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Now, more than ever, will you not vote for Obama?

stevmackey 2012/06/29 00:40:14
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He has created the greatest tax hogging bill. Wait till you see what you are going to pay for this monster. That si not counting the rights you will lose as an older American. What do you think?
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  • ProudProgressive 2012/06/30 01:49:17
    I disagree, here is what I think....
    ProudProgressive
    +20
    Just in the past week President Obama has been vindicated in his quest to improve the health care for every American AND seen the Republicans once again shoot themselves in the foot in their Eric Holder political witch hunt, Now more than ever before it is obvious to anyone with at least one functional brain cell that this country is in the best hands it has been in since April 12, 1945.

    hunt obvious functional brain cell country hands april 12 1945

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  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/04 18:16:56
    schjaz
    +1
    you said...ACA will not impose a tax on anyone but those who refuse to purchase insurance.
    do you see the problem? the word 'refuse'. the government will decide if you can afford it or not. they will tell you that you are refusing when you just don't have the money to pay for it. its just a big power grab to create government jobs and promote the socialist agenda.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/04 19:16:49
    Jeremiah
    Don't be silly. Why do you righties always resort to hyperbole if you think you might not like something?

    A suggestion. Read the law. It can be accessed on the Internet. The entire law is 2,400 pages, but you can easily find a synopsis, from the right, left or center. If I find a link I will forward it to you, but you might not trust one from me.

    If you cannot afford insurance coverage, you can receive it for free. The idea is to cover everyone, and some cannot afford it. But this part of the law is still two years away, so you have plenty of time to learn all about it.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/09 16:05:28
    schjaz
    You're so funny. My friends think I am a Leftie.

    My premiums have increased and my deductible has increased to $3,000/yr. since this stupid, overcomplicated law was passed. We are losing doctors already.
    Our taxes will increase AGAIN.

    There is no such thing as FREE. Somebody (taxpayers) pays for it or we, as a nation, borrow more.

    Its just no good. We need a plan but this one will not do it.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/09 17:48:36
    Jeremiah
    Who are your friends? I can set them straight.

    Nothing has happened to your premiums or deductibles because of ACA. That part will not go into effect until 2014.

    No doctors are leaving because of ACA. What would they do? Flip burgers? Haul garbage? I asked my doctor about that, and she isn't going anywhere.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/10 15:23:22
    schjaz
    Don't tell me nothing has happened. The keep your kids on the rolls till 26 has kicked in,etc....you know business and corporations esp. the vampire insurance companies work on expectation. Lots of doctors are telling ppl they cannot accept the medicare and medicaid because it only pays 80%. The government does not reimburse all their costs. Oblablah said we wouldn't lose our doctors. another lie.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/10 17:06:45
    Jeremiah
    Insurance companies often pay one-third of the amount they are billed, and the doctors must accept it if they want to remain in the network.

    When Medicare was passed in 1965, we head the same things from doctors, that they would leave their practices. But the hot air cooled, and there they still were, doing business as usual. What else were they going to do, dig ditches?

    Obama was right; we will not lose our doctors. For each one who would actually leave, the medical schools are turning out new graduates every year.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/03 06:05:14
    Jeremiah
    Where do you get that? Nothing is being taken from the backs of middle-class taxpayers. Is this the "21 new taxes" I keep hearing about, but which happen to be RW fabrications?
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/03 17:33:38
    schjaz
    +1
    I don't know about 21 new taxes. Never heard that before but...this article is from 2010. I haven't found an updated one yet.

    We’ve been working to document the actual details of the health care legislation in Congress for months, not just the Democrat’s intent mind you, but the actual details. Now, Americans for Tax Reform has published a comprehensive list of tax hikes.

    The full bill – H.R. 3590 – is available here. Understand we do not have any new legislative text we can review since changes to H.R. 3590 – the Senate version of health care legislation – is again being done on the down-low.

    The bill Congress and the president has been talking about for the past few days is vapor-legislation – it does not exist. So the only thing we have for review – with about 72 hours to go – is H.R. 3590.

    Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) has a Web version and I’ve grabbed the PDF version (275 KB) for your convenience. Please go over to the ATR Web site and review the post. Along with an individual mandate excise tax if you refuse to buy into a qualified plan (whatever that ends up being), we’ve got a increase in the Medicare tax (from 2.9 percent to 3.8 percent) for individuals making more than $200,000.

    If you think you won’t be affected by that Medicare tax increase since you’re...





    <






    I don't know about 21 new taxes. Never heard that before but...this article is from 2010. I haven't found an updated one yet.

    We’ve been working to document the actual details of the health care legislation in Congress for months, not just the Democrat’s intent mind you, but the actual details. Now, Americans for Tax Reform has published a comprehensive list of tax hikes.

    The full bill – H.R. 3590 – is available here. Understand we do not have any new legislative text we can review since changes to H.R. 3590 – the Senate version of health care legislation – is again being done on the down-low.

    The bill Congress and the president has been talking about for the past few days is vapor-legislation – it does not exist. So the only thing we have for review – with about 72 hours to go – is H.R. 3590.

    Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) has a Web version and I’ve grabbed the PDF version (275 KB) for your convenience. Please go over to the ATR Web site and review the post. Along with an individual mandate excise tax if you refuse to buy into a qualified plan (whatever that ends up being), we’ve got a increase in the Medicare tax (from 2.9 percent to 3.8 percent) for individuals making more than $200,000.

    If you think you won’t be affected by that Medicare tax increase since you’re under the $200,000 cap, you don’t understand business management or economics. That money has to come from somewhere to be paid out, and you can bet it does not grow on trees. Everyone will be hit by that change.

    But there is more…

    Flexible Spending Account Cap – aka “Special Needs Kids Tax” (Page 1999/Sec. 9005/$14 bil/Jan 2011): Imposes cap on FSAs of $2500 (now unlimited). Indexed to inflation after 2011 (added on page 363 of manager’s amendment). There is one group of FSA owners for whom this new cap will be particularly cruel and onerous: parents of special needs children. There are thousands of families with special needs children in the United States, and many of them use FSAs to pay for special needs education. Tuition rates at one leading school that teaches special needs children in Washington, D.C. (National Child Research Center) can easily exceed $14,000 per year. Under tax rules, FSA dollars can be used to pay for this type of special needs education.

    Tax on Medical Device Manufacturers (Page 2020/Sec. 9009/$19.2 bil/Jan 2010): Medical device manufacturers employ 360,000 people in 6000 plants across the country. This bill would impose a new $2 billion annual tax on the industry imposed relative to shares of sales made that year. Exempts items retailing for <$100. Rises to $3 billion annually in 2017 (updated by page 364 of manager’s amendment).

    Tax on Innovator Drug Companies (Page 2010/Sec. 9008/ $22.2 bil/Jan 2010): $2.3 billion annual tax on the industry imposed relative to share of sales made that year.

    Tax on Health Insurers (Page 2026/Sec. 9010/$59.6 bil/Jan 2011): $10 billion annual tax on the industry imposed relative to health insurance premiums collected that year. Phases in gradually until 2017. Fully-imposed on firms with $50 million in profits (updated on page 365 of manager’s amendment)

    Elimination of tax deduction for employer-provided retirement Rx drug coverage in coordination with Medicare Part D (Page 2034/Sec. 9012/$5.4 bil/Jan 2011)
    http://radioviceonline.com/li...
    (more)
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/04 00:15:48
    Jeremiah
    This is a blog from Grover Norquist's group, and they don't even reveal the name of the blogger, except to call him "Steve M." Most of it is nonsense, conjured up for hysterical effect. I am surprised you would use it.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/02 16:50:33
    schjaz
    +1
    Absolutely. The government cannot do it. Its too big and too inept. Here is the tip of the iceberg. From a physician....
    What we’re learning from the 21% Medicare pay cut to physicians that occurred today:

    * There really must be a cost-control crisis with Medicare and the only politically-acceptable way to implement those cost controls are by cutting working physicians’ payments.

    * There’s was widespread political support for blocking the scheduled pay cuts to doctors, but central government control moves very slowly. That’s because doing so is expensive. For now, doctors have been asked to hold on to our billings for about 10 days so they can put through another temporary patch that will further delay the cuts until October 1 (pg 107) as part of a jobs bill, paid for by stimulus funds.

    * If they are serious about not cutting physicians’ payments, Congress must get rid of the sustainable growth rate formula that keeps calling for the cuts and acknowledge that the country is going to be on the hook for billions of dollars in additional Medicare costs. Right now, that’s not sounding too popular. Better to stand by your plan and not mention these additional costs to the nation.

    * We also see that Congress will not commit to fiscal conservancy when it is politically ill-a...





    Absolutely. The government cannot do it. Its too big and too inept. Here is the tip of the iceberg. From a physician....
    What we’re learning from the 21% Medicare pay cut to physicians that occurred today:

    * There really must be a cost-control crisis with Medicare and the only politically-acceptable way to implement those cost controls are by cutting working physicians’ payments.

    * There’s was widespread political support for blocking the scheduled pay cuts to doctors, but central government control moves very slowly. That’s because doing so is expensive. For now, doctors have been asked to hold on to our billings for about 10 days so they can put through another temporary patch that will further delay the cuts until October 1 (pg 107) as part of a jobs bill, paid for by stimulus funds.

    * If they are serious about not cutting physicians’ payments, Congress must get rid of the sustainable growth rate formula that keeps calling for the cuts and acknowledge that the country is going to be on the hook for billions of dollars in additional Medicare costs. Right now, that’s not sounding too popular. Better to stand by your plan and not mention these additional costs to the nation.

    * We also see that Congress will not commit to fiscal conservancy when it is politically ill-advised to do so. Recall that the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula, part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 was enacted on August 5, 1997 to replace the Medicare Volume Performance Standard (MVPS). Section 1848(f)(2) of the Act specified the formula for establishing yearly SGR targets for physicians’ services under Medicare and was intended to control the growth in aggregate Medicare expenditures for physicians’ services. Since this formula to control Medicare costs is very likely to now be overturned, what does this say about other well-intentioned but politically unpopular policy initiatives planned to save costs in years ahead?

    * Policy decisions run by a single central body affect the entire United States and not just a portion of it. Sweeping legislation that affects the entire United States carries high risks to the nation as a whole if initial planning assumptions are incorrect.

    * As mentioned by others today, new primary care doctors are avoiding government healthcare because it cannot cover their costs. Even large institutions like Mayo clinic have done the math and aren’t taking Medicare patients at some of their primary care sites. As others follow suit, this will put further strain on primary care physician availability.

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2...
    (more)
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/02 17:25:14
    Jeremiah
    +1
    All insurance companies and Medicare pay the providers what they believe their services are worth, and it is often about one-third of the fees charged. The taxpayers are paying 100% of the original billings for patients who check into the ER's.

    We hear many doctors will leave their practices because of ACA. Those of us who are old enough remember the same kind of talk when Medicare was passed.

    Where will they go? Flipping burgers at McDonald's? Hauling garbage? The medical schools are turning out new graduates every year, bright young doctors who would love to step in for all the older doctors supposedly leaving their practices.

    I asked my doctor if she was planning to leave her practice, and she laughed at the idea.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/02 17:29:12
    schjaz
    +1
    this is going to be very disappointing for you. the government is inept and cannot handle such a program. worse, it will impact the rest of us in a devastating manner. you'll see.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/02 17:43:39
    Jeremiah
    +1
    You should have more faith in your elected government. Most industrialized countries have single payer health care systems, where the governments control costs for care.

    Our system is by far the most expensive in the world, and we need to rein in the costs. The ideal solution would be Medicare Part E (for everyone).
  • jeane Jeremiah 2012/07/02 23:42:45
    jeane
    +2
    It is amazing that people who think we cannot afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, and medication somehow think that we can afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, medication and a government bureaucracy to administer it.

    It is hard to imagine a more stupid or more dangerous way of making decisions than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong.
    Thomas Sowell

    Very wise man.
  • Jeremiah jeane 2012/07/03 06:09:41
    Jeremiah
    +1
    Thomas Sowell is a right wing hack. So is Walter Williams, in case he was next on the list of contributors.
  • jeane Jeremiah 2012/07/04 01:00:42
    jeane
    +1
    Gosh - what a GREAT RIGHT WING HACK!

    Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930) is an American economist, social theorist, political philosopher, and author. A National Humanities Medal winner, he advocates laissez-faire economics and writes from a conservative and libertarian perspective. He is currently the Rose and Milton Friedman Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

    Sowell was born in North Carolina, but grew up in Harlem, New York. He dropped out of high school, and served in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War. He received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University in 1958 and a master's degree from Columbia University in 1959. In 1968, he earned his doctorate degree in Economics from the University of Chicago.

    Sowell has served on the faculties of several universities, including Cornell and University of California, Los Angeles, and worked for think tanks such as the Urban Institute. Since 1980 he has worked at the Hoover Institution. He is the author of more than 30 books. THOMAS SOWELL
  • Jeremiah jeane 2012/07/04 19:55:02
    Jeremiah
    I have read many of his columns, and I repeat the assessment.
  • jeane Jeremiah 2012/07/04 21:42:53
    jeane
    Yes I know and I am not surprised in the least.
  • jeane Jeremiah 2012/07/04 01:12:39 (edited)
    jeane
    +1
    Another great African-American

    Walter E. Williams


    Dr. Walter E. Williams, PhD; is an American economist, commentator, and academic. He is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, as well as a syndicated columnist and author known for his libertarian views.
  • Jeremiah jeane 2012/07/04 19:55:30
    Jeremiah
    I have read many of his columns too, and the same assessment applies.
  • jeane Jeremiah 2012/07/04 21:37:34
    jeane
    +1
    It does not surprise me
  • Jeremiah jeane 2012/07/04 21:47:52
    Jeremiah
    I hope you are having a nice 4th.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/05 17:56:03
    schjaz
    And if I would say that, you and plenty of others on SH would jump all over me and call me a racist. Its happening on another posted question right now. I am being called filthy names as well. But liberals can do it all day long and its fine.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/05 18:30:10
    Jeremiah
    Have I called you names? Have I called you a racist? We are having a conversation, you and I, and so far it has been civil. Let's keep it that way, and not bring other people's nastiness into it.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/06 16:47:50
    schjaz
    If I had said what you said to Jean, I would be called a racist.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/06 19:39:57
    Jeremiah
    What did I say that was racist?
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/08 16:19:46
    schjaz
    nothing....you disagreed with what blacks said..but my point is that if I had done it, I would be called racist by progressives.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/09 04:37:58
    Jeremiah
    I often disagree with many people, my friends included. Some of them might be African Americans.

    I would not call you a racist, judging from what I have seen so far.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/09 16:06:19
    schjaz
    +1
    ok...just sayin.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/09 17:49:16
    Jeremiah
    +1
    OK, take care friend. :-)
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/04 18:21:40
    schjaz
    +1
    That's just it, isn't it? Fool me once, shame on you.....so I should let you fool me twice? No, I do not have faith in the federal government. This stuff needs to be left to the states. I do not want socialism. Look at the ppl that need SS and cannot get it but then SS cuts a check to an alcoholic and/or druggy. Its messed up. And that is what the feds are good at.....screwing it up. They cannot run anything correctly. Redtape. BS.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/04 20:01:10 (edited)
    Jeremiah
    Sorry, I don't want my state controlling my health care. It has already cut off women's health, and our dim bulb of a governor has already said he will not participate in Medicaid. 25% of Texans have no coverage, the highest figure in the nation.

    Maybe your state can be trusted, but there are many that cannot. Health care needs to be a national program, since a large part of a government's mission is to provide protection for its people, protection from aggressors internal and external, and from illness and disease.

    For what it is worth, I have never had a problem with either Social Security or Medicare. Both have always been there when I have needed them.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/05 17:57:33
    schjaz
    You don't want the state controlling your health care but its fine for the Feds to do it? Jeremiah!!!!!
    Listen to yourself...............holy moly.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/05 18:31:30
    Jeremiah
    Let's say I trust the federal government and ACA far more than I trust the state of Texas. With Texas's record in these matters, do you blame me?
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/06 16:48:40
    schjaz
    Well, its reputation is better than the federal government.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/06 19:46:12
    Jeremiah
    Texas?? I don't think so. Even Texans don't believe that. Our record for education, health care, social services and others are at or near the bottom in the nation. Only states like Mississippi are in our category.

    Congress does not have a great reputation, particularly the House of Representatives. According to John Chambers, the chairman of S&P's rating committee, intransigence in the House was the cause of our credit rating being lowered from its previous AAA level. He said the Tea Partiers' willingness to allow the country to default on its obligations was a large part of the reason. Nations who lend money don't like to hear that sort of thing.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/07 16:38:15
    schjaz
    Anybody can say anything....they are not going to blame themselves for over borrowing and overspending.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/07 17:32:20
    Jeremiah
    The asylum that is now the House of Representatives is not about to blame themselves for anything. Their answer is to blame Obama for everything, when the fact is all money bills begin in the House.
  • schjaz Jeremiah 2012/07/08 16:20:50
    schjaz
    And the Repubs have constucted and the House has passed 20 jobs bills that are being ignored by the Senate.
  • Jeremiah schjaz 2012/07/09 04:41:37
    Jeremiah
    Every “jobs” bill passed by the House includes another juicy tax cut for the wealthy. They seem to think all they need to do is cut taxes for the rich and the corporations and the jobs will come flowing in.

    That is called supply-side, or trickle-down economics. It has never worked, and it never will.

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