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Drug mix up

Welshtaff 2012/03/04 12:59:33
Have you ever had a drug store give you the wrong prescription drug.
It has happened to me one time and it was Walgreen Drug store and they blamed my wife for the error. WRONG !
What your story, have you had the wrong prescription given you by a drug store?
You!
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  • maggiemay 2012/03/04 15:53:20
    maggiemay
    +5
    I take numerous medication, and have lived in many states. I have never had a problem.
    I started using Walmart 2 years ago for their generic program. Since most of my meds are generic I have found that it is cheaper for me to use the program them my insurance.

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  • Mickey 2012/03/04 20:09:57
    Mickey
    +1
    has never happend to me... fortunately
  • Theresa 2012/03/04 19:03:09
    Theresa
    +1
    It is called Human Error. People make mistakes. It is important for you to verify your pills before taking them blindly.
  • Welshtaff 2012/03/04 17:47:24
    Welshtaff
    Savvy Consumer: Medication Mix-Ups

    By ELISABETH LEAMY (@elisabethleamy)

    July 28, 2006

    Every year, 1.5 million Americans are injured or killed by medication mix-ups. And if you land in the hospital for some reason, errors there are so frequent you could be subjected to a new one every day of your stay. Those heart-stopping statistics come courtesy of a new report by the prestigious Institute of Medicine.

    Seven-year-old Zachary K. has a rare genetic disease that weakens his immune system. So he takes a small dose of antibiotics every day to try to ward off illness. At one point, Zach's mom, Cynthia, noticed that his pills looked different. She was right. Turns out, the pharmacy had dispensed the right pills in the wrong strength -- double strength. Cynthia complained to the pharmacy, turned in the bad bottle and thought nothing more of it. Until it happened again a month later. The same pharmacy had made the same mistake twice.

    Spencer P. suffers from serious sinus problems. His doctor prescribed a new medication and he took it with high hopes. But Spencer immediately suffered devastating side effects: dizziness, difficulty breathing and tightness in his chest. He missed several shifts at his day job and had to quit his night job. Spencer kept taking the medication, ho...











    Savvy Consumer: Medication Mix-Ups

    By ELISABETH LEAMY (@elisabethleamy)

    July 28, 2006

    Every year, 1.5 million Americans are injured or killed by medication mix-ups. And if you land in the hospital for some reason, errors there are so frequent you could be subjected to a new one every day of your stay. Those heart-stopping statistics come courtesy of a new report by the prestigious Institute of Medicine.

    Seven-year-old Zachary K. has a rare genetic disease that weakens his immune system. So he takes a small dose of antibiotics every day to try to ward off illness. At one point, Zach's mom, Cynthia, noticed that his pills looked different. She was right. Turns out, the pharmacy had dispensed the right pills in the wrong strength -- double strength. Cynthia complained to the pharmacy, turned in the bad bottle and thought nothing more of it. Until it happened again a month later. The same pharmacy had made the same mistake twice.

    Spencer P. suffers from serious sinus problems. His doctor prescribed a new medication and he took it with high hopes. But Spencer immediately suffered devastating side effects: dizziness, difficulty breathing and tightness in his chest. He missed several shifts at his day job and had to quit his night job. Spencer kept taking the medication, hoping the side effects would wear off and the drug would begin to work. After a month, he couldn't take it anymore and went to see his doctor. What a shock! The doctor had prescribed a nasal spray called "Flonase." The pharmacy had dispensed a prostate drug called "Flomax."

    Why do medication mix-ups like this happen? For one thing, there are more prescription drugs on the market than ever before, an awful lot for a pharmacist to remember. To make matters worse, some of them have similar names -- like Flonase and Flomax, Celebrex and Cerebyx, Lamisil and Lamictal. If a prescription is called in -- or written in a doctor's famously messy handwriting -- it's easy to see how a pharmacist could get it wrong. Plus that pharmacist is probably overworked. Prescription drug use has doubled while the number of pharmacists has remained the same.

    The three most common mistakes are dispensing the wrong drug, dispensing the wrong dose and giving the wrong instructions. It's hard to say how often pharmacy foul-ups happen, because many states don't require pharmacists to report their errors. When consumers complain, often state pharmacy boards (made up of other pharmacists) dole out light punishments. Until pharmacists are able to spend less time putting pills in bottles, you'll have to pay more attention to what you're putting into your body.

    Do Your Homework:
    Know the size, shape, color and strength of any pills you take routinely.
    If you are trying a new medication, ask your doctor for a sample or ask to see a picture of the drug in the Physician's Desk Reference. You can also go to the Physician's Desk Reference website at www.pdr.net.
    Many doctors now write prescriptions on a computer. If not, be sure your doctor writes neatly and ask him to identify the drug by both the generic and the brand name.
    Also ask your doctor what the medication is most commonly used for, how to take it and what the side effects are.
    Then ask the pharmacist those same questions and make sure the explanations match.
    Finally, note the strength and instructions your doctor had in mind and make sure the pharmacist fills the order as intended.
    (more)
  • marylou5 2012/03/04 17:32:33
    marylou5
    +1
    No, never, there are checks and balances that all pharmacists are required to follow when filling a prescription. Unless a pharmacist breaks protocol, you will receive the correct medication.

    That being said, you have to assume personal responsibility and check your medication before you leave the window. If it is a new medication, the pharmacist can show you a picture that matches your medication/tablets. ASK!

    You can go online, see the tablet in color, read the dosage etc and do your own checking! ASK questions if something seems off!

    Human beings (including you) make mistakes..it's a given!
    Protect yourself. Do your homework! You count/check your change! Why would you not check your prescription?
  • maggiemay 2012/03/04 15:53:20
    maggiemay
    +5
    I take numerous medication, and have lived in many states. I have never had a problem.
    I started using Walmart 2 years ago for their generic program. Since most of my meds are generic I have found that it is cheaper for me to use the program them my insurance.
  • ALofRI 2012/03/04 15:49:11
    ALofRI
    +3
    I use a Walgreens, never have had a problem. It is, I would think, impossible to give out BILLIONS of prescriptions from doctors who are notoriously bad penmen without having a mistake happen now and then. Todays internet prescription direct delivery of typed prescriptions should help. But, mistakes are human. I hope nothing real serious happened.
  • marylou5 ALofRI 2012/03/04 17:36:54
    marylou5
    +1
    No excuse, if the pharmacist can't read the writing...it is his/her job to call the MD who wrote the prescription...as well as check if a dosage is out of line!
    Everyone should be working together..MD, Pharmacist and you!
  • ALofRI marylou5 2012/03/04 18:00:00
    ALofRI
    +1
    I'm not disagreeing with you.
  • marylou5 ALofRI 2012/03/04 19:31:19
    marylou5
    +1
    I knew that you were agreeing with me but thank you:-) You are absolutely right that there will always be medical "accidents" because we are dealing with imperfect
    humans!
  • Judy224 2012/03/04 14:56:43
    Judy224
    +3
    It hasn't happened to me. But it has happened to some kids recently.

    Expert: Kids likely not harmed in CVS pill mix-up
    By BRUCE SHIPKOWSKI | Associated Press – 15 hrs agoEmailShare20PrintEnlarge
    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Children who may have taken breast cancer treatment medication mistakenly distributed by a New Jersey pharmacy instead of prescribed fluoride pills likely won't suffer any health problems, a pharmaceutical expert said Saturday.

    CVS Caremark officials say only a few children ingested pills for breast cancer treatment that they mistakenly received, and company investigators are still working to determine how and why the errors occurred at the pharmacy in Chatham. The pharmacy has acknowledged improperly dispensing Tamoxifen instead of chewable fluoride tablets to children in as many as 50 families between Dec. 1 and Feb. 20.

    "Fortunately, it's very unlikely that this specific drug would cause any serious or adverse effects when used for only a short periods of time," said Daniel Hussar, a professor with the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences.

    CVS said it had spoken with or left messages for every family whose child was dispensed a 0.5 mg fluoride prescription from its Chatham location within the past 60 days. The company issued a...



















    It hasn't happened to me. But it has happened to some kids recently.

    Expert: Kids likely not harmed in CVS pill mix-up
    By BRUCE SHIPKOWSKI | Associated Press – 15 hrs agoEmailShare20PrintEnlarge
    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Children who may have taken breast cancer treatment medication mistakenly distributed by a New Jersey pharmacy instead of prescribed fluoride pills likely won't suffer any health problems, a pharmaceutical expert said Saturday.

    CVS Caremark officials say only a few children ingested pills for breast cancer treatment that they mistakenly received, and company investigators are still working to determine how and why the errors occurred at the pharmacy in Chatham. The pharmacy has acknowledged improperly dispensing Tamoxifen instead of chewable fluoride tablets to children in as many as 50 families between Dec. 1 and Feb. 20.

    "Fortunately, it's very unlikely that this specific drug would cause any serious or adverse effects when used for only a short periods of time," said Daniel Hussar, a professor with the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences.

    CVS said it had spoken with or left messages for every family whose child was dispensed a 0.5 mg fluoride prescription from its Chatham location within the past 60 days. The company issued a statement Friday that said it was "deeply sorry for the mistake that occurred," although it did not explain how the mistake happened.

    Mike DeAngelis, CVS Caremark's director of public relations, has said that "most of the families we have spoken to did not indicate that their children received any incorrect pills." No injuries related to the mix-up have been reported.

    Officials say the two pills are similar looking but have distinctively different tastes. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay and is usually prescribed by dentists for children, while Tamoxifen is used to treat breast cancer and blocks the female hormone estrogen.

    [Also: Meds put on unwanted pounds]

    Hussar noted that while the fluoride pills may have some flavoring because they are meant to be chewed, Tamoxifen is a pill that's intended to be swallowed, so no effort is made to make it taste good. That means a child who mistakenly took a Tamoxifen pill would likely "want to spit it out or tell his parents it tastes bad," said Hussar, who has written and spoken extensively in the areas of new drugs, drug interactions, patient compliance, and issues facing the profession of pharmacy. He's also served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the American Pharmacists Association and is a Past President of the Drug Information Association and the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association.

    Hussar also noted that while such prescription mix-ups are "rare occurrences," they can be important learning tools to help ensure that similar problems don't occur in the future.

    The state attorney general's office has begun a preliminary investigation into the matter. Its consumer affairs division on Friday ordered the Chatham pharmacy to explain the mistake and provide the names of all its employees along with all emails, telephone calls, complaints, and other information related to the mix-up.

    [Also: Healthy eating habits for kids]

    The pharmacy must provide the information by Wednesday and company representatives must appear before division officials for questioning under oath on Friday, an order signed by division Director Thomas R. Calcagni said. He said in the order that the division wants to look into whether any laws were violated.

    DeAngelis said the company is "actively investigating this matter to determine how the mistake occurred in order to take corrective actions to prevent this from happening again."

    CVS Caremark, based in Woonsocket, R.I., runs the second-largest chain of drugstores in the U.S., after Walgreen.
    (more)
  • hari 2012/03/04 14:28:12
    hari
    +3
    yes it may happen as we trust doctor for right medicine to be prescribed after diagnosis and TRUST Druggist / Chemist who are qualified for Pharmacology
  • marylou5 hari 2012/03/04 19:25:59
    marylou5
    +2
    Everything works, IF everyone is conscientious, follows protocol and does the job for which they are paid!!

    The level of integrity is what we all count on, and unfortunately that is sorely lacking in some instances. Mistakes do happen, even when you are dealing with human beings who are meticulous and dedicated to accuracy.

    In the end, you must be your own advocate and assume the ultimate responsibility for your own health issues in conjunction with your MD and Pharmacist. It takes all three working together to assure the best outcome.....and that's the way it should be.
  • hari marylou5 2012/03/04 20:12:37
    hari
    +2
    Yes i agree and dire care needed especially while consuming Antibiotics
  • Sister Jean 2012/03/04 13:46:22
    Sister Jean
    +2
    CVS had a huge mix up recenty
  • Fran-Halen 2012/03/04 13:31:18
    Fran-Halen
    +2
    Medication errors are still very common. They blamed your wife?
  • Welshtaff Fran-Halen 2012/03/04 17:57:35
    Welshtaff
    Yes, the meds were for me, she always checks the drugs against a list I made up and she marks the bottle tops, If I had taken the meds I made not have been here today.
    The drugist may have had a bad day that day and blew up at my wife blaming her for it,
    I think it was confusion between simular names of the drug .
    Customers are another problem where they are impatient and bug the pharmasit to get them served in a hurry.
    CVS stands their ground with customers and we feel comfortable that they do so now mistakes can be controlled to an extent.
  • Fran-Halen Welshtaff 2012/03/04 18:04:47
    Fran-Halen
    +1
    Medication errors are the pharamacists fault. There is a profile on the computer that is very specific to each customer. You should pursue this over the pharmacists head. You still have the Pill bottle and pills? as evidence?
  • U-Dog 2012/03/04 13:30:43
    U-Dog
    +4
    We have not had a medicine mix up at Walgreens but they are definitely not employing the most energetic or brightest bulbs in the pack. I have had better service by brighter people at Wal-Mart of all places and in my book you have to be pretty darn lame to fall below those standards.
  • doofiegirl BTO-t- BCRA-F ~... 2012/03/04 13:24:31
    doofiegirl  BTO-t- BCRA-F ~PWCM~
    +4
    Never had a mix up, but stopped using RiteAid because of a stupid mistake on their part. I asked that my prescription be refilled , and told them I would pick it up on Monday-------- which was Labor Day. They didn't tell me that the pharmacy would be closed ! I could see my meds, and they refused to give them to me. I went to a small locally owned druggist, he was closed too, but gave me enough synthroid to get me through until he could get my scripts transferred the next day. He's a bit more expensive, but I have used his business ever since.! No more chain druggists for me!
  • Bingo's Faddah 2012/03/04 13:14:09

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