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What is this called and where is it?

Mary Mary 2013/05/25 10:36:51
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  • Liz 2013/05/25 12:31:09
    I have no idea
    Liz
    I got nothing
  • Mary Mary Liz 2013/05/25 13:08:08
    Mary Mary
    +1
    Lol read other answers (cheat) lol
  • Liz Mary Mary 2013/05/25 20:58:58
    Liz
    I answered it before I looked..lol I should have cheated...lol
  • Mary Mary Liz 2013/05/25 13:10:02
    Mary Mary
    +1
    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be...









    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be grey Uluru a striking orange-red hue.
    FACT: The nearby Kata Tjuta (or Olgas) are said to originate from a similar time. They are thought to have originally been one massive monolith, as opposed to the 36 separate domes they are today – one of the lesser known Uluru facts. They are a part of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which was founded in 1950 as ‘Ayers Rock-Mount Olga National Park’, changing to its current title in 1995. The Aboriginals own the land, although the Australian government currently holds a 99-year lease.
    How Big Is Uluru?
    Uluru is…
    348 metres (1141 feet) high
    3.6 km long (2.2 miles)
    1.9 km wide (1.2 miles)
    9.4 km or 5.8 miles around the base
    covers 3.33 km2 (1.29 miles2)
    extends about several km/miles into the ground (no-one knows exactly how far)
    862.5 metres above sea level
    (more)
  • Liz Mary Mary 2013/05/25 20:59:39
    Liz
    It looks amazing and thanks I'll know for next time..lol
  • Lion Iron Zion 2013/05/25 12:03:10
    It's ...
    Lion Iron Zion
    Nameless in Nowhere LoL
  • Mary Mary Lion Ir... 2013/05/25 13:09:48
    Mary Mary
    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be...









    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be grey Uluru a striking orange-red hue.
    FACT: The nearby Kata Tjuta (or Olgas) are said to originate from a similar time. They are thought to have originally been one massive monolith, as opposed to the 36 separate domes they are today – one of the lesser known Uluru facts. They are a part of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which was founded in 1950 as ‘Ayers Rock-Mount Olga National Park’, changing to its current title in 1995. The Aboriginals own the land, although the Australian government currently holds a 99-year lease.
    How Big Is Uluru?
    Uluru is…
    348 metres (1141 feet) high
    3.6 km long (2.2 miles)
    1.9 km wide (1.2 miles)
    9.4 km or 5.8 miles around the base
    covers 3.33 km2 (1.29 miles2)
    extends about several km/miles into the ground (no-one knows exactly how far)
    862.5 metres above sea level
    (more)
  • awalsh 2013/05/25 11:38:18
    It's ...
    awalsh
    +3
    Uluru NT
  • Guru_T_Firefly 2013/05/25 11:31:09
    It's ...
    Guru_T_Firefly
    +3
    Ayer's Rock, Austrailia
  • flyingseaturtle BN 2013/05/25 11:28:53
    It's ...
    flyingseaturtle BN
    +2
    The Outback in Australia. Very beautiful but dangerous.
  • Mary Mary flyings... 2013/05/25 11:33:54
    Mary Mary
    +2
    Not so dangerous. :-)
  • flyings... Mary Mary 2013/05/25 11:43:10
    flyingseaturtle BN
    +1
    Red dog Australia
    I think it would be interesting to see this but seeing a statue of a dog that has a great story is quite silly.
  • Mary Mary flyings... 2013/05/25 11:47:05
    Mary Mary
    +2
    Have you seen Red Dog movie ?

    The true story of hitchhiking, people-loving adventurer Red Dog of Western Australia's Pilbara region has been adapted for the screen. Based on the book by British novelist Louis de Bernières, Red Dog the movie hit Australian cinemas in early August 2011.

    There's a statue of Red Dog in Dampier, Western Australia, welcoming people to the Outback town, and it was this statue which apparently started de Bernières, author of Corelli's Mandolin, which has also been turned into a movie, into writing the story of Red Dog.

    Red Dog was a fully paid member of the Transport Workers Union, an official member of the Dampier Salt Sports and Social Club, and had his own bank account.

    Red Dog was, of course, a dog, a red kelpie born in the mining town of Paraburdoo in 1971, and a much-loved member of the Pilbara community.

    Known simply as Red Dog, the red kelpie was known for stopping cars on the road by walking right in the path of an oncoming vehicle until it stopped and then he would hop in and travel to wherever the car driver was going.

    He took bus rides as well and, once, when a new driver pushed him off her bus, the passengers all disembarked in protest.

    Red Dog's travels bought him as far south as the Western Australia capital of Perth but mostly among the minin...


















    Have you seen Red Dog movie ?

    The true story of hitchhiking, people-loving adventurer Red Dog of Western Australia's Pilbara region has been adapted for the screen. Based on the book by British novelist Louis de Bernières, Red Dog the movie hit Australian cinemas in early August 2011.

    There's a statue of Red Dog in Dampier, Western Australia, welcoming people to the Outback town, and it was this statue which apparently started de Bernières, author of Corelli's Mandolin, which has also been turned into a movie, into writing the story of Red Dog.

    Red Dog was a fully paid member of the Transport Workers Union, an official member of the Dampier Salt Sports and Social Club, and had his own bank account.

    Red Dog was, of course, a dog, a red kelpie born in the mining town of Paraburdoo in 1971, and a much-loved member of the Pilbara community.

    Known simply as Red Dog, the red kelpie was known for stopping cars on the road by walking right in the path of an oncoming vehicle until it stopped and then he would hop in and travel to wherever the car driver was going.

    He took bus rides as well and, once, when a new driver pushed him off her bus, the passengers all disembarked in protest.

    Red Dog's travels bought him as far south as the Western Australia capital of Perth but mostly among the mining communities of the Pilbara and the coastal towns of Dampier, Port Hedland and Broome.

    He was quite well known as the Pilbara Wanderer.

    Red Dog is portrayed in the movie by the red kelpie Koko who bears a strong resemblance to Red Dog.

    De Bernières acknowledges his novel's sources as two factual accounts by Nancy Gillespie and Beverley Duckett, respectively, as well as press clippings in the Dampier and nearby Karratha local libraries. The people characters in the book (and the movie) were mostly fictionalised.

    Red Dog the movie stars American actor Josh Lucas and Australians Rachael Taylor and Noah Taylor and New Zealander Keisha Castle-Hughes. Red Dog is directed by Australian Kriv Stenders.

    The movie highlights the landscape and unique character of the Pilbara region as well as telling the story of Red Dog with humor and great affection.

    Red Dog died in 1979.

    The Dampier statue of Red Dog is inscribed:

    RED DOG
    The Pilbara Wanderer
    Died November 21st, 1979
    Erected By The Many Friends Made During His Travels
    (more)
  • flyings... Mary Mary 2013/05/25 11:50:08
    flyingseaturtle BN
    +1
    Yep. I loved that movie and I know it was based on a true story. ;-)
  • Mary Mary flyings... 2013/05/25 11:53:12
    Mary Mary
    +2
    I cried and cried :-) Aussie films are so true blue.
  • flyings... Mary Mary 2013/05/25 12:01:10
    flyingseaturtle BN
    +2
    I think that Aussies are awesome ;-)
  • Mary Mary flyings... 2013/05/25 12:03:11 (edited)
    Mary Mary
    +1
    I know most America's are :-) Tyu
  • Lorenz0 W. ElMenzo 2013/05/25 11:18:09
    It's ...
    Lorenz0 W. ElMenzo
    +2
    An Ant Hill! Somewhere Down-Under!

    ant hill
  • Michael McFascist 2013/05/25 10:54:35 (edited)
    It's ...
    Michael McFascist
    +1
    OK where is this and what's it called?



    Wow! Don't know exactly what I did wrong there...it's Black Rock Nevada...if you care.
  • Mary Mary Michael... 2013/05/25 11:07:42
    Mary Mary
    No idea
  • JMCC 2013/05/25 10:43:40
    It's ...
    JMCC
    +3
    Uluru, and its in the middle of bloomin nowhere! ;)
  • Mary Mary JMCC 2013/05/25 10:49:54
    Mary Mary
    +4
    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be...









    Lol
    Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:
    FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
    FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
    FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title
    FACT: Other facts on Uluru: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be grey Uluru a striking orange-red hue.
    FACT: The nearby Kata Tjuta (or Olgas) are said to originate from a similar time. They are thought to have originally been one massive monolith, as opposed to the 36 separate domes they are today – one of the lesser known Uluru facts. They are a part of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which was founded in 1950 as ‘Ayers Rock-Mount Olga National Park’, changing to its current title in 1995. The Aboriginals own the land, although the Australian government currently holds a 99-year lease.
    How Big Is Uluru?
    Uluru is…
    348 metres (1141 feet) high
    3.6 km long (2.2 miles)
    1.9 km wide (1.2 miles)
    9.4 km or 5.8 miles around the base
    covers 3.33 km2 (1.29 miles2)
    extends about several km/miles into the ground (no-one knows exactly how far)
    862.5 metres above sea level Uluru
    (more)
  • JMCC Mary Mary 2013/05/25 11:00:43
    JMCC
    +1
    ;)

    I spent a year in Oz in 89/90, and about six weeks of that in Alice Springs as did a leg from Adelaide all the way up to Darwin...

    Coming from the UK, I couldn't ever really get over the distances involved between things, nor the fact that these distances were through vast spaces of bugger all... LOL
  • Mary Mary JMCC 2013/05/25 11:09:00
    Mary Mary
    +2
    Lol it's a big bloody place huh Lol
  • JMCC Mary Mary 2013/05/25 11:19:07
    JMCC
    +2
    Yep...

    Nice to see my assessment immortalised on a map, I am guessing I was not the first to think that...!!!

    I landed in Perth, and took a bus to Sydney a couple of months later... Never again... 4 and a half DAYS???
  • Mary Mary JMCC 2013/05/25 13:09:03
    Mary Mary
    +1
    A BUS? Best way to see red dirt lol
  • JMCC Mary Mary 2013/05/25 13:15:19
    JMCC
    Tell me about it. What does Nullarbor mean in English?

    Isn't it "f*cking boring place" (at least that's what I was told ;)?
  • Mary Mary JMCC 2013/05/25 13:21:21
  • JMCC Mary Mary 2013/05/25 13:30:19
    JMCC
    I acclimatised to the heat quite quickly - and having now spent quite a lot of time in warm climates, I have never really acclimatised back to the cold (unfortunately).

    I would say it would be a toss up between Darwin and Perth as to which were my favourite cities. Both had so much going for them, and were so clean!

    Your husband works in the Pilbara? Would that be mining, petroleum or something else?
  • Mary Mary JMCC 2013/05/25 13:34:31
    Mary Mary
    +1
    Iron ore mining, he's an explosive operator. This will make you laugh my young son went to London February last year. All he took was a jacket t shirts shorts and one pair of jeans. Mum wasn't there to pack for him. HE FROZE lol he had to buy clothes over there. HE LOVED IT THOUGH
  • JMCC Mary Mary 2013/05/25 13:38:54
    JMCC
    It would have to be a pretty exceptional summer for someone from WA not to feel cold here...

    Rarely do the temperatures get up to 30 - even at the best of times.

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