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PUBLIC OPINION > Constantly Surfing the Web Can Give You Mental Disorders

Living 2012/07/19 23:00:00
A recent study conducted at the University of Gothenburg suggests that constantly being online -- that includes being connected through your phone -- can make you develop mental disorders such as stress, sleep disturbances and depression. It sounds plausible, but we wanted to know if the public buys it.



Most people agree that constantly being connected to the Internet can make you develop mental disorders, but it was hardly unanimous. Many were skeptical of how the study was conducted, arguing that "mental illness seems a great stretch." However, it does seem like a logical conclusion. With only personal and second-hand experience to go by, most people believe being online constantly could very well lead the mind to darker places.

Teens Can Tell

If anyone knows the ill effects of being online every second of every day, it's teens. They were practically born online. They're on Facebook, they're on their smart phones, they're taking online classes, they're Googling the name of that guy who starred in "Rudie" and played Samwise in "Lord of the Rings" (it's Sean Astin.) Is it driving them crazy? They submit that it is.

Irrelevant to the Unemployed

Usually, older voters and full-time workers vote similarly. Likewise, younger voters, students and the unemployed vote similarly. But not here. Full-time workers, like teens, are convinced being online constantly can develop mental illness. Our guess is that full-time workers, also like teens, are online constantly for their jobs. It's hard to clock out when work follows you home.

Agnostics Are Going Crazy

Interestingly enough, religion correlated strongly here. As usual, atheist and Christian voters responded differently, with atheists feeling the being online could, in fact, make you develop mental illness. However, atheists didn't have the most extreme response. Rather, agnostics were some of the strongest believers... in Internet illness, that is.

If you'd like to vote on this question, dig deeper into the demographics, or engage in existing discussion about the topic, visit our poll about online insanity. We'd love to hear from you!
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  • Leo Dupuis 2012/11/27 15:47:34
    Leo Dupuis
    +10
    I think it depends on what kind of surfing. I find my stress level goes up when I do research and down when watching music videos. And I feel it depends on a persons personality type.

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  • ahumblevoter 2012/07/20 22:59:21 (edited)
    ahumblevoter
    +3
    The internet also causes sperm loss.
  • Kozmo 2012/07/20 18:45:19 (edited)
    Kozmo
    +1
    Things are best in moderation. I'm either a panthiest or deist & I find it "fascinating" that those inclined to believe in institutionalized folklore are falling for an unreal IMAGE.

    Here's an article about us becoming Sheeple &/or Hu·bots.

    FRIDAY, 30 MARCH 2012
    Could our society be contributing to the rise in autism rates?
    According to recent news reports, the number of school children classified as being autistic has risen by 56% in the last 5 years.

    This is an enormous number, and controversy is raging over whether the rise is due to parents pushing for a diagnosis to gain extra resources for a child showing only mild traits or if there is an environmental cause for such a dramatic rise.

    Studies have indicated that the criteria for autism is now so broad that other developmental disorders (for example language developmental disorders) which, several years ago, would have been diagnosed separately, now meet the criteria for autism.

    The widening of the criteria for autism indicates that there is no organising idea behind the understanding of the condition. From the human givens perspective, we would suggest that what we term 'caetextia' ('context blindness' a chronic disorder manifesting in the inability to adjust behaviours or perception to deal appropriately with interacting varia...








    &







    Things are best in moderation. I'm either a panthiest or deist & I find it "fascinating" that those inclined to believe in institutionalized folklore are falling for an unreal IMAGE.

    Here's an article about us becoming Sheeple &/or Hu·bots.

    FRIDAY, 30 MARCH 2012
    Could our society be contributing to the rise in autism rates?
    According to recent news reports, the number of school children classified as being autistic has risen by 56% in the last 5 years.

    This is an enormous number, and controversy is raging over whether the rise is due to parents pushing for a diagnosis to gain extra resources for a child showing only mild traits or if there is an environmental cause for such a dramatic rise.

    Studies have indicated that the criteria for autism is now so broad that other developmental disorders (for example language developmental disorders) which, several years ago, would have been diagnosed separately, now meet the criteria for autism.

    The widening of the criteria for autism indicates that there is no organising idea behind the understanding of the condition. From the human givens perspective, we would suggest that what we term 'caetextia' ('context blindness' a chronic disorder manifesting in the inability to adjust behaviours or perception to deal appropriately with interacting variables) is the organising idea behind autism and Asperger's.

    The reason for the rise in autism is probably due to a number of different factors, however there is a possibility that, in addition, the set up of our current culture is actively favouring the development of both left brained and right brained autism (what we term 'right brained caetextia').

    As we discussed in a previous post, in Silicon Valley, the technological centre of the USA, there has been a threefold rise in children diagnosed with autism in just a decade.

    In the same way, it is possible that in our society as a whole, we are inadvertently encouraging both left brain and right brain autism.

    Here is a quote from Godhead: The Brain's Big Bang, explaining the premise behind this idea:
    "Another factor favouring autistic behaviour in today's workplace is the growth of overly prescribed working practices that remove personal responsibility from people in public services. The management style in HM Revenue & Customs, and agencies focused on education, health, policing and law, suit those who are context blind. (For a person with caetextia, 'responsibility' is just a buzzword - without multiple processing abilities, their attempts to be responsible often lack common sense, which after all is just another way of saying, 'seeing the bigger context'.)

    Alongside the growth of working conditions that favour people with left-brained caetextia, the media may be encouraging right-brained caetextia by randomly generating fantasies and continually stimulating imagination in ways that make it harder for people to stay in touch with reality. Vast numbers now pay a disproportionate amount of attention to emotionalism in music, television, 'reality' shows, computer games and on-screen interaction with one another in ways the inhibit the development of apathy skills and the ability to read multiple contexts. Characters in soap operas become real for them, artificially constructed celebrities infiltrate their mental landscape, and online 'relationships' divorced from empathic face-to-face communication, mimic psychotic symptoms to become delusional substitutes for genuine friendships (which involve mutual understanding and getting innate needs met.)

    Although both types of caetextia occur in society, there is no widespread understanding of what is required for people to hold the middle ground: the flexibility of thought that arises from having equal access to imagination and reason. If we continue to create the conditions that favour both left-brained and right-brained caetextia, either by means of the media saturating the population with emotionalism, or by subjecting people to overly systematised, computer-controlled and rightly prescribed working environments, without valuing the middle position, the end result might be that the window of opportunity for us to evolve further will slam shut."

    For more on this topic and references for the above passage, please see the book Godhead: The Brain's Big Bang.

    http://blog.humangivens.com/2...
    (more)
  • warrior 2012/07/20 18:43:26
    warrior
    +5
    its funny most the unemployed people said no,because the spend all day on the computer
  • Kozmo warrior 2012/07/20 18:49:21
    Kozmo
    Pan·irony & Denial
  • America... warrior 2012/07/22 19:26:57
    AmericanVirus
    +1
    All it takes is a basic understanding of mental disorders to know that it has nothing to do with being on the internet all day. If some screws are loose in your head, it's because they were never tight to begin with.
  • Inquisi... America... 2012/07/23 16:54:40 (edited)
    Inquisitve Kat
    ...But anyone with a basic understanding of mental disorders knows that mental disorders can be developed, even if you're entirely 'normal' in the first place.
  • Inquisi... warrior 2012/07/23 16:53:11
    Inquisitve Kat
    What makes you so sure of that?

    When I was unemployed, I spent much LESS time on the computer. I'm inclined to think your type of employment might really influence how often you're on the computer. A lot of workers spend a significant portion of their work-day online.
  • TEPP 2012/07/20 18:11:59
    TEPP
    Yeah kinda. I had insomnia for quite a while, but I'm getting better at going to bed.
  • overdog001 2012/07/20 18:03:00
    overdog001
    Their cause-and-effect is backwards.

    For example: getting run over by cars doesn't make one wander out into traffic. Wandering into traffic makes one get run over more often.
  • Kozmo overdog001 2012/07/20 18:52:52 (edited)
    Kozmo
    +1
    You forgot about drivers distracted by texting or using the phone.

    Double if neither party's paying attention.

    Would be ironic if a driver ran over someone he was chatting with at that moment (giving directions to meet?).
  • overdog001 Kozmo 2012/07/20 21:33:42
    overdog001
    +1
    Good one. I wish there was a way to compile a list of 'em!
  • Kozmo overdog001 2012/07/20 21:51:37
    Kozmo
    +1
    There are, check out the Darwin Awards.
  • john doe 2012/07/20 17:37:54
    john doe
    +2
    Too much of anything can be bad for you, the Internet is not the problem.
  • Kozmo john doe 2012/07/20 18:53:14
    Kozmo
    Even water: Polydipsia
  • cheryl.keene.98 2012/07/20 17:28:08
    cheryl.keene.98
    +2
    I think it's more likely that lazy people become lazier. When you start neglecting other areas of your life like work, chores, sleep and relationships it becomes like an addiction which in my opinion is a mental disorder.
  • Kozmo cheryl.... 2012/07/20 18:59:09
    Kozmo
    We need "here & now" contact with each other to maintain health. We're social animals & many find 'Solitary' unbearable.
    This 'virtual socializing' (Isaac Asimov [RIP] called it 'viewing' in "The Robots of Dawn")
    is devoid of Human Contact much like processed food is devoid of proper nutrition.
  • Squatch 2012/07/20 17:16:44
    Squatch
    +2
    Sounds like a Chicken or Egg thing to me. Is your life so mundane that all you do is sit at a computer - i.e. Your life is the problem. OR Does sitting at the computer actually cause the problem - Who knows???
  • Kozmo Squatch 2012/07/20 19:01:11
    Kozmo
    It's US! I've posted the article above but here's the link if you're not bothered to scroll.

    http://blog.humangivens.com/2...
  • Squatch Kozmo 2012/07/20 19:10:23
    Squatch
    Interesting Article. I have not really looked at prevalence studies from other countries, but it does seem to be reported much more in the USA. Thanks for the insight.
  • Kozmo Squatch 2012/07/20 20:18:56 (edited)
    Kozmo
    Here's another one, looks like the Boss is Dilbert Seinfeld:

    http://lornemitchell.com/blog...

    It would appear that organisations can also demonstrate the symptoms of caetextia (or context-blindness). Organisational Caetextia (or OC as we will call it from now on) can help us understand why some organisations exhibit a sort of madness when dealing with their customers and employees – yet give us a clue as to why they remain blind to the significant consequences of acting in such a crazy way.
    In cases of caetextia in individuals, the new research has uncovered two types of context blindness – and OC can also be observed in two distinct types of dysfunctional behaviour. Before we look at these two types, though, it is worth looking in more detail at the part of the brain that allows us to process context.
    The research has also uncovered two types of Caetextia: front-of-brain or straight-line thinking blindness and back-of-brain random association blindness. What is interesting is that these types of caetextia can also be applied to organisations and can help us understand why some organisations are so disconnected.

    The first type can be called “Process OC”. This is where an organisation processes work in logical straight lines without taking into account the wider organisational impli...





    Here's another one, looks like the Boss is Dilbert Seinfeld:

    http://lornemitchell.com/blog...

    It would appear that organisations can also demonstrate the symptoms of caetextia (or context-blindness). Organisational Caetextia (or OC as we will call it from now on) can help us understand why some organisations exhibit a sort of madness when dealing with their customers and employees – yet give us a clue as to why they remain blind to the significant consequences of acting in such a crazy way.
    In cases of caetextia in individuals, the new research has uncovered two types of context blindness – and OC can also be observed in two distinct types of dysfunctional behaviour. Before we look at these two types, though, it is worth looking in more detail at the part of the brain that allows us to process context.
    The research has also uncovered two types of Caetextia: front-of-brain or straight-line thinking blindness and back-of-brain random association blindness. What is interesting is that these types of caetextia can also be applied to organisations and can help us understand why some organisations are so disconnected.

    The first type can be called “Process OC”. This is where an organisation processes work in logical straight lines without taking into account the wider organisational implications of doing so. This type of OC is fixated in the front of the brain. Examples might be a call centre agent who does not know which person or department to hand-off someone to and simply puts them into a telephone black hole. Another example might be an agent who says “I am really sorry that this has happened to you, I will get someone to ring you back” – and they never do.

    Organisational Caetextia of the process type tends to happen lower-down organisatons (for instance someone in the back-office saying: “that’s not my job, I only process this type of transaction”. Front line workers will often be encouraged to adopt to this type of thinking with phrases such as “You are not paid to think. Just do what I say”. This dysfunctionality is exacerbated by outsourcing arrangements where the supplier organisation fulfills its minimum service level obligations and is very much driven by the mantra “if it is not in the contract, then I can do it, but it will cost you more”.

    The second type “Informational OC” tends to be found higher-up in organisations. This type of OC is based in the back of the brain. The symptoms of this type of organisational madness is driven by managers and “leaders” defining a whole world of information they need to run the business that is of very litle value other than to those managers holding their jobs down or playing the politics of the given day. Often the amount of information needed expands without any understanding on the cost associated with gathering it. The information is then dressed up as targets to “motivate” those lower down the organisation to stretch themselves to meet those targets and get a bonus. Vast parts of the organisation chase numbers that have no bearing on the reality of what is actually happening to customers on a day-to-day basis.

    In times of stress, the information will often be used to create random associations between the data sets, coming to rapid conclusions to reinforce otherwise illogical assumptions and then finding it rather difficult to justify their decisions after the event. The whole saga of justifying Weapons of Mass Destruction in Iraq is a good example of this. Organisations also use such pools of information to get rid of people lower down in the organisation who are not “conforming”… even if the data bears no resemblence to reality and the people are doing valuable work with customers.
    (more)
  • ahumble... Kozmo 2012/07/20 23:01:51
    ahumblevoter
    +1
    You probably got one of those disorders in the time it took you to write that
  • Kozmo ahumble... 2012/07/21 08:07:38 (edited)
    Kozmo
    Note the weblink above the article? I was BORN with it over 50 years ago, the word "caetextia" was only coined 5 years ago.

    For the (individual) Psychology version, consult caetextia.com, for familial or communal level, you can find exaggerated depictions on any sit-com.
  • ahumble... Kozmo 2012/07/21 15:33:11
    ahumblevoter
    +2
    Lighten up. Please? :)
  • Kozmo ahumble... 2012/07/21 18:11:48
    Kozmo
    It's my innate obsessiveness, if I 'spot' (& I'm more observant than most for the same reason) a mistake or oversight & the other ignores or dismisses it, I go ballistic (Asperger's).
  • marandia 2012/07/20 16:11:12
    marandia
    it doent cause mental disorders...and it doent causee cancer....however it can contrbute to you going blind. you blink less when your looking at the screen. something like once every 5 minutes....
  • Catalin Paraschiv 2012/07/20 15:51:15
    Catalin Paraschiv
    +1
    constantly being online means also that you change real life with a virtual one
    maybe sometimes real life is ugly, but virtual life it is only a lie
  • Max Power Catalin... 2012/07/20 17:52:52
  • Kozmo Catalin... 2012/07/20 19:05:09
    Kozmo
    It's not much different that Soap Opera fan getting more involved with the show than real-life.

    Can happen to actors too. Heard Michael Dorn (ST-NG) reported that the Worf persona almost took him over.

    BEWARE! Don't let your Groove become a Rut.
  • suomynonA 2012/07/20 15:48:06
  • jackolantyrn356 2012/07/20 15:12:03
    jackolantyrn356
    +1
    Our Marxist Masters in the White House hate it when there is an informed public>>>>>>>>So they put drivel like this out.
  • Kozmo jackola... 2012/07/20 19:06:13 (edited)
    Kozmo
    +1
    doesn't matter if YOU'RE ignorant already.
  • Squatch Kozmo 2012/07/20 19:12:33
    Squatch
    +1
    jackola... says it all!
  • Doctor 2012/07/20 14:47:20
    Doctor
    I DON'T BELEAVE IT! OH THIS STRESSES ME OUT IM...*yawn* oh never mind it's not worth it. I wish I could sleep...
  • Big Battles 2012/07/20 14:43:52
    Big Battles
    I dont see it :\
    they would already had to have been driven crazy in order to be crazier on the web... Sane people are Safe.
    as for people becoming crazy... thats what families are for
  • Kozmo Big Bat... 2012/07/20 19:07:58 (edited)
    Kozmo
    But what if they spend all their time glued to the screen?

    Re: Sports Widows.
  • Big Bat... Kozmo 2012/07/21 03:11:19
    Big Battles
    hm... I may have to think about that.
  • Kozmo Big Bat... 2012/07/21 08:14:34
    Kozmo
    Or always have an I-pod or cell grafted to their skull, à la the Borg.
  • Big Bat... Kozmo 2012/07/21 12:14:38
    Big Battles
    well, an iPod could get away with it because they are just listening to tunes, and cell phones they are talking to explain why they cant make it to wherever on time (or chatting with pals) so they could potentially get away with that too.
  • Kozmo Big Bat... 2012/07/21 15:17:50
    Kozmo
    Meant that the entire family is 'elsewhere' even at home so no one talks & the household gets even more dysfunction over time or problems keep festering.
  • Big Bat... Kozmo 2012/07/22 00:45:09
    Big Battles
    +1
    thats the correct answer I guess

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