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Words, Words, & More Words & Definitions Game!

Related Topics: Fun

This is my own idea so let's have fun...."Let the Games Begin!"

Rules: I will start with a word & I will give the first comment
so you can see how it is done. I give the definition to the
word give and give a new word for the next person. One
turn at a time, please. & wait until someone else gives a
new word.

Any word can be used, just play nice & remember we have
teenagers that play. Please..no politics here! I blog on the
political questions & blogs but come to the games for fun.

If you care to chit-chat with players & post pictures, feel
free to do so. I am a very outgoing person & like to
interact with other players ....I know some of you do too.

I will not block anyone unless it is absolutely necessary!
If I have a problem with anything, I'll send you a private
email on SH.

We will start with easy words, then as the game goes along,
we will have harder words....I am sure. So if you need a
dictionary...that is alright.

First Word: Happy

You!
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Top Opinion

  • Jenni 2010/08/05 05:54:35
    Jenni
    +12
    Ambivalent: simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings (as attraction and repulsion) toward an object, person, or action.

    New Word: Prosy.

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  • Joe61 15 hours ago
    Joe61
    Limosis: (From Ancient Greek word limos meaning hunger) A ravenous appetite caused by disease; excessive and morbid hunger

    New Word: Fideism
  • Marianne 20 hours ago
    Marianne
    +1
    Limerance (or limerence): it is a kind of "crave", which may turn into obsession, i.e. an involuntary state of mind caused by a romantic attraction to somebody, combined with the obsessive, overwhelming need for reciprocated feelings (it is an automatic reaction, resp. an attraction, which does not depend on an individual's decision)

    New Word: limosis
  • Joe61 1 day ago
    Joe61
    +1
    Vinblastine: Is a chemotherapy drug used to treat different cancers, including lymphomas, bladder, breast and testicular cancer, and Kaposi's sarcoma.

    New Word: Limerance
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 1 day ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +2
    Trophotropism: Movement of living cells toward or away from nutritive material.

    New Word: Vinblastine.
  • Marianne 1 day ago
    Marianne
    +2
    Trudgen: a swimming stroke sometimes known as the racing stroke, or the East Indian stroke (from native swimmers), a side stroke, which developed into the "front crawl", and what would become known as freestyle. It is named after the English swimmer John Trudgen.
    Citing:
    One swims mostly upon one side, making an overhand movement, lifting the arms alternately out of the water. When the left arm is above the head, the legs spread apart for a kick; as the left arm comes down the legs extend and are then brought together with a sharp scissor kick. The right arm is now brought forward over the water, and as it comes down the left arm is extended again. The scissor kick comes every second stroke; it involves spreading the legs, then bringing them together with a sudden "snap" movement.
    The swimmer's face is underwater most of the time; the only chance to breathe is when the hand is coming back and just as the elbow passes the face.

    New Word: trophotropism
  • Joe61 1 day ago
    Joe61
    +2
    Inconcinnity: Means To have, a lack of congruity or harmony; unsuitability.
    Its origin is from the Latin word inconcinnitas and first known use: circa 1616

    New Word: Trudgen
  • Marianne 1 day ago
    Marianne
    +2
    Incommode: to inconvenience, disturb, trouble, discomfort, hinder, impede, obstruct, bother, ...
    from French incommoder (around 16th century): to bother, disturb, inconvenience, discommode, sicken; from Latin: incommodare (to be troublesome) - in (not) + commodus (convenient). Remark:
    Remembering historical records about Commodus, i.e. Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Augustus, this Roman emperor was rather the opposite of "convenient".

    New word: inconcinnity
  • Joe61 2 days ago
    Joe61
    +2
    Pediluvium: A bath for the feet or washing bathing the feet. Ending in vium would suggest the word had Latin origins, with possible biblical connections. As the bathing of guests feet on entering a house, was a bit of a welcoming ritual back in the days.

    New Word: Incommode
  • Marianne 2 days ago
    Marianne
    +2
    Predella: a platform or step, on which an altar stands, which is significant in art history; in painting, it refers to the paintings and sculptures at the bottom the altar piece
    (from Langobardic predel or pretel = long wooden platform, that serves as a basis in a piece of furniture)

    New Word: pediluvium
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 2 days ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +2
    Glabella: The smooth prominence between the eyebrows.

    New Word: Predella.
  • Joe61 3 days ago
    Joe61
    +2
    Sabretache: Is a flat leather case formerly worn suspended on the left from the saber belt by men of some cavalry units. Used by light cavalry, this big "pocket" was not very useful in carrying anything securely . It was mostly a protection for the left leg of the cavalryman, and also a nice decorative piece for very particular uniforms and where not specific to light cavalry, but also mounted artillery and some staff officers.

    Nerw Word: Glabella
  • Marianne 3 days ago
    Marianne
    +2
    sockdologer or sockdolager
    a decisive impact or act, i.e. a heavy blow, decisive remark, conclusive answer, etc., that ends a matter or causes a change;
    an outstanding person or an exceptional thing;
    a battle-wagon, for example such as formerly used by Prussian forces from the 15th to the 19th century,
    today seen as descriptions of weather, like of thunderstorms, resp. when occurring in large fronts or clusters, referred to individually
    American slang, coined in early 19th century, of uncertain origin, eventually from sock (to give somebody a blow) + doxology (a praise or hymn to God, intended to be sung or chanted as the closing of a church service)

    Citing:
    1) A writer in the March Atlantic gives this as the origin of the slang word “socdollager,” current some time ago. “Socdollager” was the uneducated man’s transposition of “doxologer,” which was the familiar New England rendering of “doxology.” This was the Puritan term for the verse ascription used at the conclusion of every hymn, like the “Gloria,” at the end of a chanted psalm. On doctrinal grounds it was proper for the whole congregation to join in the singing, so that it became a triumphant winding up of the whole act of worship. Thus is happened that “socdollager” became the term for anything which left nothing e...



    sockdologer or sockdolager
    a decisive impact or act, i.e. a heavy blow, decisive remark, conclusive answer, etc., that ends a matter or causes a change;
    an outstanding person or an exceptional thing;
    a battle-wagon, for example such as formerly used by Prussian forces from the 15th to the 19th century,
    today seen as descriptions of weather, like of thunderstorms, resp. when occurring in large fronts or clusters, referred to individually
    American slang, coined in early 19th century, of uncertain origin, eventually from sock (to give somebody a blow) + doxology (a praise or hymn to God, intended to be sung or chanted as the closing of a church service)

    Citing:
    1) A writer in the March Atlantic gives this as the origin of the slang word “socdollager,” current some time ago. “Socdollager” was the uneducated man’s transposition of “doxologer,” which was the familiar New England rendering of “doxology.” This was the Puritan term for the verse ascription used at the conclusion of every hymn, like the “Gloria,” at the end of a chanted psalm. On doctrinal grounds it was proper for the whole congregation to join in the singing, so that it became a triumphant winding up of the whole act of worship. Thus is happened that “socdollager” became the term for anything which left nothing else to follow; a decisive, overwhelming finish, to which no reply was possible.

    2) As well as its literal meaning of a heavy or knock-down blow, sockdolager also came to mean something that was exceptional in any respect, especially, the OED says, a particularly large fish; one sense given in an edition of Bartlett’s dictionary in 1848 was “a type of fish hook”. James Fenimore Cooper wrote in 1838 in Home as Found: “There is but one ‘sogdollager’ in the universe, and that is in Lake Oswego”.

    New Word: sabretache
    (more)
  • Joe61 4 days ago
    Joe61
    +2
    Absquatulate, meaning to make off, decamp, or abscond. An American word from the 1830s.....a period of great vigour and expansiveness in the US....was also a decade of inventiveness in language, featuring a fashion for word play, and obscure abbreviations, fanciful coinages, and puns. Only a few inventions of that period have survived to our modern times.

    New Word: Sockdologer
  • Marianne Joe61 3 days ago
    Marianne
    +1
    Bravo!
  • Marianne 4 days ago
    Marianne
    +2
    Affray:
    a fray, brawl, alarm, terror, fright, scare; the act of suddenly disturbing any one; a tumultuous assault, attack, fight or quarrel.
    The fighting of two or more persons, in a public place, to the terror of others.

    Citing jurisdiction:
    An affray is a type of Disorderly Conduct and
    a breach of the peace since it is conduct that disturbs the peace of the community.
    It is punishable by a fine, imprisonment, or both.
    According to criminal law:
    The fighting of two or more persons, in some public place, to the terror of the people.
    - To constitute this offence there must be, 1st, a fighting; 2d, the fighting must be between two or more persons; 3d, it must be in some public place ; 4th, it must be to the terror of the people.
    - It differs from a riot, it not being premeditated; for if any persons meet together upon any lawful or innocent occasion, and happen on a sudden to engage in fighting, they are not guilty of a riot but an affray only; and in that case none are guilty except those actually
    engaged in it. Hawk. b. 1, c. 65, s. 3 ; 4 Bl. Com. 146; 1 Russell, 271.

    From the Middle English afraien (“to terrify, frighten”), from Anglo-Norman afrayer (to terrify, disquiet, disturb), from Old French effreer, esfreer (to disturb, remove the peace from)

    New Word: absquatulate
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 5 days ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +2
    Jennet: A small Spanish horse.

    New Word: Affray.
  • Marianne 5 days ago
    Marianne
    +2
    jargogle (verb, to ...)
    to jumble, confuse, bamboozle, mix things up, befuddle, mess up, ...

    New Word: jennet
  • Joe61 6 days ago (edited)
    Joe61
    +2
    Tacent, IS an obsolete word meaning: to be silent, quiet, hold ones(tongue) peace
    The word comes from Latin word tacentem, a derivative. of tacere meaning to be silent.

    New Word: Jargogle
  • K-ZOOMI... Joe61 6 days ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +2
    Next word?
  • Marianne 6 days ago
    Marianne
    +2
    tritavus: male ascendant in the sixth degree (so called among the Romans)
    from Latin avus = grandfather and Latin prefix tri- = three times

    New Word: tacent
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 142 Next » Last »

About Me

Little Angel

Little Angel

Longmont, CO, US

2009/04/15 19:15:53

Trying to write again..so many ideas!..

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