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Giant Asian Hornets Are Killing People In China, Breeding In Larger Numbers

Transquesta 2013/10/04 01:52:11
EVERYBODY repeat after me in 3, 2, 1. . .

GLOBAL WARMING!

LOLOLOLOLOL!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Giant Asian Hornets Are Killing People In China, Breeding In Larger Numbers: Reports

The Huffington Post | By Andres Jauregui Posted: 10/01/2013 1:11 pm EDT | Updated: 10/03/2013 11:15 am EDT

What's the buzz about giant Asian hornets? They'll kill you painfully and thoroughly -- and they've been reported in the U.S.

Climate change might be contributing to a global rise in insect numbers. As if that weren't bad enough, some of the bugs that appear to be benefitting from that population surge are giant Asian hornets that are killing people unfortunate enough to disturb them.

According to The Guardian, at least "28 people have died and hundreds have been injured in a wave of attacks by giant hornets in central China." The hornets, also known as Vespa mandarinia, have reportedly "chased [victims] for hundreds of meters... and stung [them] as many as 200 times."

The venom from the stings can cause anaphylactic shock and kidney failure, the Guardian reported (as if you wouldn't die from sheer terror). Imagine getting stung 200 times by one of these:
[Hosted by imgur.com]

Chances are, you won't be, since these are queens, but the run-of-the mill variety of Vespa mandarinia are also pretty terrifying. The average stinger on a giant Asian hornet measures about a quarter-inch.

But before we "turn Earth over to the wasps," as Gawker suggested, let's stop and consider that normal-sized stinging insects already do plenty of damage.

For starters, there's the killer bee swarm deaths that are periodically reported in the United States.

Swarming bees have also killed pets and animals as large as horses.

And lets not forget insect pests of the non-bee variety. Crazy ants, an invasive species that's making inroads in the southern U.S., not only bite -- they also destroy electrical wiring.

If humans can live with these pests, then giant Asian hornets shouldn't present too much of a challenge, right? We might soon find out: The hornets were reported in Illinois last year.

In 2013, cicada killer wasps were also spotted in the region.

Read More: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/01/giant-asi...

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  • shadow76 2013/10/06 16:23:24
    shadow76
    +1
    I can't spend my life worrying about what might happen, got enough problems to get thru right now.
  • Phyllis Murphy 2013/10/05 01:04:39
    Phyllis Murphy
    +1
    Yeh, it was killer bees migrating from South America years ago doing their death swarm..Haven't heard so much about them lately and since the bee population is struggling to survive, maybe the mite that is supposed to be killing them has taken them all out. And hornets are really aggressive..was swimming behind our house one day and came up for air and suddenly a hornet was buzzing around my head..I started screaming for husband and diving under water and popping up hoping it would be gone but it would not go away and finally husband came waving something and up the steps and in the house I ran...geez, could not imagine a swarm of hornets....
  • FUA 2013/10/04 19:21:55
    FUA
    +1
    Damn if it had not been for the cooling period the scientists spoke of the " Killer Pests" would have been bigger LMMFAO !
  • Beck∞♥☮♫♫♫∞ 2013/10/04 19:20:47
    Beck∞♥☮♫♫♫∞
    +2
    Then why is the person holding them???...intersting....giant hornets, giant 30 foot squid...hmmm.
  • Transqu... Beck∞♥☮... 2013/10/04 19:23:03
    Transquesta
    +1
    I'm assuming the hornets in the picture are dead.
  • Beck∞♥☮... Transqu... 2013/10/04 19:34:56
    Beck∞♥☮♫♫♫∞
    +1
    OOooo wow did i just have a super blonde moment or what...never thought of that. Thanks Trans.....still wouldnt touch them even if they were dead...*shudders*
  • Transqu... Beck∞♥☮... 2013/10/04 19:40:42
    Transquesta
    +1
    Neither would I! The venom in those stingers can remain active for years.
  • Beck∞♥☮... Transqu... 2013/10/04 19:43:07
    Beck∞♥☮♫♫♫∞
    +1
    YEARS??!!!! yikes!!!
  • Transqu... Beck∞♥☮... 2013/10/04 22:06:55
    Transquesta
    +1
    Entomologists have been known to get 'stung' by being careless taking samples from bees/wasps which have been embedded in pine resin for hundreds of years.
  • Beck∞♥☮... Transqu... 2013/10/07 20:08:14
    Beck∞♥☮♫♫♫∞
    +1
    Fasinating! Just read about this as well...crazy. Can you imagine!
  • Music the Man 2013/10/04 18:57:09
    Music the Man
    +1
    when I was little, my mother used to tell me about these bees called Horse Hornets and she said they were the only bee that terrified her..and years later when I see one I know exactly what she is talking about..what else is china going to import...crappy wallymart junk, stink bugs, snake fish...
  • Bocephus 2013/10/04 18:51:37
  • Reality Central 2013/10/04 17:14:07
    Reality Central
    +1
    Awesome. Population control.
  • Kurt 2013/10/04 14:46:36
    Kurt
    +1
    Maybe if the Chinese didn't invade there habitats this wouldn't happen.
  • Kasaundra ~la~jgirl 2013/10/04 14:17:17
    Kasaundra ~la~jgirl
    +1
    creepy!
  • Jay Theyme 2013/10/04 12:57:27
    Jay Theyme
    +1
    This is happening in Shaanxi province but I saw them spraying out nests here in Henan province last week.

    These things are the size of birds FFS and its not just that the stingers are 2 or 3 cm long but they leave HOLES in your arm (or face or wherever they bite you).
    Holes.
    something in the venom basically starts dissolving a hole large you could almost put a finger into the wound.

    Anyways, if it makes anyone feel better - although it looked like these things were multiplying - it SEEMS (so I'm hearing) the massive spraying campaigns might be working.

    Yeah.. CRAZY stuff. and apparently if you are allergic to bees and wasps - you basically die instantly.
    What is that called? Anaphalactic shock or whatever that is? There is no 'Epi-Pen' with these - you go down from a massive heart attack seconds later.
    (hence the deaths.. about 50 so far).
  • Transqu... Jay Theyme 2013/10/04 17:23:32
    Transquesta
    Just DAMN!

    If I were allergic to those things, I think I'd be asking the government for permission to keep a flamethrower!
  • Jay Theyme Transqu... 2013/10/04 18:12:23
    Jay Theyme
    +1
    It's something to do with their poison.. it 'dissolves' red blood cells. So this video is actually too graphic to post so here's a link:
    http://www.theguardian.com/wo...

    So yeah. basically it melts a 'hole' where it's stinger went.

    Scares the hell out of me too. I saw these guys in hazmat suits going hardcore on a nest on the 2nd floor of a school and (not knowing) thought it was really funny they were so over-dressed.
    (not sure if that nest actually was 'super hornets' but it seems they are just nuking every nest they see hehe)
  • Transqu... Jay Theyme 2013/10/04 18:17:16
    Transquesta
    +1
    I saw the video. These wasps/hornets aren't just dissolving red blood cells, they're dissolving the collagen binding skin cells together. Collagen is tough chit!
  • Jay Theyme Transqu... 2013/10/04 18:33:30
    Jay Theyme
    +1
    Holy S**T that is definitley not good!

    so basically.. if you survive the attacks you STILL get to be horrifically disfigured for the rest of your life :(
  • Transqu... Jay Theyme 2013/10/04 18:35:17
    Transquesta
    +1
    Well, with Vitamin E treatments and skin grafts, it prolly wouldn't be that bad, but yeah, it's gonna seriously f*ck up your program for a while. . .and then there's the possibility of infection which, these days, can be lethal on its own.
  • Little Miss Batman 2013/10/04 12:09:50
  • Transqu... Little ... 2013/10/04 17:23:57
    Transquesta
    Pink stars falling like rain!
  • Little ... Transqu... 2013/10/07 11:54:48
    Little Miss Batman
    HAHA! Hell Yeah!

    Let's hope it doesn't happen though. They all die in the book.
  • Healingme 2013/10/04 12:05:38
    Healingme
    +1
    OMG it's like an Hollywood movie or something.They are really big,the chinese better do something about these insects,because soon or later they will be all over the world.
  • Transqu... Healingme 2013/10/04 17:24:33
    Transquesta
    +1
    I think the Chinese are planning to export them to the middle east. :-^)
  • Healingme Transqu... 2013/10/04 19:18:17
    Healingme
    +1
    And north Korea :)
  • Torchmanner ~PWCM~JLA 2013/10/04 12:03:17 (edited)
    Torchmanner ~PWCM~JLA
    +1
    Looks like they'd have the common sense to wear bug netting. Of course it would be hard to find since they don't have Bass Pro or Cabelas.





    bass pro cabelas  wear mosquito net
  • Transqu... Torchma... 2013/10/04 17:25:12
    Transquesta
    The Chinese are smart. I'm betting they could improvise. :-)
  • Brian ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮ 2013/10/04 07:09:17
    Brian ☮ R P ☮ 2012 ☮
    +2
    Perhaps if America passes laws against them, they will cease to exist. Or at the very least, give us cause to invade China and exterminate them...all for their own good of course.
  • WF - Rumpelstiltskin -PWCM~JLA 2013/10/04 04:50:58
    WF - Rumpelstiltskin -PWCM~JLA
    +2
    First, Global Warming is False. NASA Climatologist have proven in fact it is the nature of our solar system. Venus, Mars and Jupiter have recorded the exact climate temperture increase as the Earth. The last time I heard we as human have not terraformed Mars which is the only possible planet out of the three.

    Now before you state the Antarctic ice cap is shrinking and that is proof, please note the Arctic ice cap has grown at a higher rate than the Antarctic has decreases.
    http://guardianlv.com/2013/09...

    Now as for these wonderful Giant Hornets. A little cut and paste to educate other. More people in Asian die from the common bee sting than by the Giant Hornets

    Quote:
    Asian Giant Hornet Classification and Evolution
    The Asian Giant Hornet is the largest species of Hornet in the world with some queens reaching more than 5cm in length. They are found throughout Eastern Asia, particularly in Japan where they are commonly known as the Giant Sparrow Bee. It is not to be confused with the more placid Asian Hornet which arrived in France in 2005 and, although similar in appearance to the Asian Giant Hornet, the Asian Hornet is thought to be no more dangerous than the European Hornet. The Asian Giant Hornet was first classified in 1852 by a British entomologist called Frede...



























    First, Global Warming is False. NASA Climatologist have proven in fact it is the nature of our solar system. Venus, Mars and Jupiter have recorded the exact climate temperture increase as the Earth. The last time I heard we as human have not terraformed Mars which is the only possible planet out of the three.

    Now before you state the Antarctic ice cap is shrinking and that is proof, please note the Arctic ice cap has grown at a higher rate than the Antarctic has decreases.
    http://guardianlv.com/2013/09...

    Now as for these wonderful Giant Hornets. A little cut and paste to educate other. More people in Asian die from the common bee sting than by the Giant Hornets

    Quote:
    Asian Giant Hornet Classification and Evolution
    The Asian Giant Hornet is the largest species of Hornet in the world with some queens reaching more than 5cm in length. They are found throughout Eastern Asia, particularly in Japan where they are commonly known as the Giant Sparrow Bee. It is not to be confused with the more placid Asian Hornet which arrived in France in 2005 and, although similar in appearance to the Asian Giant Hornet, the Asian Hornet is thought to be no more dangerous than the European Hornet. The Asian Giant Hornet was first classified in 1852 by a British entomologist called Frederick Smith, who worked in the zoology department of the British Museum. He later became the president of the Entomological Society of London from 1862 - 1863.
    Asian Giant Hornet Anatomy and Appearance
    This Wasp species is larger than any other with average Asian Giant Hornets growing to between 2.7cm and 4.5cm in length, with a wingspan of around 7cm. The queens can grow to 5.5cm but are similar in appearance to the worker Hornets with an orange head, black mandibles and a black and golden body. The Asian Giant Hornet has two sets of eyes, one compound and one ocelli, both of which are brown in colour along with their legs. Unlike other species of Wasp, and indeed Bees, the stinger of the Asian Giant Hornet is not barbed and therefore remains attached to it's body once used. This means that Asian Giant Hornets are able to sting their victims repeatedly, injecting a complex venom that is known to contain eight different chemicals.

    Asian Giant Hornet Distribution and Habitat
    The Asian Giant Hornet is found throughout Eastern Asia in Korea, Taiwan, China, Indochina, Nepal, India and Sri Lanka, but they are most commonly found in the mountains of Japan. They are found inhabiting higher altitude forests in both temperate and tropical areas, where there is plenty of food and suitable places to build a nest. The nest is founded by a fertilised female (known as the queen) who selects a suitably sheltered site such as the hollow trunk of a tree, where she begins to build herself a nest out of chewed up bark. Wasp nests contain a series of single cells which together create the well-known honeycomb affect.

    Asian Giant Hornet Behaviour and Lifestyle
    Asian Giant Hornets are known for their fearless and extremely aggressive attitudes, and they seem to favour one animal in particular, the Honeybee. Asian Giant Hornets like to feed the Honeybee Larvae to their own young and are known to completely destroy whole Bee hives in the process. Rather than using their stinger, Asian Giant Hornets, kill the guarding Bees using their strong mandibles with extreme force and agility. One Hornet is said to be able to tear up to 40 Honeybees in half every minute just to get at what it wants. Asian Giant Hornets are sociable Insects, working together within the colony to forage for food, growing the size of the nest and caring for the young. They are known as workers but they do not reproduce, as that is the job of the queen.

    Asian Giant Hornet Reproduction and Life Cycles
    Once having built her nest in the spring, the fertilised queen lays a single egg in each cell which hatch within a week. Asian Giant Hornet Larvae undergo a five-stage changing process known as metamorphosis, in order to get to their adult form. This takes around 14 days by which point the hive has it's first generation of workers that ensure that the colony as a whole is well-maintained. By the late summer, the population of the colony is at it's peak with around 700 workers, most of which are female. The queen then begins to produce fertilised (female) and non-fertilised (male) eggs. The males leave the hive once they have reached their adult form and usually die once mated. The workers and current queens tend to die out in the autumn leaving the young fertilised queens to survive the winter and begin the process again the next spring.

    Asian Giant Hornet Diet and Prey
    The Asian Giant Hornet is a dominant predator within it's environment, mainly hunting other insects, particularly Bees. Asian Giant Hornets are also commonly known to kill larger Insects such as Preying Mantises and even other Wasps and Hornets. Adult Asian Giant Hornets are unable to digest solid proteins and instead only eat the fluids from their victims. They are also known to feed their catch to their larvae (particularly the Honeybee Larvae) in the form of a regurgitated paste. The Larvae then secrete a clear liquid which the adults consume, and is thought to give them a bit of an energy boost. Asian Giant Hornets predominantly use their mandibles rather than their powerful stingers in order to secure their prey.

    Asian Giant Hornet Predators and Threats
    Due to the fact that the Asian Giant Hornet is an apex predator within it's environment, it has no real natural predators within it's native habitats. Humans pose the biggest threat to the world's largest wasp, mainly as they are consumed as part of normal diets in the areas where they are found. This is particularly common in the mountains of Japan where the Asian Giant Hornet populations are in the highest abundance. Despite it's size and bad temper, numbers of the Asian Giant Hornet are declining in certain areas. This is mainly due to habitat loss in the form of deforestation. Honeybees in Eastern Asia are also starting to develop their own defence again the Hornets, trapping them in their nest until it becomes too hot for this giant Wasp and it dies.

    Asian Giant Hornet Interesting Facts and Features
    The stinger of the Asian Giant Hornet is 1/4 inch long and because it has no barb, the Asian Giant Hornet is able to sting it's victims multiple times. The venom injected by the stinger is incredibly potent and contains eight different chemicals, each with a specific purpose. These range from tissue degeneration and breathing difficulties, to making the sting more painful and even attracting other hornets to the victim. The Asian Giant Hornet is a relentless hunter and only a few are said to be able to completely wipe out a 30,000+ Honeybee colony in a couple of hours. The saliva produced by the larvae of the Asian Giant Hornet is said to give them their renowned energy and stamina when consumed on a regular basis. When chasing their prey, they have been reported travelling distances of up to 60 miles, at a top speed of 25 mph.

    Asian Giant Hornet Relationship with Humans
    Oddly enough, these incredibly large and indeed dangerous Insects, are actually eaten by people who share the habitat of the Asian Giant Hornet. The Asian Giant Hornet is consumed by some as a regular source of food and is most commonly deep fried or served as a Hornet sashimi. Despite the fact that the venom of the Asian Giant Hornet is incredibly potent, it is only in rare cases when the person is more vulnerable, that it is actually the poison that has caused them to die. In Japan alone, 40 people are killed every year by stings from Asian Giant Hornets but fatalities are mainly caused by allergic reactions, often from multiple stings.

    Asian Giant Hornet Conservation Status and Life Today
    The Asian Giant Hornet is today listed as a species that is Threatened from extinction in the near future, should the circumstances surrounding it's survival not change. Despite their dominance in their natural environments, the Asian Giant Hornet populations are being severely affected by habitat loss is certain areas, predominantly in the form of deforestation.

    For the record in 2012 Asian had a reported 241 death by the common honey bee.
    (more)
  • SonSpeaker AaL CCLA-ZWC 2013/10/04 04:32:16
    SonSpeaker AaL CCLA-ZWC
    +3
    Or maybe just God. He sent hornets to drive evil people from the land: I will send hornets ahead of you so that they will drive out the Hivites, the Canaanites, and the Hittites before you. I will not drive them out before you in a single year, that the land may not become desolate and the beasts of the field become too numerous for you. I will drive them out before you little by little, until you become fruitful and take possession of the land."(Exodus 23:20-23,27-30)

    The people of Israel were protected by two flying characters, the angels who guarded them until they entered the Land of Canaan and the hornets who will cause three nations to run away from the land after the entrance of the Israelites. The hornets are also a sign for people not to be afraid of the seven nations of Canaan as written in Deuteronomy 7:17-20-
    This is a sign that the godly are not to fear the unrighteous, that He is in control.
  • Transqu... SonSpea... 2013/10/04 04:34:12
    Transquesta
    +1
    This is an interesting take on current events, I'll give you that!
  • SonSpea... Transqu... 2013/10/04 04:34:52
    SonSpeaker AaL CCLA-ZWC
    +2
    It does make you think, actually.
  • Transqu... SonSpea... 2013/10/04 04:36:06
    Transquesta
    +1
    Yeah, but it seems to me that if God were involved, Washington would be hip deep in the things.
  • SonSpea... Transqu... 2013/10/04 04:38:28
    SonSpeaker AaL CCLA-ZWC
    +3
    I think God has a special plan in reserve for D.C., one a lot worse than hornets.
  • Transqu... SonSpea... 2013/10/04 04:40:23 (edited)
    Transquesta
    +1
    I think about that when I fantasize about a boxcar-sized asteroid hitting the Nexus of Evil. I wouldn't be a happy camper if that actually came to pass. On the one hand it'd be great if the people of the earth were liberated from the oppression which gets pumped out of there on a daily basis. On the other, that's a whole LOT of 'collateral damage.'
  • SonSpea... Transqu... 2013/10/04 04:43:20
    SonSpeaker AaL CCLA-ZWC
    +1
    Our fantasies are eerily similar.
  • Transqu... SonSpea... 2013/10/04 04:49:59
    Transquesta
    +2
    My favorite scene from a movie is when the aliens melt the Whitehouse in ID4. My wife won't let me watch that movie when company is around because she's tired of explaining why I keep cheering the aliens.
  • SonSpea... Transqu... 2013/10/04 05:30:58

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