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Police will be able to see through walls with a WIFI router. Good or bad?

Daryl 2012/07/24 22:09:00
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Wi-Fi radio signals are found in 61 percent of homes in the U.S. and 25 percent worldwide, so Karl Woodbridge and Kevin Chetty, researchers at University College London, designed their detector to use these ubiquitous signals. When a radio wave reflects off a moving object, its frequency changes—a phenomenon called the Doppler effect.

Their radar prototype identifies frequency changes to detect moving objects. It’s about the size of a suitcase and contains a radio receiver composed of two antennas ­and a signal-processing unit. In tests, they have used it to determine a person’s location, speed and direction—even through a one-foot-thick brick wall. Because the device itself doesn’t emit any radio waves, it can’t be detected.

Wi-Fi radar could have domestic applications ranging from spotting intruders to unobtrusively monitoring children or the elderly. It could also have military uses: The U.K. Ministry of Defence has funded a study to determine whether it could be used to scan buildings during urban warfare.

Police will be able to see through walls with a WIFI router. Good or bad?

Read More: http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-07/s...

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  • princess 2012/07/31 08:13:57
    Bad
    princess
    I know where this is leading.
  • Red_Horse 2012/07/28 09:29:27
  • AlexTheDrummer 2012/07/26 16:55:14
    Bad
    AlexTheDrummer
    +1
    I enjoy my privacy, thank you.
  • thermoguy 2012/07/26 06:15:03
    Bad
    thermoguy
    +1
    Could be anything moving and there are more considerations with wireless. If the frequencies go through walls, they go through you and cause nerve and muscle stimulation. The frequencies are also impacting structural integrity of buildings and fire separations. Be careful with that one.
  • john Kills 2012/07/25 21:06:38
    Bad
    john Kills
    +1
    If I find the police spying on my family using this or any other technology, I will kill them. Badges don't mean good guys anymore.
  • starlight 2012/07/25 15:25:28
    Bad
    starlight
    +1
    oh no big brother to the max if theres a limit!
  • JDreDaCookieMonster 2012/07/25 11:09:09
  • mewycg 2012/07/25 08:10:09
    Bad
    mewycg
    +1
    Ooooooh the stuff they're gonna see...
  • Jrogers 2012/07/25 06:27:52
    Bad
    Jrogers
    +2
    We better make sure this doesnt happen in this country - it would be a huge invasion of privacy
  • Don Leuty 2012/07/25 05:42:15
    Bad
    Don Leuty
    That meas use a shotgun instead of solid round weapon.
  • Gregaj7 2012/07/25 05:02:21
    Bad
    Gregaj7
    If you think your graphic is the only way that technology will be used.....
  • thefatguy 2012/07/25 04:42:50
    Bad
    thefatguy
    +1
    A clear violation of search and seizure.
  • eliosc 2012/07/25 01:56:49
    Bad
    eliosc
    +1
    Unless you are a sheep.
  • overseanancy 2012/07/25 01:30:55
    Bad
    overseanancy
    +1
    Bad for privacy and ONLY good for fighting crime
  • RobHom 2012/07/25 00:23:33
    Good
    RobHom
    Actually....I really don't care....if they are so bored that they want to watch me...meh, so what?
  • Chris D 2012/07/25 00:05:06
    Good
    Chris D
    +2
    Good and Bad- If there a a guy behind that wall who is about to kill people that is good....If the police are spying on citizens - that is bad
  • Mr.Hoodz the Truth Troll 2012/07/24 23:27:42
    Bad
    Mr.Hoodz the Truth Troll
    Chalk another one up to the "conspiracy theorist".
  • Fef 2012/07/24 23:21:48
    Good
    Fef
    I hope they can shoot through the walls too.. save lots of policemen's lives.
  • Debowman 2012/07/24 22:49:55 (edited)
    Bad
    Debowman
    +2
    It's not legal

    The Supreme Court announced the following rule: “when . . . the Government uses a device that is not in general public use, to explore details of the home that would previously have been unknowable without physical intrusion, the surveillance is a “search” and is presumptively unreasonable without a warrant.” Because infrared temperature sensing was not in “general public use,” the thermal imaging was a “search” that required a warrant. There are several ways to justify the “general public use” limitation on the result in Kyllo. Perhaps the idea was that if a technology is widely used by the public, it is not longer reasonable expect that it won’t be used. This reflects what I have called the probabilistic model of Fourth Amendment protection, and is hinted at in footnote 6 of Kyllo. Alternatively, perhaps the Court was trying to square the result in Kyllo with cases going back to the 1920s that that had allowed the police to use flashlights.


    see Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27 (2001) also see
    United States v. Lee, 274 U.S. 559, 563 (1927); United States v. Dunn, 480 U.S. 294 (1987)
  • Anthony Souls 2012/07/24 22:45:33
    Bad
    Anthony Souls
    However, it wouldn't work if there were no wireless signals being transmitted in the area, so I gather. And seems it would be prone to jammers or obfuscation :P

    Take care,
  • Christine/Rest in peace Pet... 2012/07/24 22:44:18 (edited)
    Bad
    Christine/Rest in peace Peter Br
    +3
    A man's home is supposed to be his castle, unless they have a court warrant giving them permission to search for a specific item. With modern technology we have the problem of balancing the rights of privacy and to be secure in one's home, secure in our private property, and secure against unreasonable search and seizures. There is less and less respect for personal space and privacy by the government, and by losing our individual rights to a big brother government, they are distroying the very things that this country was founded on, and what made our country so exceptional.



    Think about living in a world where there is no where to hide from cameras, no where to go where you know you are not watched, and no secrets personal or otherwise from big brother. Is that a fair exchange for a piece of security from events most Americans are not likely to ever be victims of? And still, with losing all of our rights and personal security, our safety can not be guaranteed each time we walk into a building, or get on a plane. I rather live my life free, then caged by watchful eyes even in my own home.
  • Dave Sa... Christi... 2012/07/24 23:06:13
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    +2
    I already live in a world where God sees everything, so I am not worried.
  • Bad
    Jerry (Iron Priest)☮ R ☮ P ☮ 201
    +6
    We have a Constitutional right to privacy. This will be the last straw.
  • BlueRep... Jerry (... 2012/07/24 23:12:50
    BlueRepublican
    +1
    We USED to have a Constitutional right to privacy Jerry. Patriot Act changed all that.
  • Pele Emerging 2012/07/24 22:36:50
    Bad
    Pele Emerging
    +2
    I don't know about anyone else, but I don't trust the government to use such a device only for 'good.' Also, if the government has it, what's going to stop the 'bad' guys from getting it and also using it?
  • Joe Shwingding BN-ZERO 2012/07/24 22:25:12
    Bad
    Joe Shwingding BN-ZERO
    +2
    more big brother
  • Soot The Fallen 2012/07/24 22:24:46
    Bad
    Soot The Fallen
    +2
    What i do in my room is private THEY NO STEAL MY WIFI EITHER!
  • Dave Sa... Soot Th... 2012/07/24 23:07:16 (edited)
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    There are about 6 WiFis detectable from my room - only one of them is in my house.
  • MadAsHEck Dave Sa... 2012/07/24 23:11:28 (edited)
    MadAsHEck
    over 20 in the Mobil Home Park where I live. Us old folks are more up to date than some of you young whippersnappers think. :))
  • Soot Th... Dave Sa... 2012/07/24 23:13:47 (edited)
    Soot The Fallen
    I get like 13 that arnt from my house. only 2 of the 14 i recive are pasword protected x3 one is ours the others is our nehibor across the street
  • Aahz_OneAndOnly 2012/07/24 22:24:41
    Bad
    Aahz_OneAndOnly
    They already use FLIR systems to "observe" those of interest.
  • the judgebigdogeagle-~PWCM~JLA 2012/07/24 22:24:23
    Bad
    the judgebigdogeagle-~PWCM~JLA
    But they still need a search warrant.They just can't eve drop on your internet.
  • Aahz_On... the jud... 2012/07/24 22:25:44
    Aahz_OneAndOnly
    They produce there own signal.
  • the jud... Aahz_On... 2012/07/24 22:34:07
    the judgebigdogeagle-~PWCM~JLA
    How do I say this. Picking up your signal ,is the same as if they walked on your property,and saw something like illegal drugs on your table,through the window. They cannot bust in without a search warrant.
  • Aahz_On... the jud... 2012/07/24 22:59:56
    Aahz_OneAndOnly
    I agree, this is a bad thing. The new tech is that they produce their own signal to "observe".
  • Dave Sa... the jud... 2012/07/24 23:09:03
    Dave Sawyer ♥ Child of God ♥
    Your signal is just floating around in the air. If it comes to you, how is that invasive?

    If they can see drugs on your table through your window from the sidewalk, it is fair, though?
  • MadAsHEck the jud... 2012/07/24 23:13:03
    MadAsHEck
    +1
    If you have your network protected with a SSID Key, they cannot penetrate the firewall without a lot of searching to find the key.
  • Jaiheena Star 2012/07/24 22:20:30
  • Freeranger 2012/07/24 22:19:43
    Bad
    Freeranger
    Bummer man.....they forgot about pop ups. They'll have to break for a commercial.

    annoying popups
  • Squatch 2012/07/24 22:19:35
    Good
    Squatch
    +1
    If it is used under the same criteria as a "wire tap" and requires a court order, it could save lives. If it is a means to spy on "the people" shame on them.

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