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Do you know The history of Gargoyles and why they are put on Buildings? ~history of Gargoyles

☥☽✪☾DAW ☽✪☾ 2011/05/28 04:13:07
If you listen to the wind very carefully, you'll be able to hear me whisper my love for you.
The loathsome   gargoyle, who burns in hell, but secretly yearns for heaven.   Secretly... secretly ~ The Phantom of the Opera (2004)
the greatest warriors are those who know when to ask   for help. Pride can blind a man or a gargoyle. Denying him the   power of living the truth. In these difficult times
There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is   loneliness. And it can eat away at the strongest souls. We all need   the invigorating presence of others
A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashioned into a grotesque caricature of some personal enemy of the architect or owner of the building.
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The word "Gargoyle" shares a common root with the word "Gargle"; which comes from "gargouille", an French word for "Throat". A true gargoyle is a waterspout that protects buildings from water damage but also acts as Guardian

true gargoyle waterspout protects buildings water damage acts guardian nbsp

Gargoyles can be traced back over 4000 years to Egypt, Rome and Greece. Terra cotta water spouts depicting: lions, eagles, and other creatures, including those based on Greek and Roman mythology, were very common. Gargoyle water spouts were even found at the ruins of Pompeii. The first grotesque figures came from Egypt. The Egyptians believed in deities with the heads of animals and frequently replicated these deities in their architecture and wall paintings. When the Greeks saw the Sphinx, they began to incorporate grotesques into their own beliefs. The Greeks believed in many grotesques such as harpies, centaurs, griffins, and chimeras. Greek architects would often place statues of animals called acroterium, in the forms of griffins, at each corner of the roof of their treasuries and temples. In Greek mythology, griffins guarded the gold of Scythia from the Arimaspians, a race of one eyed giants or Cyclops, who would try to steal the gold.

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  • Missa Monstrosity 2012/01/27 23:27:33
    the greatest warriors are those who know when to ask for help. Pride can bl...
    Missa Monstrosity
    during the renaissance, gargolyes were commonly used as holy objects that sat on churches in order to ward off evil spirits. I'm fascinated with gargoyles. Oddly enough, in order to fall asleep at night I day dream that I'm a gargoyle :3
  • ronbo51 2012/01/26 21:13:42 (edited)
    There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is loneliness. And ...
    ronbo51
    Nancy Pelosi's parents????

    see some semblance~~ nancy pelosi is a gargoyle
  • ☥☽✪☾DAW... ronbo51 2012/01/27 23:33:12 (edited)
    ☥☽✪☾DAW ☽✪☾
    maybe to you old man you see demons and Gargoyles in people because you been reading a book about talking snakes and apples that doom all of mankind to eternal hell
  • ronbo51 ☥☽✪☾DAW... 2012/01/28 15:09:32
    ronbo51
    wow, a youthful full of nothing comment
  • ☥☽✪☾DAW... ronbo51 2012/01/28 16:53:56
  • ronbo51 ☥☽✪☾DAW... 2012/01/28 19:48:15
    ronbo51
    thumbs down award
    you aint got game, boy!
  • Mocha_Cupcake 2012/01/26 02:16:16
    The loathsome gargoyle, who burns in hell, but secretly yearns for heaven. ...
    Mocha_Cupcake
    i love them. we might be getting some for our home
  • Maleficent 2012/01/26 00:07:24
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Maleficent
    i always wondered why gargoyles are placed on buildings.
  • ShyCuteArtist 2012/01/25 22:23:55
    The loathsome gargoyle, who burns in hell, but secretly yearns for heaven. ...
    ShyCuteArtist
    I find gargoyles beautiful, really. So strange and beautiful
  • Spider 2012/01/25 20:19:35
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Spider
    Gargoyles need to make their way back into modern architecture. People are no less superstitious today as they were a thousand years ago or more.
  • Thomas 45 2012/01/25 15:34:03
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Thomas 45
    There is much about the past that remains hidden, all we get are small glimspes of what was!
  • 16 2012/01/25 15:03:41
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    16
    All of your question-blogs are very interesting.
  • marcie 2012/01/25 08:49:10
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    marcie
    Now I know since reading your article below but i didn't before reading it. Thank you for an interesting piece of history.
  • Mike 2012/01/25 06:45:08
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Mike
    In fact yes this one but it may have been inspired by scriptural or artistic pursuits.
  • painted desert 2012/01/25 06:17:31
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    painted desert
    My husband was in France and got some really interesting pictures of some Gargoyles on all kinds of buildings. I think they are so interesting. I was told it was for good luck though. Gargoyles
  • Carson 2012/01/25 06:03:15
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Carson
    +1
    They be cool bro.
  • sky 2012/01/25 05:11:29
    the greatest warriors are those who know when to ask for help. Pride can bl...
    sky
    +1
    Good luck?
  • ☥☽✪☾DAW... sky 2012/01/25 05:39:40
    ☥☽✪☾DAW ☽✪☾
    +2
    Protection
  • sky ☥☽✪☾DAW... 2012/01/25 06:24:32
    sky
    Thanks.
  • Noel16161 2011/10/12 04:51:58
    the greatest warriors are those who know when to ask for help. Pride can bl...
    Noel16161
    +1
    Maybe the fanged rabbit was inspired by Monty Python's Search For the Holy Grail. Could be visa-verse though.
  • D.C. Willis 2011/10/11 19:54:50
    There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is loneliness. And ...
    D.C. Willis
    +1
    I may get one of these for my front yard just to see if it scares people away. LOL
  • Crankney - PKM 2011/10/11 17:09:28
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Crankney - PKM
    +2
    Here's a useful one
    fancy rainspouts
  • doc 2011/10/11 16:41:28
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    doc
    +1
    Still working on a replica of my father in law
  • schjaz 2011/10/11 16:08:40
    If you listen to the wind very carefully, you'll be able to hear me whisper m...
    schjaz
    +1
    I had always thought the gargoyles were separate from dragons and they were protectors...kind of like angels.
  • Dawn 2011/09/19 16:40:36
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Dawn
    +1
    They're protectors.
  • misterz 2011/09/19 16:34:11
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    misterz
    +1
    I knew about this - the Grad School I attended has them on several buildings.
  • Nan 2011/09/19 03:10:08
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Nan
    +1
    Love all the info...very good. Lots that I didn't know before. I really enjoy things like this.
  • Shelby 2011/09/19 02:22:24
    There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is loneliness. And ...
    Shelby
    +1
    I've always loved Gargoyles. There's something fierce about them, but also they seem so lonely. Thanks for the info.
  • I NEED A HORSE 2011/09/19 01:26:51
  • darkfeary474 2011/09/19 01:02:50
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    darkfeary474
    +1
    They are also known to be guardians of the property of that which they reside :)
  • WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA 2011/09/18 23:45:15
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    WhereIsAmerica? ~PWCM~JLA
    +2
    I think they are cool.
  • pjwinkler65 2011/09/18 22:41:35
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    pjwinkler65
    +1
    I thought they were guardians.
  • sjalan 2011/09/18 21:06:38
    There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is loneliness. And ...
    sjalan
    +1
    Fantastic expose'.
  • Myst 2011/07/25 11:39:59
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Myst
    +1
    As always I enjoyed...pic great also!
  • SukkiBelle 2011/07/23 15:32:51
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    SukkiBelle
    +3
    I also believe that they keep the evil at bay. I have 7 large gargoyles, 5 outside and 2 inside. I think they work pretty damn well........There hasn't been a jehovah witness at my door since I installed them. 5 2 work pretty damn jehovah witness door installed
  • Welshtaff 2011/07/23 00:23:29
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    Welshtaff
    +1
    They can stand guard and ward off unwanted spirits and other creatures.
    If they're hideous and frightening they can scare off all sorts of things.
    They come alive at night when everyone's asleep (and you can't see them to prove that they don't) so they can protect you when you're vulnerable.
    Better still, the ones with wings can fly round the whole area and cover the village or town as well as the church. (And if someone does see something, who's to say whether it was just a bat or one of the gargoyles on the wing?)
    They return to their places when the sun comes up (and no-one can prove that they weren't out and about, and no-one respectable who rises and sets with the sun is going to be mistaken by them for an enemy and be dealt with).
    During the 1200's when gargoyles first appeared (and at many other times), the Roman Catholic Church was actively involved in converting people of other faiths to the Catholic, often very keenly indeed (as the Christian but non-Catholic Cathars could testify). The argument for decorated gargoyles runs as follows. Since literacy was generally not an option for most people, images were very important. Since the religious images (if any) that non-Christians were accustomed to were of animals or mixtures of animals and humans (e.g. the horned ...



    They can stand guard and ward off unwanted spirits and other creatures.
    If they're hideous and frightening they can scare off all sorts of things.
    They come alive at night when everyone's asleep (and you can't see them to prove that they don't) so they can protect you when you're vulnerable.
    Better still, the ones with wings can fly round the whole area and cover the village or town as well as the church. (And if someone does see something, who's to say whether it was just a bat or one of the gargoyles on the wing?)
    They return to their places when the sun comes up (and no-one can prove that they weren't out and about, and no-one respectable who rises and sets with the sun is going to be mistaken by them for an enemy and be dealt with).
    During the 1200's when gargoyles first appeared (and at many other times), the Roman Catholic Church was actively involved in converting people of other faiths to the Catholic, often very keenly indeed (as the Christian but non-Catholic Cathars could testify). The argument for decorated gargoyles runs as follows. Since literacy was generally not an option for most people, images were very important. Since the religious images (if any) that non-Christians were accustomed to were of animals or mixtures of animals and humans (e.g. the horned god, the Green Man), then putting similar images on churches and cathedrals would encourage non-Catholics to join the religion and go to church, or at least make them feel more comfortable about it, or at least ease the transition.

    This argument has reasonable grounds if you think about some of the other accomodations the Christian (not just Catholic) church has made, such as fixing the birth of Christ at around the winter solstice to fit in with existing pagan celebrations. Even the Romans made similar adaptations, e.g. in Britain the Celtic goddess Suli worshipped at modern day Bath bore a remarkable resemblance to the Roman goddess Minerva. Rather than replace Suli and upset the locals, both were incorporated into and revered in the Roman baths there. It's amazing how flexible an established church can be if it needs to be - pagan images? no problem if it puts bums on seats.

    roman baths flexible established church pagan images bums seats gargoyle
    (more)
  • baboula 2011/07/22 23:34:02
    A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashi...
    baboula
    +1
    oooookkkkk--it's Friday
  • Rar 2011/07/22 09:46:52
    There is a curse that affects both man and gargoyle. It is loneliness. And ...
    Rar
    +1
    Gargoyles drive off evil. They come alive at night when everyone's asleep (you can't see them to prove that they don't) and return to their places when the sun comes up.
  • Myrle Hulme 2011/06/22 11:01:17
    If you listen to the wind very carefully, you'll be able to hear me whisper m...
    Myrle Hulme
    +1
    Very interesting
  • merpelyn 2011/06/21 21:54:43
    If you listen to the wind very carefully, you'll be able to hear me whisper m...
    merpelyn
    +1
    Uhh.. Im not really sure which answer to choose . But I thought they were to ward off any evil from the house . Oh well maybe I'm wrong ! They freak me out though !

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