came from. Did the folks wash all the produce before preparing their food?
    I wash everything, even potatoes that I peel, "already washed bagged salad" and anything that is food.
    It's good to wash off the tops of canned goods because rodents' urine and feces could have been on top of the cans in the warehouse.
    Perhaps someone who prepared the folks food did not wash their hands properly, or cross contaminated one food to another.
    Most of this can be prevented and one must remember that E Coli can be fatal.
    Whenever I go to restaurants, I refuse to eat raw veges, as in salads because I never know if the folks in the kitchens wash everything.

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