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80 Percent of Americans Work 'After Hours,' Equaling an Extra Day of Work Per Week: Has Recession Forced Fewer to Work More?

Fef 2012/07/02 21:00:00
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The recession and slow recovery have kept unemployment above 8 percent. Employers refuse to hire new employees in times of uncertainty. Many employers have laid off or reduced their workforce to avoid bankruptcy during the recession. Has this led to fewer employees working harder and longer hours?

Techcrunch reporter Sarah Perez reveals how 80% of the workforce works longer hours equaling an extra day of work per week. Do you think the recession has forced fewer employees to work more hours?

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Read More: http://techcrunch.com/2012/07/02/80-of-americans-w...

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Top Opinion

  • Semper Fi 2012/07/03 13:31:47
    Yes
    Semper Fi
    +6
    Since our dramatic cut backs a few years ago, I work 10-12 hour days and about every other weekend. Of course the city, county, state and Feds could care less as they pile even more regulation, fees, and fines on top of small businesses.

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  • Somkey ... strawberry 2012/07/06 09:48:12
    Somkey the Hores
    ANOTHER socialist, leftist construct.
  • Mel the Witch POTL PWCM~JLA 2012/07/03 22:02:09
    Yes
    Mel the Witch POTL PWCM~JLA
    +1
    And if you work for an insurance Company that treats is employees like trash, You work longer hours or don't have a job..
  • TasselLady 2012/07/03 20:13:32
    Yes
    TasselLady
    +3
    And way too hard too.
  • tblackb 2012/07/03 19:13:47
    No
    tblackb
    +5
    american corporations and business have been downsizing for the past 25-30 years. thus. companies have been laying off workers for decades and demanding more out of the employees that remain. every since I graduated college with a degree in accounting, back in early 90's, 9-12 hour work days were normal. things in this country didn't just get this way over night. people just haven't been paying attention or were isolated from what was going on.
  • aneed2know tblackb 2012/07/05 07:30:29
    aneed2know
    true that
  • strawberry tblackb 2012/07/06 01:56:28
    strawberry
    U.S. economy has never been really stable. You are correct about corporations and business downsizing which goes even much further back. The goal of Capitalism is to make huge profits off cheap labor. Employees are not paid proper wages for their time and production. Capitalism which once built America, has become a greedy system for the wealthy. So many Americans cannot see this is what President Obama is trying to reverse. Obama is not trying to destroy Capitalism but bring it to balance. We are a Nation that needs both Socialism and Capitalism, but both systems are abused.
  • tblackb strawberry 2012/07/06 02:08:18
    tblackb
    that's exactly what happening...the rich have gotten excessively rich while everyone else has been retrogressing. Republicans throw around the word socialism and people go crazy not understanding what it means. everyone has been sold on the ideal the "american dream" but don't understand what that means. there is a reason why 1% of this countries population holds 99% of its wealth. the system is skewed for the rich and the rest of us will not join together to demand the system be changed to benefit everyone.
  • Posha King 2012/07/03 19:09:22
    Yes
    Posha King
    +2
    As a small business owner, I see this every day. I am the minority owner and chose to be on payroll and not salary. Because I'm the entire office and tech staff, I am the one who works late. We have been hit so hard the past few years that we can't afford to bring in another person, even part time, so I have to come in early and stay late to make sure things get done. It's required to stay in business until things bounce back and we can hire who we actually need.
  • morris44 2012/07/03 18:32:40
    Yes
    morris44
    +4
    No question.

    And I think it will only get worse as we lose leverage as workers to employers.

    it will be take it or leave it, lucky to have a job.
  • aneed2know morris44 2012/07/05 07:31:11
    aneed2know
    +1
    its getting there
  • Lorelei Lee 2012/07/03 18:29:01
    Yes
    Lorelei Lee
    +1
    Constantly I see signs up saying " We're Hiring " and I put in an application and never get a call back. Job fairs are a waste of time so don't go to any of them.
  • Sonic 2012/07/03 16:30:23
    Yes
    Sonic
    +1
    I know people who seek out multiple forms of income (jobs, careers, networking marketing, self publishing, motization) just to make ends meet. Kind of sucks that people have to work more. It's like the recession is stealing jobs from Americans. And we're all blaming immigrants.
  • cmdrbnd007 2012/07/03 16:25:02
    Yes
    cmdrbnd007
    +1
    That might be true for some but not for me. I work an extra day every pay period because I want to not because I have to.
  • Jimbo 2012/07/03 16:08:48
    No
    Jimbo
    +1
    I work part time at home and my wife works 8 hours a day and has done very well during the past 5 years.
  • morris44 Jimbo 2012/07/03 18:36:14
    morris44
    +2
    Good news. What industries are you in?
  • Jimbo morris44 2012/07/03 19:00:22
    Jimbo
    +1
    Sales Rep. for failure analysis equipment.
  • morris44 Jimbo 2012/07/03 21:24:41
    morris44
    +2
    Is that medical?
  • Jimbo morris44 2012/07/03 21:28:22
    Jimbo
    +2
    We sell mostly to semiconductor manufactures. We also sell to colleges and solar panel manufactures.
  • KrSpo 2012/07/03 15:18:32
    Yes
    KrSpo
    +3
    But there again, IT folks are generally expected to work after hours without additional pay. It's jacked up, but it's the business.
  • Sperry23 2012/07/03 15:12:02
    Yes
    Sperry23
    +3
    I have friends who talked to their supervisors about having to do the job of two or more people. They were told that if they didn't like the conditions, there were lots of people who would gladly take their job for less money. Meanwhile the rich just keep getting richer.
  • susan 2012/07/03 15:08:05
    Yes
    susan
    +2
    Fewer and fewer of us are working. The workforce, as calculated by the government, has DROPPED to 63%, the fewest since 1981. (That's how the government keeps the unemployment statistics lower, btw.)
    The marketplace of barter and cash for work performed is growing. Small businesses remaining that have not been destroyed by the banks and government edict are hanging on by a thread, afraid to hire new employees, citing the costs of the Affordable Care Act and the intrusion of the new IRS regulators in their businesses.
  • Donnie susan 2012/07/04 03:36:42
    Donnie
    oh god the IRS is always adding more and more and never seems to stop; well more-so than most of the government.
  • susan Donnie 2012/07/04 12:52:58
    susan
    The Affordable Care Act - Obamacare - adds 17,000 IRS employees alone.
  • Donnie susan 2012/07/04 21:41:38
    Donnie
    +1
    how do they expect to pay them the only real option is print more money(obviously bad idea).
  • aneed2know susan 2012/07/05 07:34:42
    aneed2know
    liar
  • aneed2know susan 2012/07/05 07:34:32
    aneed2know
    BS, people are working more for less because companies have figured out that they can make just as much profit as they did before the recession hit, has nothing to do with the ACA, regulations or the IRS, nothing at all.
  • susan aneed2know 2012/07/05 15:38:39
    susan
    Small businesses and middle class businesses, the ones that historically have created the most jobs, are being forced out of business The regulations, the taxes and the burdens of government enforcement by ignorant officials who care nothing about the unintended consequences of their rulings devastate small businesses.
    Look at the requirements of ACA alone. The new IRS regulations under that act to enforce the penalty provisions are the most intrusive ever. New agents, 17,000 of them, will have to justify their existence by bullying small business AND their employees, levying fines and penalties on the slightest pretense. OSHA has done this for years, forcing any small business unlucky enough to be in the way of an overzealous bureaucrat out of business because they can't afford to fight
    {Example: a small contractor working on a small remodeling project recently was cited by OSHA because his employee plugged an electrical cord into a socket just inside the door of the building to do some work on the exterior. The regulator said the contractor should have installed a temporary electrical service outside. Fine: $60,000. He closed his doors, laid off his 5 employees, and went to work for a large contractor. Yes, he could have fought the fine and probably won, but the legal fees would have been at least as much as the fine, putting him out of business anyway. }
  • topcat128 susan 2012/07/05 17:48:41 (edited)
    topcat128
    +1
    THANK YOU!!!! I COULDN"T SAID IT BETTER.
  • aneed2know topcat128 2012/07/10 04:07:50 (edited)
    aneed2know
    what did she say, but a pile of BS, that wont be getting you laid.
  • aneed2know susan 2012/07/10 04:07:37
    aneed2know
    another useful idiot is what you are, there are no 17k IRS agents, No death panels, no chip implantation and none of that other crap you are talking about. And guess what if that contractor had followed regulations guess what, he would not have been fined and if he did lay off workers because of it (BIg if), then he was not a good contractor.

    But more important if i believed your story, which i don't, like my mother always said, " A hard head makes a soft behind"

    But i bet if some one was building your house, i bet you would want all those building codes and regulations, that i am willing to bet on.
  • susan aneed2know 2012/07/10 12:40:43 (edited)
    susan
    Read the two recent articles by AP writer Stephen Ohlemacher: http://www.salon.com/writer/s...

    Also, from this article: http://www.usatoday.com/money...

    "In 2010, House Ways and Means Committee Republicans issued a report saying the IRS may need as many as 16,500 additional auditors, agents and other employees "to investigate and collect billions in new taxes from Americans."

    As far as the contractor goes, that is just one example of the way the federal agents of many branches bully small businesses. They don't go after the larger ones that have the lawyers and financial capacity to fight. That small contractor (btw, a black man) was in compliance with the OSHA and all safety laws. If he had been able to afford the fight, he could have won in court, but the feds know that money and power always win.
  • Franklin 2012/07/03 14:55:45
    No
    Franklin
    +1
    There are people working more hours for the same pay thanks to rising cost of doing business ….and its only going to get worse as the Obamacare TAX kicks in -
  • "OG" 2012/07/03 14:43:13
    Yes
    "OG"
    +1
    I put in a minimum of 84 hrs a week
  • PrettieReptar 2012/07/03 14:35:18
    Yes
    PrettieReptar
    +2
    For those that are working, yes.
  • BigFig#9 2012/07/03 14:12:55
    Yes
    BigFig#9
    +4
    This is a very interesting area that needs more public debate... Not only does uncompensated (salaried) as well as compensated (hourly) overtime feed into this but so does the efficiencies and productivity of the information age.... Anecdotally we can see that few executives any more get admin assistants because our friends at Microsoft have developed all those wonderful Office Apps. We also can see that our friends at AT&T; and Verizon now ensure travel time can be productive time as well. Computers now control tool and die machines so a master machinist can do what 20 machinist used to do.

    So what's the answer? I'm not sure but I have some questions to ponder. About 100 years ago, a standard work week expectation was around 60 hours. Is there really anything special about calling 40 hours a standard work week? An additional thought - companies have qualified an increasing number of employees as 'exempt' (supposedly management and/or sales) in yet the reality of these positions is that to keep their positions these employees are virtually required to spend 50 or more hours at their jobs. Is it time to re-examine our guidelines for overtime eligibility? And a final thought - Americans get dismal vacation allowances compared to most peer OECD countries...Can we lear...
    This is a very interesting area that needs more public debate... Not only does uncompensated (salaried) as well as compensated (hourly) overtime feed into this but so does the efficiencies and productivity of the information age.... Anecdotally we can see that few executives any more get admin assistants because our friends at Microsoft have developed all those wonderful Office Apps. We also can see that our friends at AT&T; and Verizon now ensure travel time can be productive time as well. Computers now control tool and die machines so a master machinist can do what 20 machinist used to do.

    So what's the answer? I'm not sure but I have some questions to ponder. About 100 years ago, a standard work week expectation was around 60 hours. Is there really anything special about calling 40 hours a standard work week? An additional thought - companies have qualified an increasing number of employees as 'exempt' (supposedly management and/or sales) in yet the reality of these positions is that to keep their positions these employees are virtually required to spend 50 or more hours at their jobs. Is it time to re-examine our guidelines for overtime eligibility? And a final thought - Americans get dismal vacation allowances compared to most peer OECD countries...Can we learn from the 'happiest countries in the world' aka Denmark, Sweden and Norway where standard vacation allowances start at 4 weeks in addition to liberal job sharing, holiday and other time off policies?
    (more)
  • morris44 BigFig#9 2012/07/03 18:56:40
    morris44
    +4
    Good post, great points and questions to ponder.

    Productivity has increased much more than salaries over the last 40 years.

    Productivity gains are realized in dollars. Where are the dollars going?

    Executive pay, profits and dividends.
  • BigFig#9 morris44 2012/07/03 19:01:05
    BigFig#9
    +4
    Bingo - Financing income disparity and wealth disparity....What GREAT PLACES to invest! : )
  • aneed2know BigFig#9 2012/07/05 07:37:02
    aneed2know
    +1
    thank you i just read that at Truth out and alternet. thank you. And the sad fact is those American companies in the OECD countries are required by law to do it.
  • BigFig#9 aneed2know 2012/07/06 06:06:27
    BigFig#9
    +1
    And they do quite well doing business there BUT OF COURSE if they had to conduct business that way here IT WOULD BE DISASTROUS..... A CALAMITY!!!!!
  • politicalsoldier 2012/07/03 14:06:46
    Yes
    politicalsoldier
    +1
    After things pick up a little in a company after cuts have been made, there's more work there but the companies are still not confident enough to hire right away. Which is understandable in this very unstable economy and anti business climate with the uncertainty of higher taxation and a government healthcare plan that will destroy many small businesses, or at least make them dump all coverage they provide to their employees. That, and the fact that the many more fees, taxes, and regulations placed on businesses by the current administration have made it much more expensive to do business, so they need to cut overhead expenses to do the same amount of business.

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