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Words, Words, & More Words & Definitions Game!

Related Topics: Fun

This is my own idea so let's have fun...."Let the Games Begin!"

Rules: I will start with a word & I will give the first comment
so you can see how it is done. I give the definition to the
word give and give a new word for the next person. One
turn at a time, please. & wait until someone else gives a
new word.

Any word can be used, just play nice & remember we have
teenagers that play. Please..no politics here! I blog on the
political questions & blogs but come to the games for fun.

If you care to chit-chat with players & post pictures, feel
free to do so. I am a very outgoing person & like to
interact with other players ....I know some of you do too.

I will not block anyone unless it is absolutely necessary!
If I have a problem with anything, I'll send you a private
email on SH.

We will start with easy words, then as the game goes along,
we will have harder words....I am sure. So if you need a
dictionary...that is alright.

First Word: Happy

You!
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Top Opinion

  • Jenni 2010/08/05 05:54:35
    Jenni
    +12
    Ambivalent: simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings (as attraction and repulsion) toward an object, person, or action.

    New Word: Prosy.

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Opinions

  • Marianne 3 hours ago
    Marianne
    Wassail: an early English toast to someone's health, a festive or drinking song or glee, usually at a festival, or the salute "Waes Hail", an integral part of wassailing, an ancient southern English drinking ritual intended to ensure a good cider apple harvest the following year
    the drink served during a wassail, a hot, mulled punch often associated with Yuletide, made of cider, ale or wine flavoured with spices, sugar, roasted or baked apples, etc., traditionally served in a large bowl especially at Christmastime
    Middle English wæs hæil, washayl = be you healthy, from Old Norse ves heill = be well, from ves (imperative singular of vera = to be) + heill = healthy

    New Word: wallop
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 10 hours ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +1
    Nare: Nostril.

    New Word: Wassail.
  • Marianne 1 day ago
    Marianne
    +1
    Nihilarian: (pejorative): a purported school of thought dealing with trivial matters
    Hyphenation of nihil (from Latin nihil = nothing, absence of anything. i.e. nihilum: ne- = not and hilum = a trifle, a bagatelle) + -arian (suffix forming adjectives and nouns, from Latin suffix arius = having a concern or belief in a specified thing)

    New Word: nare
  • Ms Missy 1 day ago
    Ms Missy
    +2
    Talpidae - I remember that from Biology i think that means members of the mole family. cute mole
    New word: Nihilarian
  • Marianne Ms Missy 1 day ago
    Marianne
    Correct:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    including, for instance, a curiosity like the:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    Condylura cristata
  • Marianne 1 day ago
    Marianne
    +1
    Zapodidae: a widely distributed family of myomorph rodents that includes the jumping mice of North America and related Old World mice
    New Latin, from Zapod- + -idae (Zapus, i.e. type genus) from the Greek word πούς (pous, podos = foot) using the Greek prefix ζα- = za-

    New Word: Talpidae
  • raine 1 day ago (edited)
    raine
    +1
    Unhappy here because I feel the worl to expects everyone except the fools that had them to change our lives lbecause o their GD f kids!!!No kid should be on this site and if they are too bad for them, there is a toss rule no one under 13. So if they get hurt hurrah maybe they will just stay away. kids suck
  • K-ZOOMI... raine 1 day ago
  • Marianne raine 1 day ago
    Marianne
    I am sorry to see you so unhappy and angry. I am not joking or making fun of you. If you suspect cases of bad jokes or worse, ask your SH support for advice; they will find a solution.

    Many adults, who are supposed to give the "good example" are worse than children - and haven't all of us been children? There will always be black sheep of all ages, even in the best groups, societes and organisations. If you need somebody to discuss with about whether to admit children to internet communities or not, to set age or access limits, it would be useful to consult parents, teachers, educational experts, psychologists and other professionels and non-professionals - and the kids themselves.

    And if you tried to take part in this game and have fun?

    It is a nice way to use, enrich and remember your vocabulary:

    Rules: I will start with a word & I will give the first comment
    so you can see how it is done. I give the definition to the
    word give and give a new word for the next person. One
    turn at a time, please. & wait until someone else gives a
    new word.

    Any word can be used, just play nice & remember we have
    teenagers that play. Please..no politics here! I blog on the
    political questions & blogs but come to the games for fun.

    If you care to chit-chat with players & post pictures, feel
    free to do so. I am...&











    I am sorry to see you so unhappy and angry. I am not joking or making fun of you. If you suspect cases of bad jokes or worse, ask your SH support for advice; they will find a solution.

    Many adults, who are supposed to give the "good example" are worse than children - and haven't all of us been children? There will always be black sheep of all ages, even in the best groups, societes and organisations. If you need somebody to discuss with about whether to admit children to internet communities or not, to set age or access limits, it would be useful to consult parents, teachers, educational experts, psychologists and other professionels and non-professionals - and the kids themselves.

    And if you tried to take part in this game and have fun?

    It is a nice way to use, enrich and remember your vocabulary:

    Rules: I will start with a word & I will give the first comment
    so you can see how it is done. I give the definition to the
    word give and give a new word for the next person. One
    turn at a time, please. & wait until someone else gives a
    new word.

    Any word can be used, just play nice & remember we have
    teenagers that play. Please..no politics here! I blog on the
    political questions & blogs but come to the games for fun.

    If you care to chit-chat with players & post pictures, feel
    free to do so. I am a very outgoing person & like to
    interact with other players ....I know some of you do too.

    I will not block anyone unless it is absolutely necessary!
    If I have a problem with anything, I'll send you a private
    email on SH.

    We will start with easy words, then as the game goes along,
    we will have harder words....I am sure. So if you need a
    dictionary...that is alright.


    Have a nice day!
    (more)
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 1 day ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +1
    Labefaction: A shaking or weakening; overthrow or downfall.

    New Word: Zapodidae.
  • Marianne K-ZOOMI... 1 day ago (edited)
    Marianne
    +1
    Thank you, K-Zoomi!

    Also for your musical contribution!
  • Marianne 2 days ago
    Marianne
    +1
    laconic: using or marked by the use of few words, terse or concise, brief and to the point, effectively cut short
    from Latin Lacōnicus (a Spartan from Laconia), from Greek Λακωνικός (Lakōnikos), from Lakōn, a Spartan from Laconia, (from the reputation of the Spartans for brevity of speech)

    New Word: labefaction
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 2 days ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +1
    Gabby: Talkative, Garrulous.

    New Word: Laconic.
  • dumfcuk 3 days ago
    dumfcuk
    +1
    sab·bat

    noun, often capitalized \ˈsa-bət\

    Definition of SABBAT


    1

    : witches' sabbath


    2

    : any of eight neo-pagan religious festivals commemorating phases of the changing seasons


    Origin of SABBAT

    French, literally, sabbath, from Latin sabbatum
    First Known Use: 1652
  • Marianne 3 days ago
    Marianne
    +1
    glaucope: person with fair hair and blue eyes
    from γλαυκός (glaukós = light blue, gleaming, bright) and ὤψ (-ops) - referring to Greek mythology

    New Word: gabby
  • K-ZOOMI-----0 3 days ago
    K-ZOOMI-----0
    +1
    Paeon: A metrical foot of four syllables with one long and three short syllables (as in classical prosody) or with one stressed and three unstressed syllables (as in English prosody).

    New Word: Glaucope.
  • Marianne 3 days ago (edited)
    Marianne
    +1
    Add:
    Sabbat: (1645-55; from French, i.e. special use of sabbat (resp. Sabbath):
    - meeting of witches, i.e. witches' sabbath ................................ mentioned)
    - any of eight neo-pagan religious festivals commemorating phases of the changing seasons
    French, literally, sabbath, from Latin sabbatum; first Known Use 1652

    Formerly:
    Sabbat or Sabbath (from the French form of the Hebrew word "Shabbat"): first day of the week (Sunday), the Day of the Lord, according to Christian traditions, although it was, originally, the Saturday (Sambati Dies or the Day of Sabbat);

    a meeting of witches, i.e. "witches' sabbath", 1650s, special application of the French form of sabbath.

    and

    Sabbath or Shabbat (Hebrew: שַׁבָּת‎, "rest" or "cessation") or Shabbos (Yiddish: שאבּעס) (English: Sabbath) is the Jewish day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. The traditional Jewish position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution...



    Add:
    Sabbat: (1645-55; from French, i.e. special use of sabbat (resp. Sabbath):
    - meeting of witches, i.e. witches' sabbath ................................ mentioned)
    - any of eight neo-pagan religious festivals commemorating phases of the changing seasons
    French, literally, sabbath, from Latin sabbatum; first Known Use 1652

    Formerly:
    Sabbat or Sabbath (from the French form of the Hebrew word "Shabbat"): first day of the week (Sunday), the Day of the Lord, according to Christian traditions, although it was, originally, the Saturday (Sambati Dies or the Day of Sabbat);

    a meeting of witches, i.e. "witches' sabbath", 1650s, special application of the French form of sabbath.

    and

    Sabbath or Shabbat (Hebrew: שַׁבָּת‎, "rest" or "cessation") or Shabbos (Yiddish: שאבּעס) (English: Sabbath) is the Jewish day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. The traditional Jewish position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins. Variations upon Shabbat are widespread in Judaism and, with adaptations, throughout the Abrahamic and many other religions.

    Old English sabat "Saturday as a day of rest," as observed by the Jews, from Latin sabbatum, from Greek sabbaton, from Hebrew shabbath, properly "day of rest" from shabath, resp. shavat (שָׁבַת‎ = he rested, ceased work), spelling with -th attested from late 14c., not widespread until 16c.

    New Word: paeon
    (more)
  • dumfcuk Marianne 3 days ago
    dumfcuk
    NO! No! NO! The word was Sabbat, not Sabbath. No or...It's not misspelled. Get it right before you move on please. You may have to look in a dictionary, but I just googled it and got the exact same definition I claim.
  • Marianne dumfcuk 3 days ago (edited)
    Marianne
    You don't need to "yell" at me.

    According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary, 8th Edition (book), it is "sabbath" and according to Webster's New Encyclopedic Dictionary (book) too (etymology: from Old French and Old English sabbat, from Latin sabbatum, from Greek sabbaton, from Hebrew shabbat ...)
    French and German spelling: Sabbat

    French to English
    http://www.wordreference.com/...
    German to English
    http://www.dict.cc/?s=Sabbat
    Italian to English
    http://dictionary.reverso.net...
    Spanish to English
    http://www.spanishcentral.com...
    .....

    On-line links:
    http://www.oxforddictionaries...
    http://www.thesaurus.com/brow...
    http://www.thefreedictionary....
    http://dictionary.reference.c...
    http://www.thefreedictionary....

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki...
    You don't need to "yell" at me.

    According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary, 8th Edition (book), it is "sabbath" and according to Webster's New Encyclopedic Dictionary (book) too (etymology: from Old French and Old English sabbat, from Latin sabbatum, from Greek sabbaton, from Hebrew shabbat ...)
    French and German spelling: Sabbat

    French to English
    http://www.wordreference.com/...
    German to English
    http://www.dict.cc/?s=Sabbat
    Italian to English
    http://dictionary.reverso.net...
    Spanish to English
    http://www.spanishcentral.com...
    .....

    On-line links:
    http://www.oxforddictionaries...
    http://www.thesaurus.com/brow...
    http://www.thefreedictionary....
    http://dictionary.reference.c...
    http://www.thefreedictionary....

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki...
    (more)
  • dumfcuk 3 days ago
    dumfcuk
    +2
    Paean: noun, a song of joy, praise, or victory.

    New word: Sabbat
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About Me

Little Angel

Little Angel

Longmont, CO, US

2009/04/15 19:15:53

Trying to write again..so many ideas!..

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