Quantcast

PUBLIC OPINION > Kids Under 13 Should Not Be on Facebook

SodaHead Living 2012/06/06 22:00:00
Though Facebook doesn't allow kids under the age of 13 to register on the site, surveys have shown that many of them sign up anyway. That's why Facebook is developing a way to let younger kids make a Facebook account through their parents' account. That way their parents can keep a close eye on it and even control certain elements of the site, such as who their kids are friends with, and youngsters won't have as much reason to set up their own. We wanted to know how the public feels about this.

sodahead kids facebook

Sorry, kids, but the public has spoken. Even with parent-monitored accounts, most people think kids under 13 should stay off Facebook. The primary fear is simple: Online predators. Chris Hansen can't put them all away, and though reports of children actually meeting online predators are very rare, one instance is one too many.

Teens Stand Up for Tots

Age was certainly a factor, but it didn't turn out exactly how we expected. Most age groups only showed about 18%-23% support for allowing kids on Facebook, but two groups voted differently. Teens were the most permissive, presumably because they're closest in age to the kids we're discussing. But the 35-44 group was also oddly permissive.

Women Don't Want Kids Online

Female voters were a little bit more concerned about allowing younger kids to have Facebook accounts. Women do tend to be the nurturing ones, and we could also point out here that, based on what we've seen from "To Catch a Predator," there aren't very many female online predators on the prowl.

Liberals Might Let Them

The political spectrum played out pretty much how we expected: Liberals are a little more lenient, while conservatives were a little more protective. Liberals embrace new technology and new ideas, while conservatives are hesitant to head in that direction. Both approaches are necessary to ensure a safe, civilized society.

If you'd like to vote on this question, dig deeper into the demographics, or engage in existing discussion about the topic, visit our poll about kids on Facebook. We'd love to hear from you!
You!
Add Photos & Videos

Top Opinion

  • aibohphobia 2012/06/06 23:01:05
    aibohphobia
    +5
    I don't really think they should, because it's against Facebook's TOS. Also, most of the people that would be on it would say incredibly stupid crap, and there is already enough of that on facebook.

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • Vieuphoria 2012/06/07 13:23:38
    Vieuphoria
    +1
    But if they are... I will find them.
  • kirstie 2012/06/07 12:14:52
    kirstie
    +4
    they soudnt be on i got taken off for butting in
  • Deyabe Dezy 2012/06/07 11:06:59
    Deyabe Dezy
    +1
    of course no been untrust on facebook of kids ...
  • jamiecooper187 2012/06/07 09:59:33
    jamiecooper187
    +3
    facebook isnt dangerous, ignoring yor children and not talking about how to be safe with strangers is dangerous
  • Youssef Said 2012/06/07 09:22:21
    Youssef Said
    +1
    They can use facebook
  • billie 2012/06/07 08:46:12
    billie
    +1
    let them do as they please. it's their faults for anything facebook-related.
  • ♥♥♥AznGurl92♥♥♥ 2012/06/07 08:28:23
    ♥♥♥AznGurl92♥♥♥
    +3
    to me personally, i dont think kids under 13 should be using facebook
  • Lady Katze 2012/06/07 08:16:19
    Lady Katze
    +1
    I get it, because when I was 11, I thought Facebook was a really big deal for a while. Now? I do not really care anymore. So as long as they know the do's and dont's of the internet, then let 'em at it.
  • Emily Barrington 2012/06/07 06:38:36
    Emily Barrington
    +1
    If there mother let's them and they have been given the talk about peados, Stalkers, only except realy 'friends', ect. Then yeah go ahead.
  • aerica bennett 2012/06/07 05:41:49
    aerica bennett
    +1
    yea i guess if they are responsible enough
  • Christo... aerica ... 2012/06/08 06:11:59
    Christopher Kirchen
    +2
    But the whole point is that they usually AREN'T.
  • Arianne 2012/06/07 04:51:58
    Arianne
    +1
    We'll I'll be honest I know HEEPS of people on FB who are younger than 13, and have been there for a while. Of course their parents also tend to moniter their accounts but still. So if they're going to do it anyways at least in this case since it's linked to their parents accounts their parents can monitor them. Its preferable to them just signing up anyway and their parents not being able to effectively monitor it.
  • White Wolf 2012/06/07 04:41:28
    White Wolf
    +1
    I don't think kids that are under 13 should be on Facebook. Sometimes its a pretty dangerous place... some people on Facebook just can't be trusted.
  • GirlyAngel<3 2012/06/07 04:25:05 (edited)
    GirlyAngel<3
    +3
    NOOOOOO! The epidemic of 12 years old behaving like 16 year old thrash is already overwhelmingly grand! They don't need Facebook, they need coloring books and playdough!
  • AllyAnne 2012/06/07 04:15:04
  • Idc anymore 2012/06/07 03:02:23 (edited)
    Idc anymore
    +3
    I do not think little kids under 12 or 13 should be aloud on there
  • Bill 2012/06/07 02:35:12
    Bill
    +1
    Younger than 13,I think its a bad idea.Kids that age don't really understand what they're doing!(the old adage with age,comes wisdom is true!)
  • Rhi-ot. 2012/06/07 01:56:59
  • CielPha... Rhi-ot. 2012/06/07 02:46:12
    CielPhantomhive.BN-0
    +1
    Why do you say that?
  • Defcon 2012/06/07 01:42:18
    Defcon
    +1
    Tracking users after they log out and violating US wiretapping laws – these are the allegations behind a 15-billion-dollar nationwide class-action lawsuit filed against Facebook in California.
    The suit, combining 21 cases of alleged privacy violations by the social networking giant, was filed on Friday in the Federal Court in San Jose, Emil Protalinski writes on ZDNet.com. In their consolidated complaint, the plaintiffs claim that Facebook used cookies to track them across the Internet.
    And yet, where does the staggering sum of the lawsuit come from? Violation of the Federal Wiretap Act provides suggests compensation of US $100 per day per user for every case of violation, up to a maximum of US $10,000 per user. The accusations also fall under the Computer Fraud and Abuse act, the Stored Communications Act, as well as various California Statutes and California common law.
    “This is not just a damages action, but a groundbreaking digital-privacy rights case that could have wide and significant legal and business implications,” said David Straite, a partner at Stewarts Law. The firm is one of the plaintiffs leading the claim.
    Accusations that Facebook used cookies to track its users even after they log out are countless. However, all such claims have been turned down so far on th...

    Tracking users after they log out and violating US wiretapping laws – these are the allegations behind a 15-billion-dollar nationwide class-action lawsuit filed against Facebook in California.
    The suit, combining 21 cases of alleged privacy violations by the social networking giant, was filed on Friday in the Federal Court in San Jose, Emil Protalinski writes on ZDNet.com. In their consolidated complaint, the plaintiffs claim that Facebook used cookies to track them across the Internet.
    And yet, where does the staggering sum of the lawsuit come from? Violation of the Federal Wiretap Act provides suggests compensation of US $100 per day per user for every case of violation, up to a maximum of US $10,000 per user. The accusations also fall under the Computer Fraud and Abuse act, the Stored Communications Act, as well as various California Statutes and California common law.
    “This is not just a damages action, but a groundbreaking digital-privacy rights case that could have wide and significant legal and business implications,” said David Straite, a partner at Stewarts Law. The firm is one of the plaintiffs leading the claim.
    Accusations that Facebook used cookies to track its users even after they log out are countless. However, all such claims have been turned down so far on the grounds that cookies are simply not legally considered to be wiretaps. Proving damage is also a challenge here.
    In September, the Data Protection Commissioner (DPC) in Ireland, where Facebook has its international headquarters, agreed to conduct a privacy audit of the network’s activities. Interestingly enough, and thankfully for Facebook, the three-month audit concluded that the company makes “innovative use of cookies to identify unusual or suspicious activity” on an account.
    As for now, Facebook insists "this complaint is without merit" and prepares to "fight it vigorously" – PCWorld quotes Andrew Noyes, the network's manager of public policy communications.
    (more)
  • AngelaDuke 2012/06/07 01:41:55
  • Squish-Squish 2012/06/07 01:29:15
  • melissa Squish-... 2012/06/07 01:38:46
    melissa
    +3
    My dad won't even let my mum have one.
  • Squish-... melissa 2012/06/07 02:06:52
    Squish-Squish
    +1
    Well then he's being a good husband, trying to protect his wife. I mean it is a little overprotective but that's how it is when you love someone.
  • Jen melissa 2012/06/07 13:01:17
    Jen
    +1
    That's kinda ridiclous. If she's trustworthy she can do whatever she wants within reason.
  • Ant Jen 2012/06/08 02:11:17
    Ant
    +1
    Not if her husband has a problem with it. I know it seems wrong to you that she is submitting to her husband but if keeping her off Facebook is the worst example of him being controlling, she is one blessed woman. It could be a whole lot worse than that.
  • Bibliop... melissa 2012/06/07 18:29:19
    Bibliophilic
    +1
    That's controlling. She's an adult!
  • xxxhear... melissa 2012/06/12 03:29:59
    xxxheartbreakerxxx
    I would not let my husband give me restrictions. I am entitled to my own to do what I want. If you disagree, thats fine. This is a opinion not a fact as I see some people don't understand that.
  • mark 2012/06/07 01:10:57
    mark
    +2
    A huge no on that one.
  • ed 2012/06/07 00:20:01
    ed
    +1
    no but it would be nice if they had a site just for them .
  • M. Aronson ed 2012/06/07 02:00:09
    M. Aronson
    +2
    Nam, I think there are already those kinds of sites, but meant only for kids. The problem, as always, is that it's impossible to monitor who's signing up. An adult can pass themselves off as someone of any age they're looking for.
  • Triniti 2012/06/06 23:51:24
    Triniti
    +4
    No they shouldn't just like they should not be on here either, to many adults and adult questions, real bad idea..
  • KittyKat 2012/06/06 23:07:33
    KittyKat
    +4
    I think a Facebook jr. would be alright but other than that no! Keep them perverts out!
  • M. Aronson KittyKat 2012/06/07 02:00:54
    M. Aronson
    +2
    But, KittyKat, how can you make sure that the perverts aren't posing as kids???
  • KittyKat M. Aronson 2012/06/07 03:07:39
    KittyKat
    +1
    Good question. People will do anything these days.
  • aibohphobia 2012/06/06 23:01:05
    aibohphobia
    +5
    I don't really think they should, because it's against Facebook's TOS. Also, most of the people that would be on it would say incredibly stupid crap, and there is already enough of that on facebook.
  • L K 2012/06/06 22:51:41
    L K
    +5
    Why not make a Facebook junior and let kids under high school age go there. I agree they should have a social network which would keep them out of trouble, but they don't belong on sites with adults.
  • Party o... L K 2012/06/06 23:08:18
    Party of One
    +3
    good idea! very good idea ;)
  • Nezkeys79 L K 2012/06/06 23:28:54
    Nezkeys79
    Just out of curiosity why would you not include everyone up to the age of 18 on the junior site? since the law says we are all children until 18?
  • L K Nezkeys79 2012/06/07 12:14:59
    L K
    +1
    It could be up to 18. I was just thinking that many teens in high school might be mature enough to be on the regular Facebook site. I don't have a problem with high schoolers, just the elementary and middle school kids. Technically, though, you are right. When Facebook first started my son was in high school and set up his FB account for college. Then Myspace was the rage but he knew in college FB was the thing. And if I judge others on his maturity, they I am fine with high school kids on the site.

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

Living

2014/04/18 18:31:14

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals