Quantcast

Do you believe kids these days need Longer School Days and a Longer School Calendar to keep up with other parts of the world in the Academic Area?

Osk 2012/06/14 12:19:17
You!
Add Photos & Videos
More than two dozen school districts in New Jersey could have longer
school days and school years under legislation the Assembly Education
Committee is scheduled to take up today.

The bill (A1391) would create a three-year pilot program. Up to 25
districts could take part after applying to the state commissioner of
education. Corporations would foot the bill for the extra time, then be
reimbursed with tax credits from the state.



"I'm just hoping that we can get these kids that may be struggling an
opportunity to have more time in that classroom with their teachers, to
get whatever they're learning across," said Assemblyman Charles Mainor
(D-Hudson), a sponsor along with Assemblyman Gilbert "Whip" Wilson.



Each district would have to specify the number of hours their school
days would increase and the number of days the school year would be
lengthened, and show that a majority of the districts' staff and parents
support the proposed change. The commissioner would select which
districts participate.



After the pilot program’s third year, the commissioner would submit a
report to the governor and the legislature evaluating the program’s
effectiveness and recommend whether to continue the program and expand
it to other districts.



Companies that fund the program would be eligible for tax credits,
capped at $24 million for the program’s first year, $48 million for the
second and $72 million for the third.

Source: http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/06/longer_school_days_i...

Add a comment above

Top Opinion

  • Nameless 2012/06/14 16:08:49
    Yes
    Nameless
    +3
    I have long thought that school districts should have year round school with a 9 weeks on/4 weeks off kind of rotation - or something close to that. If the entire country went this route, then families could easily plan vacations and childcare - as well as holidays. Far too much time is taken at the beginning of each school year, in districts without this schedule, reviewing material that has already been taught - and this is an huge waste of time/resources. Our children/young adults need to spend more time in the classroom. It certainly will not hurt them, will give parents the security of knowing their children are not latchkey as much, and will even give teachers more time to help their students.

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • mooksiecuddlepoof 2012/06/26 12:44:10
    No
    mooksiecuddlepoof
    The kids (me) should be treated the same as what the others get. It's just that kids now adays are all thinking about boys and facebook, all sorts, parents should encourage them a lot more to stick in.
  • Osk mooksie... 2012/06/26 12:49:12
    Osk
    What does this have to do with the Question??
  • Sir Bud. 2012/06/15 00:34:22
    No
    Sir Bud.
    But instead a better balance of quantity and quality.
  • #Justice4Trayvon 629 BLOCKT... 2012/06/15 00:20:56
    Yes
    #Justice4Trayvon 629 BLOCKT CONS
    +2
    For all intents & purposes America is no longer an agrarian country. The vast majority of fathers no longer require their children to be home to help with the family farm. The "educational year" was planned around the family farm.

    It would do us good to have longer school days as well as school calendar. My question is, will Chris Christie sign on to this when he is so fond of bullying the teachers of NJ?
  • Elephant Lord 2012/06/14 22:32:59
    No
    Elephant Lord
    Norway has less school days, less academic pressure, etc, but they're still doing better than us. Quality, not quantity.
  • Nameless 2012/06/14 16:08:49
    Yes
    Nameless
    +3
    I have long thought that school districts should have year round school with a 9 weeks on/4 weeks off kind of rotation - or something close to that. If the entire country went this route, then families could easily plan vacations and childcare - as well as holidays. Far too much time is taken at the beginning of each school year, in districts without this schedule, reviewing material that has already been taught - and this is an huge waste of time/resources. Our children/young adults need to spend more time in the classroom. It certainly will not hurt them, will give parents the security of knowing their children are not latchkey as much, and will even give teachers more time to help their students.
  • PoliticallyIncorrect 2012/06/14 15:39:27
    Other
    PoliticallyIncorrect
    Until parents, students, and teachers reach a consensus and ALL work toward education, the number of days is meaningless. Interesting summer program - we are running a summer school program for credit recovery. Students who failed during the year are eligible to make a course up at their own pace on the computer and stay on track. It's done in a lab setting without much interaction among students. An unsettling number of chronic failures are passing the entire bank of work in a matter of weeks in an area that they couldn't pass in a semester. The major difference appears to be focus. All the drama and sidebar issues are removed and the students don't play with cell phones, create discipline problems, or get distracted. They come and go as they complete the work. Traditional school is no longer for everyone, just like college is no longer for everyone. If you can't market a degree, it just might be time to head back to technical courses and a means of supporting yourself and your family. Who would have ever thought it?
  • MandaLynne 2012/06/14 14:59:50
    No
    MandaLynne
    No, the schools just need to focus strongly on the basics - reading, writing and arithmetic, quit gearing instruction to the least of the students and cut extraneous crap.
  • Nameless MandaLynne 2012/06/14 19:20:30
    Nameless
    +1
    How about having those students who excel help those who need it? Oh, and that extraneous "crap" like music and art helps children with things like mathematics. Go figure.
  • MandaLynne Nameless 2012/06/14 19:32:14
    MandaLynne
    I was not referring to music and art. I don't know about schools now, but when I was in high school, those of us who excelled did help those who didn't. Go figure.
  • Nameless MandaLynne 2012/06/14 20:57:34 (edited)
    Nameless
    To which extraneous "crap" were you referring?

    (Edit: Oh, wait, perhaps Special Education?)
  • MandaLynne Nameless 2012/06/15 13:49:00
    MandaLynne
    There is no reason for you to be snarky. When you are ready to have a civil conversation, let me know and I will be glad to clarify.
  • Nameless MandaLynne 2012/06/15 14:02:20 (edited)
    Nameless
    You mentioned "extraneous crap" and I am wondering what that is, exactly? I wasn't being snarky (edit: though there was definitely reason to be so). You made the comment and seem to not want to clarify, but that's okay.
  • MandaLynne Nameless 2012/06/15 14:22:53
    MandaLynne
    Don't be willfully obtuse. You know very well your comments about art, music and special education were snarky. You made assumptions and attacked instead of simply asking me to clarify.

    However, I will answer your question. My comment about extraneous crap had nothing to do with elective or helpful classes. It has to do with the excessive waste of monies that should be applied to the curriculum and actually educating our children.

    There are many report out there where school systems are being wasteful - $100 pencil sharpeners, excessive salaries for clerical staff,

    There are many reports out there stating the same thing. Here are some links to just a few:

    http://www.jsonline.com/news/...

    http://money.cnn.com/magazine...
  • Nameless MandaLynne 2012/06/15 16:56:38 (edited)
    Nameless
    You need to attempt to stop being so obtuse in making statements like "extraneous crap." There are many (here and other places) who would describe classes like art, music, and special education classes as such. It would behoove you to be a little more explanatory and not assume that anyone would understand your little quips.

    Now, all that being said, what you stated still does not address the issue of the original poster - and that being that we should consider longer school days or adjust our annual school calendar. Not spending excessively on things like pencil sharpeners does not give our children added learning time - except that we could afford to give our children more of what they really need. Hence, the jump from "extraneous crap" to classes was the natural progression.

    Now, we know how you feel about spending. Yippee. However, that was not the question, so try again. Do you think it would be wise to extend the school day/year or not?
  • Lady Whitewolf 2012/06/14 14:53:03
    Yes
    Lady Whitewolf
  • Barbara 2012/06/14 14:36:31
    Yes
    Barbara
    +1
    Schools get out earlier than they did 20 years, or even 10 years ago. We're not ranked highly in education compared with other so-called industrialized countries, whereas we used to be on top. It's another classic sign of a "super power" going downhill unless we fix it now.
  • Osk Barbara 2012/06/14 17:12:33
    Osk
    +1
    I remember when I was a kid, that I got out between mid to end of June.
  • Barbara Osk 2012/06/16 03:53:22
    Barbara
    +1
    My relatives in Canada, they always had a longer school year than we do in the U.S.
  • L K 2012/06/14 14:17:42 (edited)
    No
    L K
    +3
    No, I think the teachers need less paperwork and should be allowed to teach rather than always having to comply by going to this meeting or that meeting or having to send the children to test prep classes etc. As a veteran teacher for the last 36 years, time was never an issue until states started making pass and failing based on a state tests rather than teacher discretion. Now the school day is focused on one major issue....getting ALL students of all mental abilities to pass a state test. No child left behind? Seriously? How can you compare a precious child who is mentally challenged with a child who is in the gifted program and has an IQ 60 points higher? You can't. Yet, they are judged by the same standards on the state test. One child easily passes, the other may never pass. You cannot expect a child with handicaps to ever reach the same potential as students with greater intellectual abilities. No matter how much you teach or how hard you try, they may all be unique and wonderful, but they all are NOT the same. YES, ALL students improve and learn. BUT, not all students will be on grade level. THAT isn't always achievable. Especially when testing now takes place in February and March. You cannot cram an entire school year's curriculum in 6 months. It used ...
    No, I think the teachers need less paperwork and should be allowed to teach rather than always having to comply by going to this meeting or that meeting or having to send the children to test prep classes etc. As a veteran teacher for the last 36 years, time was never an issue until states started making pass and failing based on a state tests rather than teacher discretion. Now the school day is focused on one major issue....getting ALL students of all mental abilities to pass a state test. No child left behind? Seriously? How can you compare a precious child who is mentally challenged with a child who is in the gifted program and has an IQ 60 points higher? You can't. Yet, they are judged by the same standards on the state test. One child easily passes, the other may never pass. You cannot expect a child with handicaps to ever reach the same potential as students with greater intellectual abilities. No matter how much you teach or how hard you try, they may all be unique and wonderful, but they all are NOT the same. YES, ALL students improve and learn. BUT, not all students will be on grade level. THAT isn't always achievable. Especially when testing now takes place in February and March. You cannot cram an entire school year's curriculum in 6 months. It used to be, teachers taught their hearts out, and if a child improved to the best of his or her ability, the child moved on and his learning was recognized. Now, it all depends on one test. So you can have a kid in 5th grade with a mustache, with his voice sounding like a man, who can be a father, and still sitting in class because the poor student has a Forrust Gump IQ and can't pass the state test. Education has been a mess since the Bush administration created their brand of testing. It isn't the amount of time in school. It is how the school delegates the time. And teachers are there grading papers and planning until 6:00 pm in the evening because during the day, during their former planning time, we are forced to go to meetings about testing and not allowed to actually plan or grade student work. The whole school system has gone nuts. If you keep students in school for too many hours, they shut down and stop paying attention. Somebody in education needs to make educational decisions. NOT idiot politicians. Education should be, teach, learn, evaluate, and move on. Simple!!! You cannot lump every child into a box and think they all will be the same. What happened to the individual??
    (more)
  • Politic... L K 2012/06/14 15:50:43
    PoliticallyIncorrect
    +1
    It started long before Bush.Twenty to 25 years ago it was the Basic Skills Test, then graduation tests, then end of course tests, and soon Parcc tests. I am strongly suspicious that all the testing has more to do with economic competitiveness than it does education. As the American work ethic began to decline and we became less able to compete with other countries we began a series of testing to prove we could still perform. All we did was prove many of our students don't care, many of our parents are distracted by their jobs, money, and their own lives to push their kids, and teachers take the hit because kids fail. ALL stake holders need to be working toward the goals. You can't legislate good parenting, nor can you legislate hard working students, but you can certainly harass and brow-beat the teachers. The dynamics have to change.
  • L K Politic... 2012/06/16 00:16:03 (edited)
    L K
    Well, I agree with much of what you said, but the testing for years was a national test to see how well each state did and how students measured up on a national level. It didn't determine whether students passed or failed, or if schools received bonuses. Teachers were allowed to determine if a child deserved to pass, not the state. Florida stopped our NRT test a couple years ago because our students were not measuring up to other states. So rather than dropping the FCAT,( our state tests), they dropped the important one, the national test. If we can't compete in our own nation, how the heck can we compete internationally? I'll tell you how. By letting educators teach, creating appropriate tests to measure progress, and by not basing everything on one test. There is so much wrong now in education and it isn't the teachers.....we have our hands tied.
  • Politic... L K 2012/06/16 01:53:01
    PoliticallyIncorrect
    In my state, if you didn't pass the basic skills test, or later the graduation test, you didn't graduate. There was no comparison made, it was pretty well set. If you didn't pass it, you didn't graduate. In New York, if you didn't pass the Regent's Test, you didn't graduate. We have never had the luxury of a teacher's subjective decision on whether a student should graduate or not. It has been test success for graduation for at least 30 years here. Letting everyone make up a test does not guarantee equality in curriculum across the board. It doesn't even measure up school to school. Teachers have been fired because they taught the test. How many teachers do you think would be tempted to teach the test if they knew what was on it? When their jobs might depend upon the results, don't think that many of them wouldn't cheat. Without a national test how did you prove you met AYP in NCLB? Did you give up federal funds? You had to have something national to comply with federal law. Isn't Florida one of the states in PARCC? You will have a national test whether you want it or not. How Florida uses it will be interesting to see.n If you listen to the bureaucratic educators, you are the professional and you should use your expertise to engage all students. Right. All stakeholders have to accept the challenge.
  • L K Politic... 2012/06/16 21:08:21 (edited)
    L K
    Yes there are tests high school students take that determines if they graduate or not. I teach elementary school and those are the references I was making and referring to. I am sorry I didn't make myself clear. I consider high school a whole other ball game with different criteria than elementary. First of all while I imagine that there are unethical teachers who would teach the test and do the wrong thing, 99% of teachers are dedicated and would never dream of doing that. BUT, to prevent it from ever happening, all tests require teachers to sign a document each year stating to follow test guidelines etc. ALSO, each classroom has a proctor to watch students and teachers to make sure everything that goes on during testing is on the up and up. There is no way anything unprofessional could occur. Plus, only teachers are allowed to gather test booklets and they must hand them over to the authorities to be locked up right after testing. There are even police on campus all around the state. Yes, we have a national teacher's test. We met AYP by following the guidelines, but that is determined on percentages of improvement and per grade level and other factors on state tests not national tests. My school was an A school and we followed criteria governed by the state. But...
    Yes there are tests high school students take that determines if they graduate or not. I teach elementary school and those are the references I was making and referring to. I am sorry I didn't make myself clear. I consider high school a whole other ball game with different criteria than elementary. First of all while I imagine that there are unethical teachers who would teach the test and do the wrong thing, 99% of teachers are dedicated and would never dream of doing that. BUT, to prevent it from ever happening, all tests require teachers to sign a document each year stating to follow test guidelines etc. ALSO, each classroom has a proctor to watch students and teachers to make sure everything that goes on during testing is on the up and up. There is no way anything unprofessional could occur. Plus, only teachers are allowed to gather test booklets and they must hand them over to the authorities to be locked up right after testing. There are even police on campus all around the state. Yes, we have a national teacher's test. We met AYP by following the guidelines, but that is determined on percentages of improvement and per grade level and other factors on state tests not national tests. My school was an A school and we followed criteria governed by the state. But students haven't taken the NRT in several years. BTW, last year my writing scores were the 2nd highest in the state, pretty cool. I retired this year but several schools had me come in and give workshops to teachers to help them prepare the children. The key is motivation, keeping them interested, and teaching relevant material as well as not boring them to death. LOL Oh, and teachers never know what exactly is on a test, just what skills they need to teach. Then we sit down and go over the data and determine our strengths as a school and as a teacher and determine
    how to improve improve each year. I teach reading and writing and 90% of my students' scores consistently improve in reading from 3rd to 4th grade and my writing scores rock the charts. My strategy? I was an actress before I taught school. I do improvisation, teach method acting skills ( using sensory imagery for character development) and my students truly become amazingly descriptive writers. I also teach 4th graders Shakespeare, but that's just me. I love what I do and the kids know it....But this year teachers on the elementary level went without breaks every day due to budget cuts and moral was low. It was very sad. It didn't bother me since when I started teaching we didn't have breaks except lunch and I taught my own art music and PE. But new teachers aren't used to doing that. And yes, it will be very interesting to see what happens in education in the years to come.
    (more)
  • Politic... L K 2012/06/17 02:54:30
    PoliticallyIncorrect
    We have elementary tests given in 3rd and 8th. Nothing we give to determine graduation or promotion is local. They are all either state or national tests.We began an end-of-course-test a few years ago that the students didn't even have to pass as long as their semester average was at least a 70. You can imagine how elevated grades could be given throughout the semester to counter balance the test. It is 20% of the grade for the second semester of the course. It will be replaced in 2014 by PARCC. I am the school test coordinator and all of our testing with the exception of the phased out graduation test are done on line. I love it. No cheating, no lost test booklets, and the kids love it too. It also helps to do the testing on line because the PARCC is only available on line.
  • L K Politic... 2012/06/17 12:31:03 (edited)
    L K
    Well your state is much smarter than our state!!! We test from 3rd grade all the way up. in 4th, the focus is a writing exam of either expository or narrative, we have to teach both and never know which it will be, a reading and math test. In 5th it is reading, math and focus is science. Then is it reading math and science all the way up and in 8th and tenth the writing test continues adding persuasive essays. There is SO much testing and if the students don't score at a certain level on each test they don't pass. It is crazy. On the FL dept of education site they give past tests as samples to parents so they have an idea what kinds of skills are expected at each level. Take a look. But each year it is more detailed and harder. How great you test on line! I envy you.
    http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcatrel...
    http://fcat.fldoe.org/writing...
  • Politic... L K 2012/06/17 14:41:58
    PoliticallyIncorrect
    We test the kids to death and spend as much time testing as teaching. My theory is that all of this testing was designed to prove we are still competitive as we are being slam-dunked by the productivity of the rest of the world. What the testing doesn't take into account is the students who don't care to perform. School is a legal dictate and they don't want to be there. It also doesn't take into account the parents who are too busy with themselves to push their kids to do their school work. In a number of cases, 2 of the 3 stakeholders aren't involved.
  • L K Politic... 2012/06/18 12:39:06
    L K
    +1
    Very true indeed!
  • ~Adrien~ 2012/06/14 13:53:50
    No
    ~Adrien~
    +2
    They just need better curriculum during the school year, positive reinforcements and support from home AND school. . .
  • Osk 2012/06/14 13:41:47
    Yes
    Osk
    +2
    I do know that some school districts, NOT in NJ, have it where it is all year round. I used to work in retail and I have met some of these parents. They have no Summer vacation, but still have week (or two) through out the year where they have no school. I asked the kids if they liked it and they said that they do and that they have learned a lot more then what they used to have). My mother then told me that for the end of the school year, they only get 1 month off.

    I think this would be a better idea
  • heirsoftheking 2012/06/14 13:37:21 (edited)
    No
    heirsoftheking
    +1
    Kids are kids. Let them be kids and quit trying to shove too much education down their throats - otherwise you'll educate them to death. Although you still need lots of education to make it in this world, the benefits of a college education seemed to have peaked, with the money spent and the fact that most college graduates can't get jobs now - I wonder how long this will go on? Look at the economies of Japan, Europe, and China - they've all peaked, too, and these are places that supposedly have higher education standards than the US.

    The bottom line is 'Ask kids if they want a longer school year.' I guarantee you the answer is 'NO.'
  • Gunner 2012/06/14 12:35:40
    No
    Gunner
    +2
    The problem is not the length of the school year, the problem is the quality of education during the school year. If an education program is "so-so", what good is it going to do to lengthen this "so-so" program. An analogy: It would be like driving a car an extra mile with a flat tire instead of fixing the flat tire before resuming the trip. Also, kids "learn" during the school year, but they "grow up" during the summer.
  • Boris Badinov 2012/06/14 12:30:23
    No
    Boris Badinov
    +2
    They need less indoctrination and more scholastic subject matter. The Dept of Ed has to go..
  • Xerxes 2012/06/14 12:29:10
    Yes
    Xerxes
    +2
    My primary school education was in the UK, returned to U.S. skipped 3 grades
  • HarleyCharley 2012/06/14 12:24:28
    Yes
    HarleyCharley
    +2
    we are falling behind...

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

Living

2014/10/23 06:50:12

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals