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Rihanna Defends Teen Suspended for Dyeing Her Hair Red: Rock on, RiRi or Butt Out?

Living 2012/05/10 18:00:00
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A 15-year-old girl who was suspended from school a week for dyeing her hair "Rihanna red" amazingly got a little support from the singer herself. "U are my hero Terry Bancroft!!!!! The color of your hair doesn’t change who u are, you are an A- grade student #1love," Rihanna tweeted.





Apparently, by the time RiRi sent her tweet on May 4, Terri (of north Wales) had already dyed her hair back to brown, after being told she would not be allowed back to the classroom until she returned to a more natural color, The Daily Mail reports.

While the A student was worried about her grades, she never expected to get support from one of the world's biggest pop stars. "Terri has been a little bit shocked and a little bit embarrassed. She found out from a phone call minutes after the tweet went up. She is a fan but she didn’t do it to copy her, it's amazing that she found out about it and tweeted about it," her mother Anne-Marie said, according to the Mail.

"The school put her in consequences because of her hair. It’s the room where they put naughty kids. She wasn’t allowed out on breaks, she had to be escorted to the dining room and was segregated from her friends." Do you think Rihanna did the right thing butting in? Or should Terri follow school rules?
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Top Opinion

  • Yaati 2012/05/10 17:43:17
    Rock on, RiRi
    Yaati
    +19
    I never got the whole freak-out about dying your hair 'unnatural' colours. It's a big deal at the school (I used to) go to as well. The excuse was always "it will distract other students!" Trust me. If I was sitting in the classroom looking at the back of some head that looked even as colourful as this:
    rainbow hair tumblr
    Yea, I'm sure it would amuse me for a class period or two, but then I'd get over it. Okay, so that's how they style their hair, what's the big deal? And if enough students were walking around with hair that way, no one would care and it's whatever.
    eye roll gif

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  • The Mosher 2012/05/11 04:25:09
    Rock on, RiRi
    The Mosher
    I don't like her but I think that girl shouldnt have been suspended no problem with what Ri said
  • L K 2012/05/11 03:27:35
    Rock on, RiRi
    L K
    +2
    Good for Rihanna. The color of the girl's hair shouldn't be an issue. If she follows school rules and keeps up her grades she should be able to color her hair any way she wants. If that is the worst thing she does as a teenager, then her parents are lucky!!
  • KoAm L K 2012/05/11 08:12:11
    KoAm
    >>>If she follows school rules>>>

    Well, one of the school's rules may have been that hair-dyeing isn't allowed.

    If that's the case, then she clearly wasn't following school rules.
  • L K KoAm 2012/05/11 12:16:03 (edited)
    L K
    +1
    I have taught school for 36 years. I have never seen that as a school rule. However, yes, you are correct. If she violated a rule that was in the school's and district's code of conduct handbook, and she signed the document (The legal paperwork we require to be signed by students AND their parents/guardians,) and we keep those papers on file in their student folders... then the school was within their rights, even though it could have been discussed and settled without suspension. If, there is more to the story and they had a legal obligation to go further than a reprimand, then that in itself another story, and rather fishy if you ask me. It is rare to take an A student and make an example out of them.. Right now, the only category I can figure this goes under is dress code. And there is nothing in any dress code that I am aware of that refers to hair. But, I would have to see the legal documents to give a better opinion. My youngest son, as a senior, was dating a girl who majoring in art and she had MANY colors died into her hair. I thought she looked ghastly, he on the other hand thought she was beautiful. They were both in gifted and advance placed classes and graduated with a 4.5 ( advanced placed classes give their A's 5 points rather than 4 since they get colleg...
    I have taught school for 36 years. I have never seen that as a school rule. However, yes, you are correct. If she violated a rule that was in the school's and district's code of conduct handbook, and she signed the document (The legal paperwork we require to be signed by students AND their parents/guardians,) and we keep those papers on file in their student folders... then the school was within their rights, even though it could have been discussed and settled without suspension. If, there is more to the story and they had a legal obligation to go further than a reprimand, then that in itself another story, and rather fishy if you ask me. It is rare to take an A student and make an example out of them.. Right now, the only category I can figure this goes under is dress code. And there is nothing in any dress code that I am aware of that refers to hair. But, I would have to see the legal documents to give a better opinion. My youngest son, as a senior, was dating a girl who majoring in art and she had MANY colors died into her hair. I thought she looked ghastly, he on the other hand thought she was beautiful. They were both in gifted and advance placed classes and graduated with a 4.5 ( advanced placed classes give their A's 5 points rather than 4 since they get college credit for them.) So I just let it go and as I figured by not making a big deal, they found other interests when they went to college. The school should have made a suggestion, and the parents should have enforced the decision. But, I think they went too far.
    (more)
  • Steampu... L K 2012/05/11 13:02:19
    Steampunk King
    +2
    At my school, we never signed any paperwork.
  • L K Steampu... 2012/05/11 13:12:30 (edited)
    L K
    +3
    Yes you did if you went to public school in the last 30 years. It is a nationwide law for public schools. All school districts have students and parents sign a code of conduct booklet, which now includes a media release form ( so photos or videos can be used since most schools have computers and video cameras., along with papers to let parents decide if their child can attend a human sexuality class at the end of the school year.) All the basic forms are sent home the first week of school and have to be returned by the week after they are given out. The students go over the code of conduct booklet the first week of school each fall, plus see closed circuit TV videos made by high school students, to explain the rules. If the students and parents don't sign the paperwork, then the students have zero rights. For instance, if a child wants to have class pictures taken for the yearbook but didn't sign a media release form, they can't have it done. The schools don't want law suits over anything since money in schools is short. This is mandatory procedure in all public schools. It protects the schools and also the students. The school have to protect themselves from parents who sue over everything and also protects students from bullying as well as defining the dress and behavior code of the district. This is one way how sue happy parents have changed the school system for the worse....
  • Steampu... L K 2012/05/11 13:15:17
    Steampunk King
    +1
    Nope. I never did. I'm pretty sure I'd remember. We go over the code of conduct, but we never sign anything.
  • L K Steampu... 2012/05/11 13:26:14 (edited)
    L K
    +1
    At the end of the code of conduct booklet there is a paper for parents to sign. Usually they have a student signature too. But as long as parents sign it, then all is well. In any event, if the code of conduct was covered and in the teacher's or school's plans and it is documented, then students are legally and morally bound to abide by the rules in the code of conduct booklet. That is the law. I just retired after teaching 36 years. I was also the head of the school advisory board and the Union representative for my school. So trust me on this. That being said, hair color is not normally part of any dress code I have ever seen. I would think the girl's parents can fight this. Unless the school discussed this with the girl and her parents first and she defied them or did something else. I would have to see the paperwork on this to determine exactly what happened. I just read about it online and their policies were posted on line about hair colors. So she had no right to die her hair. Silly, but the rules. http://www.azcentral.com/offb...
  • Steampu... KoAm 2012/05/11 13:01:15
    Steampunk King
    +1
    Not everyone knows every school rule.
  • L K Steampu... 2012/05/11 13:21:46 (edited)
    L K
    +2
    Do you go to public school? If so, you had to. If it is private schools and you are a minor then your parents had to sign paperwork. Schools don't want to be responsible for certain issues and have parents sign documents to make sure everything they do is legal. OR, the schools post their rules on a website that is accessible for all to see.
  • Steampu... L K 2012/05/11 18:02:15 (edited)
    Steampunk King
    I go to public school, neither I nor my girlfriend signed any papers about rules.
  • L K Steampu... 2012/05/11 19:50:41
    L K
    +1
    But you went over the code of conduct....that was then documented by the staff and so you are held responsible for everything in it.
  • jerry.a... L K 2012/05/13 01:04:24
    jerry.alan.carroll
    +1
    dude is not gonna admit he is wrong. i graduated in 1991 and i know every year in high school at least I signed that form. I too went to a public school.
    in middle school we reviewed it in the very first class. taking that class was the same as signing any form. We were told to review at home as we as we were to be held responsible for our actions.
  • L K jerry.a... 2012/05/13 03:56:31
    L K
    You are right. Thanks!!!
  • Marcus Clark 2012/05/11 03:24:59
    Butt out
    Marcus Clark
    +5
    If a student breaks the school's rules, they are subject to the prescribed punishment.
  • Robert 2012/05/11 03:10:03
    Rock on, RiRi
    Robert
    +1
    See at my school it's not a problem. A student dying their hair is protected under the first amendment. Just look at Tinker vs. Des Moines
  • L K Robert 2012/05/11 13:22:39 (edited)
    L K
    Yes, while a school might have a dress code, hair is not usually part of that code of conduct.
  • Robert L K 2012/05/14 19:41:32
    Robert
    +1
    Exactly. I Think that one may wear whatever they want in school as long as it covers their body and as long as it doesn't hurt or discriminate. If it causes a disruption, i personally believe that other peoples immaturity should not limit ones freedoms.
  • ♣♦Benevolent Punk♥♠ 2012/05/11 03:08:04
    Rock on, RiRi
    ♣♦Benevolent Punk♥♠
    So what, her hair was red? That shouldn't make her suspended. Far from it.
  • Couri 2012/05/11 02:48:39
    Rock on, RiRi
    Couri
    +1
    The exact same thing happened to me when I was in school. My hair was blonde with a couple pink streaks. There was nothing said specifically in the code of conduct but it fell under the "left up to the principles discretion" part. They told my mom the same thing about it being distracting and my mom told them "If your students are distracted by something as trivial as pink hair, maybe they should be put in a more "special" class."
  • Anjali Shah 2012/05/11 02:13:56
    Rock on, RiRi
    Anjali Shah
    +3
    It's HER hair... not the school's. Rihanna did something pretty awesome to support her. Plus, at our school, it's pretty tolerable... there's a few girls with "rihanna red" hair.
  • Karl 2012/05/11 02:13:04
    Rock on, RiRi
    Karl
    +1
    I understand that this is in Wales, but I have to wonder about the people who honestly don't understand why schools are failing.
  • XSummerX Tokio Hotel Freak(= 2012/05/11 02:07:45
    Rock on, RiRi
    XSummerX Tokio Hotel Freak(=
    +2
    That's so stupid, it's her hair none of the schools damns business.
  • DFA 2012/05/11 02:02:48
    Rock on, RiRi
    DFA
    +5
    Oh no! somebody looks different!!!
  • Osaka 2012/05/11 02:01:06
    Rock on, RiRi
    Osaka
    +1
    Why would someone get suspended for dying her hair red? Though I have heard of students being bullied by teachers because of unnatural hair colors but suspension is ridiculous.
  • _Ganjaa 2012/05/11 01:59:02
    Rock on, RiRi
    _Ganjaa
    now i like her a little bit more
  • Andrea 2012/05/11 01:56:18
    Butt out
    Andrea
    +6
    Here's to showing kids that even celebrities think it is ok to break the rules and expect to have them cater to HER whims.
  • Robert Andrea 2012/05/11 03:11:46
    Robert
    But that's just it, the courts have said that your first amendment right is protected in school. I know in my school a girl doing this is perfectly okay. - it adds a layer of diversity and individualism
  • Marcus ... Robert 2012/05/11 03:22:53
    Marcus Clark
    Coloring one's hair has nothing to do with the 1st Amendment.
  • Robert Marcus ... 2012/05/14 19:44:18
    Robert
    coloring ones hair has to do with 1st amendment because speech also includes symbolism, clothing, one's body, and basically anything that involves expression. And i guarantee you, the courts have and will uphold it.
  • Andrea Robert 2012/05/11 12:24:58
    Andrea
    +2
    Your First Amendment rights do not include breaking school or work dress codes.
  • Robert Andrea 2012/05/14 20:04:39
    Robert
    Work dress code is okay because one has the CHOICE to work that job.

    Students like myself, don't get to decide if we want to go to school or not. In school the dress code should always be- wear clothes that appropriately cover ones body, and also to wear clothing that is not discriminating or harmful. Clothing that is a disruption is something that people have to deal with. Just because of other students immaturity keeps them from being focused, doesn't mean that ones rights should be limited.
    Freedom of speech includes clothing, symbols, words, speech (obvi.), tattoos, signs, posters, handouts, hair, art, objects- Anything that expresses an idea is freedom of speech. And this has been upheld by the courts.

    This is why, i personally, am against public schools with uniforms or any other tight limitation- mostly because no where has uniforms improved a students academics.
  • Andrea Robert 2012/05/19 02:33:57
    Andrea
    You do have a choice actually. If you do not like the rules, go to private school and wear a restrictive uniform.
  • ☥☽✪☾DAW... Robert 2012/05/11 17:27:07
    ☥☽✪☾DAW ☽✪☾
    Same Bible, Different Verdict On Gay Marriage
    http://www.npr.org/2012/05/11...
  • lmnlme10921 2012/05/11 01:50:42
    Rock on, RiRi
    lmnlme10921
    +2
    I think it's cool that Rihanna would support her, but the girl was right for coloring her back to a natural shade. I'm all for self-expression, but when you go to a school you agree to follow their rules. She had to have known beforehand that her school did not allow colors like that, and did it knowing the consequences. The school did go a little bit too far, basically setting up segregation. At my school you get a warning, and if you don't dye your hair back by a certain time, then they take action. I like the color though; maybe she could dye it back that way in the summer.
  • Somkey the Hores 2012/05/11 01:47:04
    Rock on, RiRi
    Somkey the Hores
    +2
    What's it to a school if someone wants to look like a clown? Then again, it IS a big deal in the totalitarian socialist UK.
  • Mariann... Somkey ... 2012/05/11 10:30:38
    Marianne723
    +1
    LOL BOZO RED.
  • Little Miss Monster 2012/05/11 01:44:12
    Rock on, RiRi
    Little Miss Monster
    +1
    I'm not much of a fan of Rihanna but I do think it was admirable and very nice what she did because she didn't even have to acknowledge the girl the way she did. I was actually very touched.
  • Emelin Martinez 2012/05/11 01:39:06
    Rock on, RiRi
    Emelin Martinez
    +1
    Well thats some BS im in high school and i have dyed my hair multiple times. i fact right now my hair is Green with a bit of blue on my bangs.
    other students dont get distracted by me in class, they ask me question sometime on their free time or what not, but its not a distraction in class.
    your hair color doesnt change who you are, its just a physical trait.
  • cddjmikey 2012/05/11 01:36:24
    Rock on, RiRi
    cddjmikey
    +2
    So I guess no redheads go to this school ? In highschool one of my sisters changed her hair color on a monthly and sometimes weekly basis depending on how she felt at that time. The whole"punk" thing was going on over here. The school never cared and neither did my parents. They told her as long as she kept her grades up she could go rainbow with her hair for all they cared. If they dropped however, back to natural. She kept changing it till it wasn't cool anymore. This girl is an A student. She makes them look good with her grades so they SHOULD try to keep her happy I would think.

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