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Can one disagree with some of their church's teaching,yet still love their church?

Sister Jean 2012/06/05 18:35:42
Related Topics: Church, Love, Teaching
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  • Jan Haskell 2012/06/05 19:27:21
    yes
    Jan Haskell
    +6
    Of course it's possible. Since God is the real head of the church, we need to pray for His guidance.

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  • kitkat42 2012/06/07 03:21:36
    no
    kitkat42
    +1
    I honestly find it next to impossible. There are too many things I disagree with.
  • SheWhoFliesWithDragons 2012/06/06 19:05:52
    yes
    SheWhoFliesWithDragons
    +1
    Definitely.
  • beach bum 2012/06/06 11:11:54
    yes
    beach bum
  • Scout 2012/06/06 11:05:53
    yes
    Scout
    +2
    Yes...the core beliefs of Christianity are simple, but man tends to add so many of his own doctrines.
  • ZERO 2012/06/06 08:03:20
    yes
    ZERO
    +2
    Disagreeing with some of the things taught in church just means you're paying attention, don't sweat it, churches are communities of people and pobody's nerfect.
  • KoAm 2012/06/06 07:08:07
    yes
    KoAm
    +1
    ... provided that we keep the disagreements to ourselves, and provided that we don't encourage anyone to act according to our own beliefs, in contradiction to the church's.
  • Pops 2012/06/06 04:26:31
    yes
    Pops
    +1
    It makes things interesting at least!
  • wtw 2012/06/06 03:47:35
    yes
    wtw
    +2
    As long as the main beliefs remain intact!
  • Ma La 2012/06/06 03:11:06
    yes
    Ma La
    +1
    But just doctrine, not dogma.

    I disagreed with my Dad on many things and still loved him..
  • Kashee 2012/06/06 02:30:30
    yes
    Kashee
    +1
    Many people can and they do. I actually think it is very important to assess all of the teachings of your church and if something is out of line with your core beliefs, chuck it. I refuse to have my mind filled with things I do not believe, but I don't throw it all away.
  • den 2012/06/06 01:28:01
    None of the above
    den
    up to a point but they must believe Jesus is the Christ the Son of the living God and that we are saved by grace through faith +nothing
  • Sister ... den 2012/06/06 01:29:28
    Sister Jean
    +3
    and what about Jewish people?
  • den Sister ... 2012/06/06 01:57:02
    den
    good question- we love Jewish people yet they must receive Jesus for salvation as "there is no other name under heaven . whereby we must be saved"
  • Sister ... den 2012/06/06 02:00:20
    Sister Jean
    +2
    Jesus mother was a Jew as was His foster father
  • cjd 2012/06/06 00:41:41
    yes
    cjd
    +1
    of course
  • Chris- Demon of the PHAET 2012/06/05 23:59:20
    yes
    Chris- Demon of the PHAET
    +2
    Absolutely. My mother remains a practicing Catholic, as she has been all her life, but she loves me unconditionally and I happen to be gay.
  • Kashee Chris- ... 2012/06/06 02:25:39
    Kashee
    +2
    Great Mama.
  • Chris- ... Kashee 2012/06/06 10:18:45
    Chris- Demon of the PHAET
    +2
    Yes she is. :-)
  • KoAm Chris- ... 2012/06/06 07:11:33 (edited)
    KoAm
    She is not violating or disagreeing with any Church teaching by loving you unconditionally.

    You seem to be implying that loving a gay person and being a practicing Catholic are at opposites. They most definitely are not.

    As Catholics, we are called to extend the same love and respect to gay people as we would to anyone else -- it's just the sexual behavior that we're not supposed to approve. The Catholic Catechism says this clearly.

    You don't think that being a practicing Catholic involves hating gay PEOPLE, do you? There is nothing in Catholic teaching that involves hating gays.

    It's the behavior and lifestyle we are called to oppose -- not the people who engage in them.
  • Chris- ... KoAm 2012/06/06 10:25:34
    Chris- Demon of the PHAET
    She accepts my behavior and lifestyle as well as loving me. She always has.
  • rand 2012/06/05 23:02:41
    yes
    rand
    +2
    ...just as they can disagree with a friend and still love her.
  • Sister ... rand 2012/06/05 23:44:37
  • Mark 2012/06/05 22:32:15
    yes
    Mark
    +3
    The Church of England is going through some huge convulsions at the moment over the ordination of women & practising homosexual vicars and marriage etc.
  • Sister ... Mark 2012/06/05 22:34:41
  • jackie 2012/06/05 22:03:42
    yes
    jackie
    +1
    Defiantly. I disagreed sometimes.
  • PDenoli 2012/06/05 22:00:45
    yes
    PDenoli
    +1
    As long as you have free will, you can have faith in anything. If you can have faith in anything, you can have faith in things that only partly align with your church's teachings. Heck, you could have faith in things that WHOLLY disagree with your church, even as you love the church itself.

    IMHO, there are two elements to a relationship based on faith. Your acceptance of the other and the others' acceptance of you. Either side of that equation can be wholly or partially aligned and should be recognized and accepted for what it is.

    For any particular faith, there may also be a gradient between minor elements of faith or ritual down toward critical rejection of core tenets. Regardless of which is where, it's logical that at some point on this spectrum, your church may fairly characterize your disagreement as blasphemous so that while you don't have a problem with the church - the church has a problem with you.

    Neither has a secular obligation to change, but it seems fair to recognize the parishioner has the option (obligation) to leave the church just as the church has the option (obligation) to reject the parishioner.

    In the end, there are at least two ways to view dissonance with the Church:
    First: "The stone the builders rejected has become the capstone"
    Second: "......

    As long as you have free will, you can have faith in anything. If you can have faith in anything, you can have faith in things that only partly align with your church's teachings. Heck, you could have faith in things that WHOLLY disagree with your church, even as you love the church itself.

    IMHO, there are two elements to a relationship based on faith. Your acceptance of the other and the others' acceptance of you. Either side of that equation can be wholly or partially aligned and should be recognized and accepted for what it is.

    For any particular faith, there may also be a gradient between minor elements of faith or ritual down toward critical rejection of core tenets. Regardless of which is where, it's logical that at some point on this spectrum, your church may fairly characterize your disagreement as blasphemous so that while you don't have a problem with the church - the church has a problem with you.

    Neither has a secular obligation to change, but it seems fair to recognize the parishioner has the option (obligation) to leave the church just as the church has the option (obligation) to reject the parishioner.

    In the end, there are at least two ways to view dissonance with the Church:
    First: "The stone the builders rejected has become the capstone"
    Second: "...they have not listened to Him; they will be wanderers among the nations"

    I find that where there is conflict in faith the person of ego presumes the first while failing to consider the second. Where there is conflict in faith without ego, the meek may fear the second sufficiently to feel compelled to consider the first.
    (more)
  • den PDenoli 2012/06/06 01:57:54
    den
    free will is an illusion produced by arrogance
  • PDenoli den 2012/06/06 21:27:18 (edited)
    PDenoli
    So while I believe it is in my capacity to offer either a civil or a rude response to your assertion ...you would be convinced it is beyond my control. What's worse - this means that you must believe that you have no control over yourself, either.

    On one hand, you have my sincere pity.
    On the other hand, put the bath salts down and stay away from my pets.
  • wildcat 2012/06/05 21:49:43
    yes
    wildcat
    +1
    Isn't that what Martin Luther did?
  • Sister ... wildcat 2012/06/05 22:35:05
  • KoAm Sister ... 2012/06/06 07:13:26
    KoAm
    Not quite, sister. That's why there's a Lutheran Church now.
  • Veritas 2012/06/05 21:46:31
    yes
    Veritas
    +2
    I think the church is people, so yes. I may not agree with all of the teaching (assuming it wasn't outright craziness!) and still love the church.
  • Sister ... Veritas 2012/06/05 21:48:02
  • D D 2012/06/05 21:33:22
    yes
    D D
    +1
    My dad has to agree with everything in order to be a member. When my parents changed churches I couldn't understand why he was like that.
  • Vennie 2012/06/05 20:53:51
    yes
    Vennie
    +2
    Yes, definitely. An example that comes to mind is Catholics and birth control. There is no question that many practicing Catholic couples practice some form of birth control other than the famously undependable rhythm method. These folks may be faithful in most or all other precepts but just cannot accept the Church's stand on birth control and the effect that additional children--or any children--would have on their lives.
  • Sister ... Vennie 2012/06/05 21:15:35
    Sister Jean
    +1
    right I never see large families amongst my Catholic friends
  • cm 2012/06/05 20:41:27
    yes
    cm
    Hard for me to say since I don't and won't ever belong to a church. I don't always agree with my kids but I still love them so I'm guessing, loving your church is not much different.
  • Barefoot Peace and Love∞ijm... 2012/06/05 20:15:00
    yes
    Barefoot Peace and Love∞ijm♥☮♥∞
    +1
    Yes, I think so....
  • Manster 2012/06/05 20:10:44
    yes
    Manster
    +1
    Yes.The human factor of the church is bound to cause disagreement in some areas and in some things.
  • Sister ... Manster 2012/06/05 20:19:58

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