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Are College Graduates More Likely to Land a Job? (The Bureau of Labor Says So)

News 2012/06/06 13:00:00
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It's not exactly the best time to be getting out of college right now, with unemployment still hovering around 8 percent, but according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a college degree is better than nothing. Way better, in fact. They report just 3.9 percent unemployment among college graduates, compared to 8.1 percent among high school graduates and 13 percent among high school dropouts.

However, there's one major catch. That 3.9 percent unemployment for college grads does not include anyone under the age of 25, and according to Good.is, more than half of college graduates under 25 were unemployed last year. And while any employment is better than none, Good.is also notes that the Bureau doesn't specify what type of employment these grads are under. So what do you think, are college grads actually better off than those who never got a degree?


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  • Sour Dime 2012/06/06 18:47:00
    Yes
    Sour Dime
    +4
    Depends on what kind of field they are in I would guess, but it is always better to have more education than equal to or not enough.

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  • Savior 2012/06/06 14:22:12
    No
    Savior
    +1
    It really depends what they are studying, for example I don't think a degree in women's studies will be really necessary for finding a job.

    I'd say people who get into trades will probably find a job out of college. Also law students probably.

    We have large problems facing the work force for the next generation.

    First it will be getting smaller because the baby-boomers will be retiring.

    Second we have become so enchanted in getting a post-secondary education, i'm not saying people shouldn't be get a post-secondary education, it's just people shouldn't need to get post-secondary educations.

    Plus with post-secondary educations, less and less people are entering fields where they can get jobs right away. Less and less young people want to enter trades school, less and less people want to become mechanics, plumbers, electricians, etc. These fields are getting desperate, and the path to success in these fields will much easier. But those jobs have been portrayed to be subclass, and not up there with doctors, lawyers, executives, teaching or in the entertainment business. Which most of the careers are getting too much people.

    And finally universities offer so many useless classes. You don't need to study business to become a successful businessman, it helps but it's not ...



    It really depends what they are studying, for example I don't think a degree in women's studies will be really necessary for finding a job.

    I'd say people who get into trades will probably find a job out of college. Also law students probably.

    We have large problems facing the work force for the next generation.

    First it will be getting smaller because the baby-boomers will be retiring.

    Second we have become so enchanted in getting a post-secondary education, i'm not saying people shouldn't be get a post-secondary education, it's just people shouldn't need to get post-secondary educations.

    Plus with post-secondary educations, less and less people are entering fields where they can get jobs right away. Less and less young people want to enter trades school, less and less people want to become mechanics, plumbers, electricians, etc. These fields are getting desperate, and the path to success in these fields will much easier. But those jobs have been portrayed to be subclass, and not up there with doctors, lawyers, executives, teaching or in the entertainment business. Which most of the careers are getting too much people.

    And finally universities offer so many useless classes. You don't need to study business to become a successful businessman, it helps but it's not essential. This culture has become so obsessed with "higher learning," and I'm not trashing education, but when students are racking up $80,000 debts just to keep get a useless degree what's the point.

    Person A forgoes university, enters a trade. Finishes his education and gets a job immediately, he has a small student debt, but with the work he was doing while he learned he was able to pay it off. And 5 years after he graduates, he's saved enough money to open his own small business.

    Person B goes to university, studies drama. He doesn't find a job while in university, he uses student loans to pay for his education. After he gets his degree, he moves to Hollywood in search of acting roles, only to see more attractive and less educated people than him get roles he wants, he has a $60,000 debt and with no hopes in paying it off.
    (more)
  • Portholus Savior 2012/06/06 19:52:53
    Portholus
    Your examples are kind of skewered aren't they?

    I like your example with person A but you try opening a business. I knew of two people (one with a college degree) that were trying to start a business but getting the starting funds always did not pan out. One of the guys had even arranged for a 10 million dollar venture capital loan and it all fell through due to not having a specific signature. Opening a small business now is even hard and the costs are not as low as you might think and then the taxes tend to kill you.

    Now, your person B chose a degree in liberal arts (not computers, business, or the sciences) and then went to an area (hollywood) to try to practice their trade where the success rate is already against them by a LONG SHOT. It would take a lot of luck to make it big in hollywood.

    College may open doors but I still feel that the schools are trying to take advantage of the "free" tuition and the costs have skyrocketed WAY too much in comparison to what you get out of it. We are reaching the point where they are wanting Master's degrees just to compete in jobs but they do not want to pay what it would be worth to actually get the degree.
  • Lady-DeathBright 2012/06/06 14:19:18 (edited)
    No
    Lady-DeathBright
    It really depends on where they are. Like in WA, its a bitch to find a job.

    My father has a lot of school, couldn't get a job teaching at a community college here. He trys out of state, gets a job at University! AS TEACHER!
  • Mike J. Hirak 2012/06/06 14:04:52
    No
    Mike J. Hirak
    No, because a lot of employers won't hire people with outstanding loans. But they usually have a better career in the long run
  • Reichstolz 2012/06/06 13:55:07
    No
    Reichstolz
    If they are graduating with degrees that matter to the business community there is never a worry about finding employment. The issue resides with the "do nothing, know nothing" degrees.
  • BritPunk 2012/06/06 13:52:42
    Yes
    BritPunk
    +1
    At least I hope so! But I think degrees have been diluted by "mickey mouse" courses like media studies and so on.
  • John Galt jr or Ron/jon 2012/06/06 13:40:10
    No
    John Galt jr or Ron/jon
    +2
    compared to who?
    and what jobs?
    http://webstation19.8k.com/jo...

    What the statistics really say is they are not collecting unemplyment...
    Statistics http://webstation19.8k.com/ly...
    if you never had a job you can't collect...

    comjo statistics collecting unemplyment statistics httpwebstation19 8k comly job collect
  • Jack's Pearl 2012/06/06 13:38:28
    Yes
    Jack's Pearl
    +1
    Having that degree and education gives you a step up, even in rough times. I know mine has paid off.
  • starguide 2012/06/06 13:37:30
    No
    starguide
    i think more manual jobs can be found these days
  • Grabitz 2012/06/06 13:27:05
    No
    Grabitz
    +1
    No , most employees want someone ignorant that will do as they say without thinking about it .
  • Savior Grabitz 2012/06/06 14:25:23 (edited)
    Savior
    No it's because smart employers love competition, and when there's 50 applicants for a one man job (which is the case for most career fields nowadays), it's no surprise that 49 people are going to be turned down.
  • Callaway 2012/06/06 13:26:39
    Yes
    Callaway
    +1
    Looking at it over the long haul not immediately employment gratification yes if history is any indicator, however there is nothing guaranteed regardless of what you do. Employers look for people who have already hung in and finished projects and college is after all a project. With all the outsourcing of traditional jobs I frankly don't see where the better alternatives would be.
  • Kuruptsoul 2012/06/06 13:22:35
    No
    Kuruptsoul
    +3
    I find it humorous the amount of collage graduates I have worked with doing the same job and I was a high school dropout...
  • apacheh... Kuruptsoul 2012/06/06 16:52:51
    apachehellfire65
    +2
    i used to know a high school dropout that owned his own company. he used to love hiring college grads. just so he could laugh at how much they spent just to work for him!
  • Kat ♪ ~BTO-t-BCRA-F~ ♪ 2012/06/06 13:18:03
  • Reggie☮ 2012/06/06 13:15:40
    No
    Reggie☮
    +3
    No, many are not able to find a job in their career field.
  • mk, Smartass Oracle 2012/06/06 13:14:39
  • Franklin mk, Sma... 2012/06/06 14:39:58
    Franklin
    +1
    ...yea sure thing , all industry and economy started only after the first universities where built - what color is the sky on your planet ?...tell me again how the 6 weeks of collage made such an impact on Jobs that he could never have built apple with out it .....
  • mk, Sma... Franklin 2012/06/06 14:44:06
  • No
    Jersey Roze ♥Jwon's Cyar'ika ♥
    +4
    I don't think so. I watched this video on Youtube called " Why College Is a Scam". It was long, but worth it...
  • Dan ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮ 2012/06/06 13:12:09 (edited)
    No
    Dan ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +2
    The question should be "Are College Graduates More Likely to Land a Job Better than Flipping Burgers at McDonalds?"



    Probably only slightly better than a non-college graduate these days. You're better off working out of high school, getting into internships or trade schools, or starting your business.

    Exceptions include jobs like being a doctor or a lawyer, but it'll take a long time to pay off those loans with no garentee of sufficient employment once you leave college.
  • L1 2012/06/06 13:11:19
    No
    L1
    +1
    Not anymore..... plus it costs more to train people without experience.....
  • Kaimeso 2012/06/06 13:10:51
    Yes
    Kaimeso
    +4
    College degrees can help as long as the degree is not in some obscure field like textile design, etc,... But the real payoff happens a few years after getting that job, those with a degree will get faster promotions which means a lot more money and opportunity.

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