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85 Mile Per Hour Speed Limit in Texas: Approve?

Fef 2012/06/07 16:33:18
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The Texas Department of Transportation said today a toll road being built from San Antonio to north of Austin could be the first road in the country to have a posted 85 mile per hour speed limit.

"It was designed under extremely high design parameters," said Darren McDaniel, the Speed Management Director for the department, which builds and manages all Texas highways.Toll road two thirds completed runs from I-10 east of San Antonio to Georgetown, north of Austin

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  • BongRipper 2012/06/10 14:49:49
    Approve
    BongRipper
    Texas is the pioneer of road freedom.
  • Iamfree 2012/06/08 21:41:15
    Approve
    Iamfree
    Sounds great to me.
  • bob 2012/06/08 09:49:57 (edited)
    Disapprove
    bob
    +2
    The picture next to the title/headline of this question indicates an increase from 70mph to 85mph. That's a 21% increase in speed. I'm going to predict that, with this increased speed and attendant increase in fuel consumption, there will also be a comparable increase in the number and severity of accidents, injuries and deaths. The most tragic factor of ANY mva is that they are usually caused by the negligence and/or inattention of one individual, but create damage, injury and death to others who were doing nothing wrong. And, with increased speed, the amount and severity of this collateral damage also goes up, but at a rate greater than the increase in speed. (i.e. with a 21% increase in speed, the increase in number and severity of the accidents and fatalities will be greater than 21%).
  • jeepster4 bob 2012/06/08 19:56:10
    jeepster4
    +1
    Gee, that's a wonderful post. Now, dealing with reality, traffic already moves at a natural speed of around 80mph on open highways in Texas. Like most laws, this just confirms what already is happening and won't change anything. In fact, improvements in motor vehicles will cause the death rate to continue down, We heard all that pseudo scientific jargon when the speed limit nationally went up from 55mph. Guess what... the mpg and death rate continued to make a steady improvement.
  • bob jeepster4 2012/06/10 06:25:24 (edited)
    bob
    +1
    I don't know about any "pseudo scientific jargon" of which you speak. I do know from the reality of working for nearly 20 years as an X-ray technologist in various hospitals on both coasts. My experience and that of co-workers and other professionals in the hospitals where I worked can be summed up by telling you that, up to a certain speed, the severity of injuries suffered by mva victims increases almost exponentially until you reach the point where injuries are replaced by death.

    Sometimes we treated severely injured victims in the ER and they still died. Sometimes they died en route, bypassed the ER, and went directly to the morgue. And sometimes the bodies were bagged at the scene and were taken to the mortuary. Those we heard about from the Ambulance Drivers and Police Officers who had the unenviable job of being first on the scene.

    In virtually all cases, the biggest determining factor of how bad the injuries were was speed: the higher the speed, the worse the accident and associated injuries.

    Interestingly, though, a negative factor in injury severity is alcohol. A drunk driver (or passenger) is frequently LESS severely injured than other passengers in the same car or other cars involved in the same accident. The reason: drunk people are more relaxed at the momen...









    I don't know about any "pseudo scientific jargon" of which you speak. I do know from the reality of working for nearly 20 years as an X-ray technologist in various hospitals on both coasts. My experience and that of co-workers and other professionals in the hospitals where I worked can be summed up by telling you that, up to a certain speed, the severity of injuries suffered by mva victims increases almost exponentially until you reach the point where injuries are replaced by death.

    Sometimes we treated severely injured victims in the ER and they still died. Sometimes they died en route, bypassed the ER, and went directly to the morgue. And sometimes the bodies were bagged at the scene and were taken to the mortuary. Those we heard about from the Ambulance Drivers and Police Officers who had the unenviable job of being first on the scene.

    In virtually all cases, the biggest determining factor of how bad the injuries were was speed: the higher the speed, the worse the accident and associated injuries.

    Interestingly, though, a negative factor in injury severity is alcohol. A drunk driver (or passenger) is frequently LESS severely injured than other passengers in the same car or other cars involved in the same accident. The reason: drunk people are more relaxed at the moment of impact while people who are sober and aware of what's happening tend to tense up and, at the least, get more fractures of the long bones. (Being asleep when the accident happens can give the same results.)

    I suppose, if you wanted to, you could try to make the case that driving while drunk or asleep is safer than sober and alert.

    Your tale of driving 80 - 85 mph on the roads of West Texas and being passed by women in ranch pickups is interesting but hardly compelling. I've driven in rural, Upstate New York where rush hour consisted of three cars on the same 20 mile stretch of road at the same time. I've been in 5:00pm traffic on the George Washington Bridge going from Manhattan into New Jersey. That was when the National speed limit was 55mph, but God help the poor soul doing less than 70 in that traffic!

    I've had the same and similar experiences driving in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and I5 going through the San Joaquin Valley, as well as the freeways of the foothills of the Los Angeles Basin.

    Ditto Eastern Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana vs Portland, Or and Seattle, Wa.

    Granted, improvements in technology and design have improved gas mileage and the crash worthiness of more modern vehicles. But that doesn't change physics and the way the human body responds to the stresses and strains of an mva. And, all other factors being equal, the one thing you can count on is: More speed equals more injuries and deaths.
    (more)
  • jeepster4 bob 2012/06/10 20:14:52
    jeepster4
    "In virtually all cases, the biggest determining factor of how bad the injuries were was speed: the higher the speed, the worse the accident and associated injuries"

    So you walk and the rest of us will enjoy improve equipment and lowering death rates,even while speed of travel increases. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...
  • bob jeepster4 2012/06/11 09:32:16
    bob
    +1
    It's interesting the way you seem to view reality. My reasoning, summed up in the phrase "More speed equals more injuries and deaths.", is based on years of experience in the ER and discussions with first responders. You support your apparent assertion that improvements in auto design make it safer to go faster by referencing wikipedia. Yet you accuse me of relying on "pseudo-science".

    The data presented in the wikipedia article you reference correlates deaths, miles traveled and population. Two glaring flaws in using this data to support the claim that "it's safer to go faster" is that, 1) there is absolutely NO data about vehicle SPEED, which is the topic of this discussion; and 2) there is the caveat stated at the top of one of the tables: "The table does not include injuries resulting from accidents in which no fatalities occurred."; meaning it's not only not correlated to the topic, but also incomplete.
  • jeepster4 bob 2012/06/11 18:05:53
    jeepster4
    Trust me, I've researched the subject thoroughly. Ultimate safety is found at home in a comfortable chair. I can exchange tables with until you are blue in the face. The end result is always the same, I.E. travel speeds go up and death rates go down.
  • bob jeepster4 2012/06/11 23:23:33
    bob
    +1
    "Trust me. I know what I'm talking about."

    That's what we expect to hear from politicians.
  • jeepster4 bob 2012/06/12 00:27:00
    jeepster4
    I drove over 50,00 miles per year 0ver 41 of these United States for over 30 years in sales. I'm sorry, I just speak from experience in the real world for years.
  • bob jeepster4 2012/06/12 06:03:58
    bob
    Summary of our exchanges:

    Me: I predicted that increased speed will result in more severe accidents, injuries and deaths.

    You: Accused me of using pseudo-science. Claimed that reality shows that inreased speed resulted in decreased deaths.

    Me: I gave you my credentials and the experience from which I draw my conclusions.

    You: Restate my conclusion. Then restate yours. Then reference a wikipedia article.

    Me: After reviewing the article you cite as your authority, I point out that it's not even on-topic, much less supportive of your premise.

    You: "OK, ignore the data I cited. It's not important, now. Just trust me."

    Me: I make a somewhat snide reference to politiciations.

    You: Now reference your experience in sales, with over 1.5 million miles traveled.


    So now we're down to your experience vs my experience. And you expect me to believe and accept that your 30 yrs. and 1.5 million miles of driving experience as a salesman somehow trumps my 20 yrs. of ER experience dealing with the wide array of traumatic injuries, suffering and deaths caused by mvas, the severity of which was directly related to speed..... Sorry, that's not going to happen.

    Without apology, I claim my experience to be more valid than your experience. Yours can only claim that (apparently) in 30 yrs. and 1.5...

    Summary of our exchanges:

    Me: I predicted that increased speed will result in more severe accidents, injuries and deaths.

    You: Accused me of using pseudo-science. Claimed that reality shows that inreased speed resulted in decreased deaths.

    Me: I gave you my credentials and the experience from which I draw my conclusions.

    You: Restate my conclusion. Then restate yours. Then reference a wikipedia article.

    Me: After reviewing the article you cite as your authority, I point out that it's not even on-topic, much less supportive of your premise.

    You: "OK, ignore the data I cited. It's not important, now. Just trust me."

    Me: I make a somewhat snide reference to politiciations.

    You: Now reference your experience in sales, with over 1.5 million miles traveled.


    So now we're down to your experience vs my experience. And you expect me to believe and accept that your 30 yrs. and 1.5 million miles of driving experience as a salesman somehow trumps my 20 yrs. of ER experience dealing with the wide array of traumatic injuries, suffering and deaths caused by mvas, the severity of which was directly related to speed..... Sorry, that's not going to happen.

    Without apology, I claim my experience to be more valid than your experience. Yours can only claim that (apparently) in 30 yrs. and 1.5M miles, nothing bad happened to you. Mine demonstrates, beyond any doubt in my mind and the minds of those who shared or had similar experience, that people involved in car accidents get hurt. And the faster they're going when it occurs the worse the damage to the human body.

    I will stipulate that many salesmen might agree with you. But I will assert without hesitation that the majority of Hospital ER, EMT and Law Enforcement Personnel will echo my conclusion.
    (more)
  • jeepster4 bob 2012/06/12 17:32:08
    jeepster4
    Tell you what,you walk down to your er (watch out for slow moving drivers texting), and I'll continue to drive depending on local conditions and we'll both be happy.
  • Yuki ~ ... bob 2012/06/12 02:33:07
    Yuki ~ ♦Lion King of PHÆT♦
    It makes sense that the higher the speed, the more damage done by a crash, because the force of impact is greater. It also makes sense that the faster you're going, the faster you have to make snap decisions, and a slight mistake can result in an accident. And furthermore, a chance break-down, such as a wheel going out, will result in higher overall damage, due to all of the above factors: force of impact, others' ability to react to your situation as well as your own.
  • ed 2012/06/08 09:20:52 (edited)
    Approve
    ed
    all highways should raise the speed limit to 85
  • sjalan 2012/06/08 06:21:51
    Disapprove
    sjalan
    +1
    At 55 mph a car gets x miles per gallon.
    At 65 mph a car gets (x-13%) miles per gallon.
    At 75 mph a car gets (x-22%) miles per gallon.
    At 85 mph a car gets (x-39%) miles per gallon.

    If the person want to pay a toll so they can get 39% less miles per gallon Fine. Let them.
    BUT just remember most cars cannot travel a 85 mph for extended periods unless properly maintained AND has the correct tires on it. That single item should be enough not to allow this.

    BUT since it is a private toll road FEDERAL SAFETY LAWS DON'T APPLY.

    Frankly I think it is stupid.
  • ed sjalan 2012/06/08 09:24:03
    ed
    people don't care about how many miles to the gallon they get
  • sjalan ed 2012/06/09 00:02:15
    sjalan
    +1
    Well ya know even Mercedes Benz sells hybrids and Economical Diesels. Yes there are some who do care about MPG.
  • ed sjalan 2012/06/09 00:40:31
    ed
    I agree with you.
  • EdVenture 2012/06/08 06:21:29
    Approve
    EdVenture
    I would encourage 150+ statewide.
  • beach bum 2012/06/08 05:53:21
    Approve
    beach bum
    yes
  • JanHopkins 2012/06/08 05:25:33
    Approve
    JanHopkins
    +1
    Texas covers a lot of ground. At 55 MPH it would take forever to get where you need to go.
  • ed JanHopkins 2012/06/08 09:25:04
    ed
    +1
    just think about how long it took when we had no cars.
  • JanHopkins ed 2012/06/08 15:29:44
    JanHopkins
    +1
    I was thinking that very thing when I selected approve.
  • Jdogg 2012/06/08 05:24:26
    Approve
    Jdogg
    +1
    It seems most people are driving about 80 on the Interstate now.
  • ed Jdogg 2012/06/08 09:25:57
    ed
    very true
  • Raphy 2012/06/08 03:34:03
    Approve
    Raphy
    +1
    The only time I speed is when I'm running late for work or traveling. People are going to 90 on that road easily. Old people.....BEWARE. This not your highway to GO 60.
  • ed Raphy 2012/06/08 09:26:55
    ed
    old people ,young ones drive just as bad if not worse.
  • Raphy ed 2012/06/08 18:21:32
    Raphy
    +1
    Your right Nam Vet.......lol. Young people do drive reckless. Especially with this texting and driving. Sometimes I find myself doing it, an think to myself "what da hell are you doing, your driving fool."
  • ed Raphy 2012/06/08 21:11:40
    ed
    +1
    I agree and I think someone has now been charged for manslaughter because of texting while driving.
  • Raphy ed 2012/06/09 04:56:00
    Raphy
    +1
    Yeah, somebody has. It really is a bad habit.
  • Raymond Allamby 2012/06/08 03:23:47
    Approve
    Raymond Allamby
    +1
    that will be the only good thing about texas.
  • Fef Raymond... 2012/06/08 04:08:34
    Fef
    +1
    Texas has lots of freedoms
  • Jane Fef 2012/06/08 04:30:41
    Jane
    not really, unless you have plenty of money
  • Raymond... Fef 2012/06/08 10:54:11
    Raymond Allamby
    not really, but they do have lots of underpaid people.
  • Lerro DeHazel 2012/06/08 02:57:37
    Approve
    Lerro DeHazel
    +1
    I have ridden on the Nolan Ryan Express, before . . . But I never drove it. I only went as a Passenger . . . .You can really go very fast and still Texas Department of Public Safety Cars (Highway Patrol) will only pass you and never stop you for speeding. I have seen that already.
  • chgo 2012/06/08 01:35:25
    Disapprove
    chgo
    +1
    Gas prices are around $3.30 in Texas. Texas is a minimum wage state and they can't afford paying more in gas. They have the highest percentage of hourly paid workers earning the minimum wage or less in 2010.
  • Fef chgo 2012/06/08 04:09:14
    Fef
    +1
    Texas has way cheaper gas than California.
  • GettingBarried 2012/06/08 01:09:34
    Approve
    GettingBarried
    +1
    Cars nowadays drive comfortably at 85. It's no big deal. Really though there should be a minimum of say 65. Pass out the hefty fines to those hazards doing 50.
  • chgo Getting... 2012/06/08 01:37:12
    chgo
    Most Texas don't own or can afford to buy those type of cars that "nowadays drive comfortably at 85 [mph]".
  • Fef chgo 2012/06/08 04:10:33
    Fef
    really? Where did you get that statistic?

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