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How much meat is there really in a McDonalds hamburger?

Kathleen 2010/06/18 18:39:25
Less than half I'm guessing.
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  • HJP23 2011/04/21 04:02:27
    HJP23
    +3
    My understanding of food laws is that a claim of "100% beef" in fact means exactly that. That is to say, of the meat used, all of that meat is 100% beef (not pork, game, dog, horse, etc). Unfortunately, it does not mean that the hamburger patty is made up ONLY of beef. There are soy meal products that are added that essentially "extend" the beef by giving it weight and volume, i.e. if a 2oz patty is 10% soy, not as much beef is required. The soy additives prevent the patty from overly shrinking during grilling or frying, by retaining fluids that give the patty its shape.

    The other thing to consider is that there is no indication what kind of beef is used. When we make hamburgers at home, we probably use ground beef from the store (ground sirloin, chuck, etc.) In the making of fast food "beef", there are no limitations, hence ears, snout, belly, etc. are all eligible and the virtually the entire animal is used.

    The same is true of hot dogs. I once visited a food processor who was a major hot dog supplier. Huge vats grind and heat the pig parts until they become a mush. I saw on operator pick up a snout and ear from the floor and heave it into the vat, explaining it was completely safe since the mixture would be sufficiently heated to kill bacteria. He didn't even consider that the snout and ear might be repulsive. Never had a dog since.

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  • HJP23 2011/04/21 04:02:27
    HJP23
    +3
    My understanding of food laws is that a claim of "100% beef" in fact means exactly that. That is to say, of the meat used, all of that meat is 100% beef (not pork, game, dog, horse, etc). Unfortunately, it does not mean that the hamburger patty is made up ONLY of beef. There are soy meal products that are added that essentially "extend" the beef by giving it weight and volume, i.e. if a 2oz patty is 10% soy, not as much beef is required. The soy additives prevent the patty from overly shrinking during grilling or frying, by retaining fluids that give the patty its shape.

    The other thing to consider is that there is no indication what kind of beef is used. When we make hamburgers at home, we probably use ground beef from the store (ground sirloin, chuck, etc.) In the making of fast food "beef", there are no limitations, hence ears, snout, belly, etc. are all eligible and the virtually the entire animal is used.

    The same is true of hot dogs. I once visited a food processor who was a major hot dog supplier. Huge vats grind and heat the pig parts until they become a mush. I saw on operator pick up a snout and ear from the floor and heave it into the vat, explaining it was completely safe since the mixture would be sufficiently heated to kill bacteria. He didn't even consider that the snout and ear might be repulsive. Never had a dog since.
  • Matt 2010/06/18 20:11:39
    Matt
    By U.S.D.A. law, hamburger is 100% beef products, spices may be added, but no fillers or extenders. McDonald's uses 100% foreign beef, mostly from third world countries. Not hardly the beef that we are used to tasting ! The meat is cheaper per pound than the soybeans that would be used to extend it !
  • Kathleen Matt 2010/06/18 21:20:07
    Kathleen
    +1
    Are cows in other countries that different from american cows?
  • Matt Kathleen 2010/06/18 22:14:57 (edited)
    Matt
    Very much so ! Genetics, age, gender, diet and climate conditions, along with how they are raised and slaughtered greatly effect what we taste ! I used to buy beef, by the boxcar load that originated in Australia, Venezuela, and Argentina. Back in 1971, I was paying per lb. anywhere from .11 to .23 for navel meat (lower on the animal high fat) .15 to .33 for boneless crops, and .55 to .70 for sirloin butts. Those were the three meats that we mixed together for hamburger. We mixed in 6% soy protein for the Red Barn chain, which doesn't sound like a lot but soybeans absorb about 10 times their weight in water.
  • Kathleen Matt 2010/06/18 22:17:23
    Kathleen
    +1
    OHH u no alot about beef, thats 4 sure! lol
  • Matt Kathleen 2010/06/18 22:27:18
    Matt
    Back in the late 1970's the USDA eliminated the prime grade and changed marbling standards to favor multinational corporations. Until they reinstated it, it was very difficult to even find an edible steak !
  • Kathleen Matt 2010/06/18 22:36:09
    Kathleen
    +1
    really? thats crzy
  • Errol Park 2010/06/18 19:51:15
    Errol Park
    Probably not much, why else would it taste so bad?
  • TaterSalad 2010/06/18 19:17:03
    TaterSalad
    It doesn't matter, i think it tastes good!
  • Kathleen TaterSalad 2010/06/18 19:19:27
    Kathleen
    ya, but most people actually like to know what there eating
  • TaterSalad Kathleen 2010/06/18 19:21:48
    TaterSalad
    If you really care then make your own hamburger meat at home and make your own burgers.
  • Kathleen 2010/06/18 18:49:35
    Kathleen
    It tastes so awesome but its probaley just filling
  • Melizmatic 2010/06/18 18:46:25
    Melizmatic
    Probably not a lot.
  • who? 2010/06/18 18:43:55

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2014/10/31 07:49:59

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