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BLIND justice. Should people who are BLIND be used in juries?

stevegtexas@aol.com 2012/10/18 16:09:52
Related Topics: Justice, Read, Police
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  • musiclover92 2012/10/21 19:48:46
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    musiclover92
    +1
    they have to see the accident to be a witness. anyone can be deceived by their ears or what they touch.
  • ajracestables1 2012/10/21 01:50:23
    Undecided
    ajracestables1
    +1
    I don't see how being blind would affect the facts presented to the jury unless there was visual evidence that would make a difference in the outcome of the case.
  • Greg Saunders 2012/10/20 16:17:16
    yes, well of course!
    Greg Saunders
    According to QI a comedy quiz but using serious research showed that blind people scored better detecting lies than those with all the senses and even better than a lie detector.
  • Yuna Rahl 2012/10/20 04:10:46
    yes, well of course!
    Yuna Rahl
    So they wont judge by appearance
  • Joe 2012/10/19 23:01:18
    yes, well of course!
    Joe
    I'd much rather have those who are sightless serve on juries than having libtards voting for the next POTUS! jms
  • mustangluver 2012/10/19 17:11:04
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    mustangluver
    +2
    I never heard of a blind person being on a jury. How can they see the evidence such as is sometimes presented or how can they see charts and graphs or pics? They also can't ID a perp...or see the body language of the defendant. A court case is as visual as it is verbal. I believe jurors are mainly selected from drivers license records, so it's likely the blind aren't in the normal draft pool.
  • Joe mustang... 2012/10/19 23:04:25
    Joe
    +1
    In the State of Illinois jurors are selected from voter registration. jms
  • mustang... Joe 2012/10/20 04:38:02
    mustangluver
    Well a blind person can't drive and they can't serve on a jury.
  • David 2012/10/19 13:44:21
    yes, well of course!
    David
    As long as they fit all other requirements, I don't see why not. In my experience, most juries are composed of at least 1/2 panel members who are "blind" to reason and facts, so someone who's physically blind wouldn't impact things one way or another, for the most part.
  • ghosiejackson 2012/10/19 11:43:10
    yes, well of course!
    ghosiejackson
    If not, its like some kinda prejudice
  • clasact 2012/10/19 10:01:28
    Undecided
    clasact
    It would kind of depend on the case,If they had to see evidance they wouldnt be to good at it but mostly you just listen
  • mamacrash 2012/10/19 02:41:09
    yes, well of course!
    mamacrash
    Why not, they can hear and will most likely remember more details than most since their senses are more attune to what senses they have. They are also not sidetracked by visuals in the trial.
  • Olde' Smoke 2012/10/19 02:07:41
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    Olde' Smoke
    Not if they have to see Evidance. Otherwise yes
  • Marc m 2012/10/19 01:44:44
    Undecided
    Marc m
    Nice Idea.
  • Cat 2012/10/19 01:18:14
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    Cat
    +1
    They are only going to be exposed to testimony, they won't see any physical evidence, facial expressions and body language, crime scene photos or reenactments, and anyone who would attempt to describe what they are not seeing might be prejudiced for the defense or the prosecution,
  • timothy.hill.14 2012/10/18 23:58:41
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    timothy.hill.14
    +1
    How could they observe witnesses or study police reports and other evidence? I think they would be too limited to be fully functional jurors.
  • Swampdog PWCM 2012/10/18 23:54:59
    yes, well of course!
    Swampdog PWCM
    +1
    Great idea, that way you wouldn't know if they were sleeping unless they started snoring!
  • Mimosa 2012/10/18 23:18:07
    Undecided
    Mimosa
    blind justice

    Please note, lady justice has always been blind.
  • stevegt... Mimosa 2012/10/22 15:47:49
  • Mimosa stevegt... 2012/10/22 19:49:15
    Mimosa
    Ya know, I don't know what they originally had in mind, (I think it is supposed to mean "withour predjudice") but spending years in the legal community, and seeing pertinent evidence suppressed in court, you see a lot of the INjustice that undermines the system.
  • Andrew 2012/10/18 23:03:44
    Undecided
    Andrew
    Undecided, I would think there woud be some things you would have to see but then it is mostly audible.
  • Shadow_Wolf 2012/10/18 20:41:19
    yes, well of course!
    Shadow_Wolf
    All the jury does is listen, to evidence. You don't need eyes for that. However when there is visual or written evidence someone will most likely narrate it anyway
  • gaylehelen 2012/10/18 20:09:35
    yes, well of course!
    gaylehelen
    It would be discrimination not to. I know their other senses help make up for the blindness, so may make a better juror than expected. Being able to hear is the most important part of being on a jury. I know I listened intently as I served and don't see why a blind person couldn't have been on the case I was on.
  • Tim Upham 2012/10/18 20:08:32
    yes, well of course!
    Tim Upham
    +1
    They are just listening to testimony.
  • gocar 2012/10/18 19:17:07
    yes, well of course!
    gocar
    +1
    They probably listen better than most.
  • Stan Kapusta 2012/10/18 18:15:40
    yes, well of course!
    Stan Kapusta
    +1
    There are blind people alot smarter than sighted people. Krauthhammer[I hope i spelled it right] would make me look like a mental midget.
  • SandraKogelheide 2012/10/18 17:38:09
    yes, well of course!
    SandraKogelheide
    +1
    They have equal rights to be on a jury.
  • Lorax 2012/10/18 17:32:25
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    Lorax
    +2
    No. A juror should be able to see reactions and body language of everyone who is called as a witness.
  • Dayna_king 2012/10/18 17:24:28
    yes, well of course!
    Dayna_king
    Just because a person is blind does not mean they are incapable of understanding facts and making informed decisions. When the evidence is visual it can be described to the person. Where most people can observe body language the blind can observe voice pitch and tone, which with many people changes when they lie or other emotions interfere. Just because a person has less then perfect eye sight does not mean they can not be part of the justice process.
  • Proud 2012/10/18 17:00:11
  • Proud Proud 2012/10/18 17:02:55
  • Waiting in the Wings 2012/10/18 16:57:29
    yes, well of course!
    Waiting in the Wings
    They can still comprehend the facts.
  • Pedalpusher 2012/10/18 16:41:08
    yes, well of course!
    Pedalpusher
    +1
    They can hear, and that sometimes is more important then what you see. They often have heightened other senses that make up for being blind. If an item is showed and needs a description the person presenting it can be told to give a detailed description.
  • Cochise 2012/10/18 16:33:23
    Undecided
    Cochise
    I believe in everybody being treated as equals, but, I feel that a juror should be able to see the accused, read his body language, and make eye contact with him; this helps in making a decision.
  • Waiting... Cochise 2012/10/18 16:59:20
    Waiting in the Wings
    What about focusing on the facts and interviews (all of which are given orally)?
  • majd 2012/10/18 16:19:50
    a. no way! thats like having police officers who cannot read or write!
    majd
    +1
    i felt no its the right answer
  • dear•LT13☻ 2012/10/18 16:19:23
    yes, well of course!
    dear•LT13☻
    seems like a good idea
  • bill.fleming.77 2012/10/18 16:15:18 (edited)
    yes, well of course!
    bill.fleming.77
    +1
    I actually think this is a very good idea. Eliminating any prejudice based on an individuals appearance and having a case decided based strictly on the testimony. There would have to exceptions if any of the evidence that is being introduced requires sight. so maybe the best solution is to not have the juror's see the defendant in any trial by jury case. Decision based on testimony and evidence only
  • Osk 2012/10/18 16:13:21
    yes, well of course!
    Osk
    +1
    They may not see the evidences, but they can listen just as good as anyone else. Blind people are good for Listening and Feeling. So, I do not see the problem
  • Robin 2012/10/18 16:11:00
    Undecided
    Robin
    +1
    Not if there is evidence the must be viewed. Cases of which no physical evidence is being presented.. why not?

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