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If you allow someone to borrow your car and they are in an accident can you be sued for the accident ?

Kennedy1st 2011/05/03 18:39:19
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  • James 2011/05/04 20:56:10
    James
    Yes because it was your judgement to trust this individual with your property in the first place.
  • mike j 2011/05/04 17:26:58
    mike j
    yes in Texas you sure can. if you had a car in the accident even though you were not operating the car at the time of the accident your property being involved could cause you civil or even criminal liability
  • JGF 2011/05/04 13:25:40
    JGF
    If you gave permission for them to use the car you may be liable. It's then up to you, backed by your insurance company, to go after your "friend" for reimbursement.
  • jay jones 2011/05/04 05:15:56
    jay jones
    Thats why i never loan my car to anyone,
  • wolfshadow 2011/05/04 04:18:24
    wolfshadow
    Yes,

    As the owner of the vehicle you are responsible for everything it is involved in. You can be charged with a crime if the person that borrows your car uses it to commit a crime. If the person you loan it to wrecks and it is their fault, your insurance company and you will most likely be sued. If they get a ticket from one of those photo enforcers... you are responsible for that too. If they get a parking ticket... you get to pay.... if they run a toll booth... you will be charged.

    Soooo don't loan out your car!
  • Queen B 2011/05/04 02:47:38
    Queen B
    +1
    Yes you can.
  • DiViews2014 2011/05/04 02:45:21
    DiViews2014
    +1
    I believe there may be some culpability depending upon the situation. I would believe yes.
  • Merlin 2011/05/04 01:53:10 (edited)
    Merlin
    +1
    Sadly the owner can if someone else is driving, my friend got royally screwed by that.
  • Ms.Gamlieli 2011/05/03 23:57:57
    Ms.Gamlieli
    +1
    Im reading all the comments and wow I learned something new. So now I know not to lend my car to anyone. :)
  • santa6642 2011/05/03 22:45:45
    santa6642
    Sorry yes, along with the owner.
  • mg's haven~POTL~PWCM~JLA 2011/05/03 22:34:13
    mg's haven~POTL~PWCM~JLA
    If its your car and it hit something or somene, yep. A true friend would take responsibility for it though.
  • Denny 2011/05/03 21:45:40
    Denny
    sure. With another driver he would not be insured.
  • Spider20 2011/05/03 21:16:00
    Spider20
    Looks like you have your answer
  • vidente 2011/05/03 21:03:18
    vidente
    +1
    You can always be sued for anything. Whether the person suing you would win is something else again. They might have a chance if:

    (1) It could be proven that you knew they didn't have a valid driver's license and let them take the car anyway or
    (2) You did not have liability insurance on your car and allowed it to be driven.

    In my state, at the very least, you can be ticketed for the above, although the first one is rare because it's so hard to prove.
  • METALheadMom 2011/05/03 20:16:20
    METALheadMom
    +1
    ABSOLUTELY. WHEN YOU REGISTER A VEHICLE IN YOUR NAME, YOU ARE COMPLETELY RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYTHING THAT VEHICLE DOES. This is WHY I do not lend my car out to anybody - ever.
  • Murph 2011/05/03 19:57:27
    Murph
    +1
    Yes. In most states, liability goes with the vehicle. A driver in a borrowed vehicle does not own it, and therefore has no insurable interest. You own the vehicle and are required to carry liability coverage.
  • Bob 2011/05/03 19:31:55
    Bob
    +1
    You are liable in all cases where you provide someone access to your vehicle. Insurance might cover it but they then can come after you and the borrower.
  • WF - Rumpelstiltskin -PWCM~JLA 2011/05/03 19:26:35
    WF - Rumpelstiltskin -PWCM~JLA
    +1
    Yes and no
    If you allowed the friend your insurance could be liable and sued
    If you did not, most states place it on the drive at the time.
  • Dmcromance 2011/05/03 19:14:36
    Dmcromance
    I think it depends. If someone lent someone else their car knowing it was dangerous to drive, then maybe the fault goes to the owner of the car. Also it depends on what the cause of the accident was. You can tell if it is a car problem or the driver's problem. That is how you determine the fault. And sometimes its neither. If there is an accident, the problem could be caused by a different driver. It all just depends on the situation.
  • sky blue pink - American 2011/05/03 19:04:00
    sky blue pink - American
    +1
    Yes.
    Have a good one!
  • Callaway 2011/05/03 18:52:21
    Callaway
    +1
    Your car might be your headache, was the person you loaned it to covered by their own insurance or does your insurance specifically indicate they cover anyone who drives your vehicle at your discretion? There is a likelihood your own insurance may or may not even cover the damages on your own car let alone someone elses. It pays to know before you loan with insurance companies anymore.
  • wolfshadow Callaway 2011/05/04 04:21:36
    wolfshadow
    Years ago my insurance company only insured the drivers, not the cars. So no matter what car I was driving I had insurance. That cost a LOT of people money for lending out cars to family members or not insuring the 16 year olds.... They still insure me no matter what I am driving but they do insure actual cars now too...
  • Dixienc 2011/05/03 18:49:30 (edited)
    Dixienc
    In NC you can be if you knowingly allow someone to drive your car under the influence or illegally. It's usually the insurance company that gets sued though not the individual owner. Except in cases where the owner KNOWINGLY allowed someone to drive their vehicle that shouldn't have been because at that point the insurance company covering the car can refuse to pay damages.
  • DZBO 2011/05/03 18:46:01
    DZBO
    +1
    In the state of California.... yes.

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