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Why is loving your country a requirement to live in it?

Quite a few people here take criticism to America personally. If you aren't praising it...why the hell aren't you packing your bags? I don't have any particular love for my country. It's nice enough, and I enjoy living here but I still don't feel like I owe any loyalty to it. It's land. What does it care? The 'move or love it' attitude is flawed in many ways, not least that it's extremely expensive and also that one has family ties in one's country of origin and such things.
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  • Philo-Publius 2010/05/13 19:59:45
    Philo-Publius
    +20
    You want to know what it is?

    These poor people have no substance of their own. They literally don't even exist. So, in lieu of personal substance and existential being, they find some vague notion wherewith to attach themselves, and THAT becomes 'them'. Thus, they are able to function, robotically instead of consciously, but nonetheless function.

    What's worse than this is, they have attached their entire being (or lack thereof) not to the more beautiful, subtle and sublime aspects of American philosophy (tolerance, liberalism, liberty) but to a flag or a word ('Merica).

    When you attack (or even indirectly suggest something contrary about) the flag, or the 'country' (whatever that is) which they have, literally, become, you are, literally, attacking 'THEM'. They cannot differentiate between 'self' and 'flag'. They are identical now to these and they don't even realize it.

    So, don't ever feel angry because of them. Feel SORRY for them for their lack of being and substance.

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  • Ves~Sailor Soldier of PHAET 2010/05/14 16:48:28
    Ves~Sailor Soldier of PHAET
    +2
    I'm with ya
  • Groucho 2010/05/14 14:40:26
    Groucho
    +4
    We, as Americans, do not claim to be flawless...far from it. But we do cherish the grand ideals and principles on which our nation was founded. Have we sometimes failed in our carrying out of these wonderful principles? Yes we have. The USA is a haven for all freedom loving people who care to be self sufficient and unemcumbered with massive government oversight. But there is a price for this liberty and many have paid with their lives to ensure that their loved ones and future generations worldwide can live in liberty. Our flag is viewed by some as merely a piece of cloth of a certain design. To me and many others it is a symbol of all that is good, noble, and honorable. The world would be under totalitarian rule today, ruled by a very few, had it not been for those in many freedom loving lands, not just America.
    I am an American and proud of that. I love my country and will defend it from all enemies, foreign and domestic. Freedom is NOT free.
  • BoredCo... Groucho 2010/05/14 16:52:26
    BoredCollieDogRIPmissDyouRmissed
    +1
    Well said groucho.
  • Saltwater Dude 2010/05/14 14:06:32
    Saltwater Dude
    +1
    I don't see loving or even liking our country a requirement to live in it. That may be one of our underlying problems that we probably can't change until we figure out a way to oust you. Until then STFU or you may find a size 11 boot interfering with the chomping of your microwaved hot pocket mommy keeps you stocked up with..
  • Gun665 2010/05/14 13:59:19
  • Max7 2010/05/14 13:56:32
    Max7
    +2
    I think that most people are grateful to be Americans., however, there are many residing in America, many born in America, where they don't feel that America has been that great to them. A lot of born Americans have had to struggle and fight for everything that they have, and because they are dismayed with how they have been treated, I don't feel that they should be packing bags and leaving. I think that the problem is equality, sometimes for many it's just a long time coming! Even in 2010. Many have not lived the lives of the elite!
  • Babel Fish 2010/05/14 13:52:07
    Babel Fish
    +3
    Oh nationalism, no you don't need to love a country because you live in it. I live in the Philippines as an ex-pat and world tourist. I love where I live, I love my partner, I like my friends and like the cheap economy but hate the corruption and the politics.
  • turtledove123 2010/05/14 13:28:22
    turtledove123
    +3
    I dont think you are required to love the country you live in, but you need to follow the laws and have respect. I love this country, but I recognize that it is not perfect. I will defend it and protect it, though. Flaws and all.
  • MrPKitty 2010/05/14 13:09:34
    MrPKitty
    +1
    Sheep are easily startled by any deviation in their normal routine and prefer to be lead blindly into their own demise than to explore the unknown on their own.
  • Walt 2010/05/14 12:15:36
    Walt
    +3
    Actually, there is a big difference between not loving America and what might appear to be "criticizing" it. Since the founding of America, we have enjoyed the right to complain about our elected officials. This is not recognized as criticism of America, but it is recognized as part of being a democracy and having the right to disapprove of anything one finds to be worth criticizing. One thing that is entirely unAmerican is branding anyone exercising his freedom of speech as disloyal. There is nothing more loyal than calling a situation the way you see it. Being able to do this and actually doing it helps insure that tyranny will not overtake our country.

    speech disloyal loyal calling situation helps insure tyranny overtake country
    Meekly letting the opposition trample all over us is not the American way and it is not patriotic.
  • Nauticaa Walt 2010/05/14 12:49:06
    Nauticaa
    +1
    I agree with you 100% which is why I'm so appalled at the treatment of the tea party.
  • Seeker-TERM LIMIT SUPPORTER 2010/05/14 11:52:19
    Seeker-TERM LIMIT SUPPORTER
    Well first your question is MISLEADING. I see you are from the UK. Americans love of country is different then others- simply because of our history.
    But its a question of its just LAND- its much much more then that.
  • bob 2010/05/14 08:35:57
    bob
    +2
    I think the term is more meant for foreigners that flee to foreign countries and start making a bunch of demands/whining to try and change that country to resemble the one they left.

    When foreigners seek asylum (or whatever excuse they use) in another country then that person should try more to change his/her ways to fit in instead of demanding that the country changes to fit him/her and how things were in their country.
  • [...] 2010/05/14 08:25:03
    [...]
    +3
    if someone cares to be a part of the USA and dont love it get out
  • Ves~Sai... [...] 2010/05/14 16:51:46
    Ves~Sailor Soldier of PHAET
    +2
    Uh no.
  • USAF Vet 2010/05/14 08:14:27
    USAF Vet
    +1
    If Philo-Publius's thesis is directed to legal citizens of this country, it's flawed. You can apply the Philo-Publius (translated: Loving Chief Man of the Island) theory to any country on the planet and his definition is unchanged; for that group of people, contrary to Philo-Publius, have a commons sense of nationality to their country, and flags to boot. He must has have synthesized the word “Merica”, I think he meant Myrica, the bark of the wax myrtle or barberry. He’s somewhat confused about the name we use to describe this country; He fails in his recollection of just how America received its name, (stolen of course if you’re a progressive) after the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci, as Great Britain (stole) its name from the ancient Romans (strange, both countries names have their genesis in some form of Italian history). Philo-Publius's marginalization of people, not of his mindset, who have love for their land, which probably is within a country, and a piece of cloth it represents, probably a flag, is wholesome drivel. P.S. Of course you owe no loyalty to any land; I presume you have the freedom to owe no loyalty to anything or anyone, just as Muslim women owe no loyalty to their husbands.
  • Master USAF Vet 2010/05/14 19:21:41
  • Kathy 2010/05/14 07:34:46
    Kathy
    +3
    criticism & constructive criticism are totally different things.
    I get mad and criticize things about America all the time, but if I didn't love my homeland I wouldn't take the time to speak out, Think about it this way Jehnyhal, we are the melting pot of the world. The Heinz 57, the mutts of the world. I'm Irish/French and proud of it. But do you really think Ireland or France cares about me? It's a pride about who you are, your roots, homeland. (I'm really not trying to preach to you, just explain how I feel about it:) Let me say this,, if I was in another Country and in deep trouble (abducted, held hostage) there is nobody I'd rather see than our Marines:)
    You don't have to like everything about America, but please don't sell her short. You might need her someday. And nobody has a right to tell you to leave your own Country:) That is what makes America great:)
  • ~Roxy~Navy~Brat~ 2010/05/14 07:18:33
    ~Roxy~Navy~Brat~
    +1
    it's not a requirement but why not love it...depending on where you live that is
  • Kari 2010/05/14 07:04:58
    Kari
    +6
    I've wondered this very thing before. Many people seem to take it extremely personally if you shed even a little light on one of America's negatives. I'm from America, but I also don't feel like I necessarily owe it something. I love my country. It's a beautiful place, and I miss home terribly. It's just where I feel natural, comfortable, and truly at peace. I currently live in Bangkok, Thailand. Before living here, I also lived in Japan. As someone who has lived abroad in more than one foreign country, I can say without a doubt, that I truly do not believe that America is the best country in the world. America has a lot of problems. The medical system here in Thailand, and also in Japan, is absolutely worlds superior than America. Thailand has been the best so far, regarding the medical system. Doctors will see you at absolutely any time. You can go to the hospital, say you want to see a doctor, and they'll set you up with someone in minutes. There's no such thing as having to make an appointment weeks or even months in advance here, and being turned away for whatever reason is unheard of. It's also much, much, much cheaper. I had an emergency cesarean section performed in a Bangkok hospital. I was so well taken care of by the doctors and nurses, and the total of my 4 day sta...

    I've wondered this very thing before. Many people seem to take it extremely personally if you shed even a little light on one of America's negatives. I'm from America, but I also don't feel like I necessarily owe it something. I love my country. It's a beautiful place, and I miss home terribly. It's just where I feel natural, comfortable, and truly at peace. I currently live in Bangkok, Thailand. Before living here, I also lived in Japan. As someone who has lived abroad in more than one foreign country, I can say without a doubt, that I truly do not believe that America is the best country in the world. America has a lot of problems. The medical system here in Thailand, and also in Japan, is absolutely worlds superior than America. Thailand has been the best so far, regarding the medical system. Doctors will see you at absolutely any time. You can go to the hospital, say you want to see a doctor, and they'll set you up with someone in minutes. There's no such thing as having to make an appointment weeks or even months in advance here, and being turned away for whatever reason is unheard of. It's also much, much, much cheaper. I had an emergency cesarean section performed in a Bangkok hospital. I was so well taken care of by the doctors and nurses, and the total of my 4 day stay, including medication, doctor fees, everything ... cost a total of 93,000 bahts. That comes out to about $2,800. I have friends back in the states that it cost around 15,000 dollars for the exact same thing. And, they typically stayed in the hospital in the states a day less than I was required in Bangkok.

    Yet, I still love my country, and usually wish I was back in Indiana. However, I'm not that naive, and ignorant to believe that America is superior to every country, in every way.
    (more)
  • Master Kari 2010/05/14 17:55:52
    Master
    +2
    Hehehe I'd be happier in Bangkok when they're rioting than I would be in the States when it's calm; figure THAT one out. Now there's a people who know how to protest. ;)
  • Kari Master 2010/05/15 06:50:22
    Kari
    Yeah, Thailand is definitely not perfect either. The riots really have not affected our day to day, since they tend to choose their spot to protest in, and don't seem to stray far from there. Many people have been affected though. The protesters are strangely kind however. We've seen them on the street a handful of times, and they always have big smiles on their faces, and are always pretty tickled when they spot our baby. This, of course, is always when they are not partaking in any protesting. We've really been hoping that this political unrest here hasn't soured some westerners on Thai people. In general, Thais are incredibly kind. There's a reason this country is called "The Land of Smiles." :)
  • Adam Troy 2010/05/14 06:05:52
    Adam Troy
    +3
    Hello:

    You don't have to love your country. You just don't have to hate the people that do. It's called "FREEDOM". They love, you hate. "Choice". Bye: Adam Troy
  • Nauticaa 2010/05/14 05:41:01
    Nauticaa
    +1
    I think the "love it or leave it" is focused in two directions - first at foreigners (or illegals) that move into our country and then expect Americans to change for them and to accommodate their culture when it is they who should be doing their best to mold into ours. I wouldn’t move into another country and expect the people there to change for me.

    And then second at people who really want to change this country into a socialist government vs. a capitalist society. Since there are many failing socialist countries many Americans are concerned and rightfully so about shuffling down that same tiresome path. But of this I’ll say no more because I don’t want to go off on a tangent.

    I love this country and I do feel a deep loyalty to America. But that is part of my nature for I feel the same way about the places I work and about my family and friends.

    And I am full of substance – thank you very much - as are most people who I know who care about what happens to the United States. There is nothing wrong with being critical of the country you live in – in fact you should speak out if you see injustice, oppression or abuses. And luckily in the United States you have the freedom to speak out against these offenses without fear of prison or death – unlike many other places.
  • USAF Vet Nauticaa 2010/05/14 08:23:39
    USAF Vet
    +1
    Thank you. I lived in England and Germany for many years, and believe me, the Brits and the Germans share the same sentiment as you and I. This 17 y/o twit for whom we have had the pleasure to read, is so misguided. So is Top Answer "Phillius-Pubicus-Skyhookinus...
  • Master Nauticaa 2010/05/14 18:05:05
  • soland 2010/05/14 05:36:40
    soland
    umm
    because why you there in it if you dont love it
    sounds fishy to me really
  • Jehnyha... soland 2010/05/14 14:18:53
    Jehnyhal~ Hope Not Hate~the Renaissance Women of PHAET
    +3
    That's just silly. In the vast majority of cases, you're there because you were born there, obviously.
  • soland Jehnyha... 2010/05/14 16:33:10
  • Jehnyha... soland 2010/05/14 16:48:54
  • Ves~Sai... soland 2010/05/14 16:54:42
    Ves~Sailor Soldier of PHAET
    +3
    Yeah because leaving is so easy. Saving up money, to buy a plane to move somewhere far away that you don't know if you would like it better. Spending even more money you would have to spend years to save in order to find a place to live and yadda yadda. You know after all that I don't think its that easy to just leave.
  • Master soland 2010/05/14 18:18:09
    Master
    +2
    maybe i would like to leave my country and move somewhere else but i cant because it would help if i was better educated because i learned everything i know in american schools and they didnt even teach me how to use proper punctuation and paragraph form and avoid run on sentences much less how to survive in the real world
  • Melizmatic soland 2010/05/14 18:51:43
    Melizmatic
    +1
    You're, not "your"

    SMH
  • Shilo soland 2010/05/15 00:31:06
    Shilo
    +1
    *She's* silly looking??? She's freaking adorable! You on the other hand, look like C-3PO with hair.
  • Melizmatic soland 2010/05/14 18:51:13
    Melizmatic
    +1
    Some people were stolen. They had no choice in being here. And now, after all this time, they dont belong in the country where their ancestors came from, either.
    So what are people like that supposed to do?

    people stolen choice country ancestors people supposed
  • soland Melizmatic 2010/05/15 02:27:00
    soland
    well they could find their roots and leave
    look if you dont like america
    get out
    thats how i see it
    if you are not willing to die for america
    dont be here
    go home and get out
  • Melizmatic soland 2010/05/15 03:27:20
    Melizmatic
    Yeah, like its really THAT easy to "find your roots" after 500 years.

    yeah roots 500 years

    SMH.
  • PetrifiedElephantPoop 2010/05/14 04:15:27
    PetrifiedElephantPoop
    +6
    Getting passports and jobs in the new locale can be frightening and expensive....They say moving is one of the most stressful things to do.
  • Ves~Sai... Petrifi... 2010/05/14 16:55:50
    Ves~Sailor Soldier of PHAET
    +3
    At least you and some others get it. If people could leave don't you think they would? Thats my thought on it. Its not like everyone can pack up their crap and just poof. It is stressful too. I have moved several times.
  • Anjirocks 2010/05/14 04:08:19
    Anjirocks
    +5
    I agree 100%!!

    Like you, I don't hate Scotland, I'll probably live here for the rest of my life, but it has its problems (especially now we have the Tories representing us, WTF). But even if I did hate it I was born here and have the right to stay.

    The same goes with America; it seems if someone says something negative they're told to get out, isn't the whole point of their "free speech" thing being able to voice their concerns in the hopes that they can be turned around?! If people are dissatisfied they have a right to say so.

    None of us got to choose where we were born, it's all just chance. Chances are we're going to be unhappy with at least one aspect of our society, no country is a Utopia.

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