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What kind of cheese is used in Mexican cheese enchiladas ?

Alfred 2011/02/14 18:22:05
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The real Mexican enchiladas not made with Wal-Mart ingredients.
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  • afterburn610 2011/02/14 18:27:47
    ...
    afterburn610
    +2
    Fresh Cheeses:
    Queso blanco:
    This creamy, white cheese is made from skimmed cow's milk, and has been described as being a cross between cottage cheese and mozzarella. It is traditionally coagulated with lemon juice, giving it a fresh, distinctive lemon flavor, although nowadays it is often commercially made with rennet. It softens when heated, but doesn't melt, and is a good choice for stuffing enchiladas.

    Queso fresco:
    A spongy white cheese, used to crumble over botanas - snacks - as well as on enchiladas and taquitos, this type of cheese was introduced to Mexico from Burgos, Spain. It is usually made with a combination of cow's milk and goat's milk. A very mild feta is an acceptable substitute for the grainy and mildly acidic queso fresco.

    Queso panela:
    Also called queso de canasta because it carries the imprint of the basket in which it is molded, this is a soft, white cheese most often served as part of an appetizer or snack tray. It absorbs other flavors easily, and is sometimes coated with a garlic-and-chile paste, or wrapped in toasted avocado leaves, to be served with cocktails.

    Requesón:
    A loose, ricotta-like cheese used to fill enchiladas and to make cheese spreads, this variety is most often sold in the markets wrapped in fresh corn husks. A mild - not sal...




































    Fresh Cheeses:
    Queso blanco:
    This creamy, white cheese is made from skimmed cow's milk, and has been described as being a cross between cottage cheese and mozzarella. It is traditionally coagulated with lemon juice, giving it a fresh, distinctive lemon flavor, although nowadays it is often commercially made with rennet. It softens when heated, but doesn't melt, and is a good choice for stuffing enchiladas.

    Queso fresco:
    A spongy white cheese, used to crumble over botanas - snacks - as well as on enchiladas and taquitos, this type of cheese was introduced to Mexico from Burgos, Spain. It is usually made with a combination of cow's milk and goat's milk. A very mild feta is an acceptable substitute for the grainy and mildly acidic queso fresco.

    Queso panela:
    Also called queso de canasta because it carries the imprint of the basket in which it is molded, this is a soft, white cheese most often served as part of an appetizer or snack tray. It absorbs other flavors easily, and is sometimes coated with a garlic-and-chile paste, or wrapped in toasted avocado leaves, to be served with cocktails.

    Requesón:
    A loose, ricotta-like cheese used to fill enchiladas and to make cheese spreads, this variety is most often sold in the markets wrapped in fresh corn husks. A mild - not salty - ricotta can be substituted for requesón.
    Soft Cheeses:

    Queso añejo:
    This is simply an aged version of queso fresco and, while classified as a soft cheese, can actually become quite firm and salty as it ages. It is used primarily as a garnish, crumbled or grated over a variety of dishes. Romano could be substituted for queso añejo.

    Queso oaxaca:
    Also known as quesillo, this is by far the most popular cheese for making quesadillas. It is a stretched curd cheese, kneaded and wound into balls. It should be pulled apart into thin strings before using to fill tortillas or melted on cooked food. Mozzarella or string cheese can be used in its place
    Semi-Soft Cheeses:

    Queso asadero:
    This is specifically a melting cheese, used to make the Mexican fondue called queso fundido, a dish which adapts well to the inclusion of a variety of ingredients and is usually eaten as a late-night supper. Fontina and Monterrey Jack are fine substitutes.

    Queso chihuahua:
    Also called queso menonita, after the Mennonite communities of northern Mexico that first produced it, this cheese is now made by both Mennonites and non-Mennonites all over the country. Unlike most Mexican cheeses, it is pale yellow rather than white, and can vary in taste from mild to a nearly cheddar-like sharpness. It is used in a wide variety of dishes, and is especially good for making queso frito, a breaded, fried cheese dish. Since Chihuahua cheese is widely sold outside of Mexico, it should not be necessary to look for substitutes, however a very mild cheddar or a flavorful jack cheese could replace it in many recipes.

    Queso jalapeño:
    A smooth, soft white cow's milk cheese with bits of jalapeño chile in it, this cheese is served as a snack or used to make quesadillas.
    Semi-Firm Cheeses:

    Queso criollo:
    This pale yellow cheese is a specialty of the region around Taxco, Guerrero, and is so similiar to Munster that the two can easily be used interchangeably.

    Queso edam:
    Although not considered a Mexican cheese, Edam has become such an intrinsic part of Yucatecan regional cooking that it is worth including here. The cheese round is scooped out, filled with a seasoned meat picadillo, and steamed in the oven in the same manner that a custard is prepared. This queso relleno is then presented whole, accompanied by a salsa roja.

    Queso manchego:
    Introduced to Mexico from the Spanish region of La Mancha, this buttery yellow cheese is popular outside of Mexico as well. It is good for melting, or for serving with fruit or crackers. Manchego is widely available north of the border, but Monterrey Jack is a good substitute.
    Firm Cheeses:

    Queso añejo enchilado:
    This is queso añejo, with a spicey red coating, which has been aged to the point where it serves as a condiment. A strong feta cheese could be substituted for it.

    Queso cotija:
    Named for the town of Cotija, Michoacan, where it originated, this is a sharp, crumbly goat cheese. It has been called "the Parmesan of Mexico" and is usually served over beans and salads.

    Queso manchego viejo:
    As its name indicates, this is manchego that has been aged to the point where it hardens and becomes more intense in flavor. It is quite often shaved over botanas
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  • Alfred afterbu... 2011/02/14 18:29:25
    Alfred
    +1
    Thanks.. I wasn't going to use a yellow cheese.
  • afterbu... Alfred 2011/02/14 18:30:50
  • Alfred afterbu... 2011/02/14 18:31:46 (edited)
    Alfred
    +1
    We're going to use queso oaxaca.
  • afterbu... Alfred 2011/02/14 18:51:48
    afterburn610
    +1
    sounds good

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