Quantcast

Spike Lee Says 'Django Unchained' is 'Disrespectful': Is He Overreacting?

Film 2012/12/24 16:51:50
You!
Add Photos & Videos
Spike Lee, the director famous for his films about race - like "Do the Right Thing" and "Malcolm X" - will not be going to see "Django Unchained."

He's never seen eye to eye with Quentin Tarantino, but in an interview with Vibe magazine Lee said that he "can't speak on" the "Pulp Fiction" director's latest film because he's "not gonna see it."



He has a problem with the film's use of slavery in its plot. Though the film does not paint slavery in a positive light, Lee says "it's disrespectful to my ancestors."

He later elaborated on Twitter, saying "American Slavery Was Not A Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western.It Was A Holocaust.My Ancestors Are Slaves. Stolen From Africa. I Will Honor Them."

When a fan said that "Django Unchained" is just a film and not to be taken seriously, Lee responded by saying "Wrong.Birth Of A Nation [notorious film that supported the Ku Klux Klan] Got Black Folks Lynced [sic]. Media Is Powerful."

Do you think that Spike Lee is overreacting?
Add a comment above

Top Opinion

  • abubincrazy 2012/12/24 23:31:50
    Yes
    abubincrazy
    +23
    Somebody tell Spike to get the hell over it.
    That America didn't invent slavery.
    And that blacks and others are still held as slaves in Africa and elsewhere.

Sort By
  • Most Raves
  • Least Raves
  • Oldest
  • Newest
Opinions

  • analogdog 2013/01/22 12:08:10
    Yes
    analogdog
    Disrespectful to whom? Him, since he wasn't in it? Spike Lee needs to go sit down somewhere.
  • Habz 2013/01/21 22:40:38
    Yes
    Habz
    I think i understand where he is coming from, it is obviously a personal and sensitive topic for him.
    I also completely agree with him about the power of media. Being a media student, i have come to recognize the traits and effects of media on society, but having not seen the film yet, i am not sure the response the film will have.
  • Pam 2013/01/19 17:49:19
    Yes
    Pam
    He is so off on this one, its not even amusing. He hasn't even seen the damn thing and he is going to make judgments on it? The character Django is very intellegent and strong, a very positive character. The movie takes place in the South before the Civil War, so negative images will be prevalent. Yes parts are hard to hear and watch but look at the time. Lee needs to see it or sit down and shut up.
  • Opal Marie 2013/01/17 18:47:39
    Yes
    Opal Marie
    his mad because Tarintino is white. HE is also mad because he didn't make the movie
  • persuasiontothenations 2013/01/05 02:46:27
    Yes
    persuasiontothenations
  • none 2012/12/29 20:44:08
    Yes
    none
    +1
    When he starts to complain about cRap music he may have a point worth listening to.
  • Trish none 2012/12/30 21:18:19
    Trish
    +1
    Articles on Spike Lee's criticism of gangsta rap

    -----------------------------...

    Spike urges a smarter kind of cool

    Educated blacks should be icons, filmmaker tells MTSU audience
    November 3, 2005
    Tennessean.com
    By KATE HOWARD Staff Writer

    Published: Thursday, 11/03/05 When controversial filmmaker Spike Lee was growing up in Brooklyn, he said last night, he aspired to be like the educated black men he saw reading books and going to college.

    Today the images in society glorified by gangsta rap - pimping and violence - are overtaking the role education should play, Lee said during a lecture at Middle Tennessee State University's Alumni Memorial Gym.

    "Young black kids didn't grow up wanting to be a pimp or a stripper like they do now," Lee said of his own youth. "You might think I'm making generalizations, but I don't think I am. That's how serious this stuff is."

    Speaking as part of MTSU's second biennial International Conference on Cultural Diversity, Lee had a message that basically was this: College-age students need to take the initiative not only to learn but to make it cool again to be intelligent. His appearance drew two standing ovations from the packed crowd.

    "When I was young, cats going to college got as much (love) as the ones who could rap or play...





































































































































    Articles on Spike Lee's criticism of gangsta rap

    -----------------------------...

    Spike urges a smarter kind of cool

    Educated blacks should be icons, filmmaker tells MTSU audience
    November 3, 2005
    Tennessean.com
    By KATE HOWARD Staff Writer

    Published: Thursday, 11/03/05 When controversial filmmaker Spike Lee was growing up in Brooklyn, he said last night, he aspired to be like the educated black men he saw reading books and going to college.

    Today the images in society glorified by gangsta rap - pimping and violence - are overtaking the role education should play, Lee said during a lecture at Middle Tennessee State University's Alumni Memorial Gym.

    "Young black kids didn't grow up wanting to be a pimp or a stripper like they do now," Lee said of his own youth. "You might think I'm making generalizations, but I don't think I am. That's how serious this stuff is."

    Speaking as part of MTSU's second biennial International Conference on Cultural Diversity, Lee had a message that basically was this: College-age students need to take the initiative not only to learn but to make it cool again to be intelligent. His appearance drew two standing ovations from the packed crowd.

    "When I was young, cats going to college got as much (love) as the ones who could rap or play ball," Lee said. "Back then, we were not called sellouts for using our brains. And being intelligent was not frowned upon."

    The whole world sees the culture that America exports, Lee said, and it's not this country's nuclear weapons that influence the world.

    "We are dominant in the world because of our culture," Lee said. "We can control the way people think and talk and dance, and that is how I define power."

    Many of hip-hop's heroes amount to minstrel performers in Lee's opinion. The pimping and gangsta personas are what sells right now, Lee said, and rappers may not be wearing blackface, but they are presenting an image of what it means to be black like minstrel shows of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Reggie Google, a recent MTSU graduate who was in the audience, agrees with Lee that this image is far from the truth.

    "If the record industry puts money behind it and we allow the media to run with it, we end up presenting the image that this is what it is to be black in America," Google said.

    Michelle Carter, a senior psychology major at Fisk University, said she agrees with Lee's message that hip-hop is dominating the vision of who black people are.

    "You can't look at rap and hip-hop and say, 'That's how black people are,' " Carter said. "Not all of us are like that."

    Lee said that his body of work, from his debut film She's Gotta Have It to Malcolm X to the documentary he's working on about Hurricane Katrina, intend to show just the opposite: the breadth of diversity of the black experience.

    "We do not all think and talk alike, and I've been struggling to get that message through Hollywood," Lee said. "And I will continue to bring that message."


    -----------------------------...

    Lee criticizes 'gangsta' culture
    November 3, 2005
    Shelbyville Times-Gazette
    By John I. Carney

    MURFREESBORO -- Filmmaker Spike Lee challenged minority students Thursday night to pursue their dreams and to fight against cultural or media messages which denigrate the value of education, saying many rap artists have done a disservice by promoting a culture of violence. Lee spoke at Middle Tennessee State University as part of its International Conference on Cultural Diversity.

    When Lee was in film school, there was only one active African-American director in Hollywood. Lee's first directorial effort, "She's Gotta Have It" (1986), along with Robert Townsend's "Hollywood Shuffle" (1987), ushered in a new wave of black filmmaking. But Lee says that while there are more films today by and about African Americans, many are "ghettoized" and rely too heavily on violence and stereotypes of "gangstas" and pimps.

    Lee described a billboard in Los Angeles promoting the current film "Get Rich or Die Trying" which featured rapper Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson holding a gun in one hand and a microphone in the other. Lee said that billboard sends young black men the message that there are only two ways to succeed: "get a record deal or shoot the s**t out of somebody, excuse my language." Lee said the billboard has since been removed after criticism from the black community.

    And the same messages are being promoted by many rap artists and, perhaps more important, by the record companies which determine what CDs get released. Lee said those negative stereotypes are just as damaging to white suburban teenagers, who are a key market for hip-hop CDs, as they are to black teenagers.

    "We've put pimps on a pedestal," he said. While Lee has met the rapper Snoop Dogg and likes him personally, he said the promotion of Snoop Dogg's pimp image in mainstream culture -- such as a Chrysler ad featuring Snoop Dogg with Lee Iacocca -- is a bad thing.

    Lee made the satirical comedy "Bamboozled" about a modern-day minstrel show, but he said current stereotypes are just as damaging.

    "Minstrels are still with us today," he said.

    "I love hip-hop," said Lee. "But there's certain things I'm just not going to get with." He said that when he was growing up, intelligence and education weren't looked down upon by his peers. But some aspects of popular culture as it relates to the black community now tend to denigrate anyone who speaks well or goes to college as having sold out.

    Lee said Kanye West is an example of a hip-hop artist who is thoughtful and whose lyrics address something higher than the culture of the street.

    'Positive people'
    Lee urged the college students in the audience to pursue their dreams, even in cases where family members do not understand. He said too many of his classmates wound up working for 20 years in jobs they hated because they were trying to please the family members who had sent them to college. In some cases, he said, those classmates were the first members of their family to ever go to college.

    "It has been my experience that parents kill more dreams than anybody," he said, though they do it without meaning to and often with the best of intentions.

    Lee, by comparison, followed his father and a grandfather to Morehouse College. (His mother and a grandmother had both gone to Spellman College.) He struggled with a vocation; after the second semester of his sophomore year, he had taken his general education courses and used up his electives and still didn't know what he wanted to do with his life.

    "Growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y., I had no idea I wanted to grow up and become a filmmaker," he said. He loved watching movies but gave no thought to the creative process that put them on screen. As a child, he dreamed of playing second base for the Mets.

    At home from college in Brooklyn, during the summer of 1977, he could not get a summer job and spent his time playing with a Super 8 movie camera he had received as a Christmas gift. When he returned to Morehouse in the fall, he chose a mass communications major and began taking film classes. His professor encouraged him to edit his Super 8 footage into a movie, and he did that. His classmates liked the 45-minute film, titled "Last Hustle In Brooklyn."

    "What's even more important, I got the response that I wanted," he said.

    Lee told the grandmother who had put him through Morehouse that he wanted to go to graduate film school at New York University, and she agreed to send him, a pivotal act of support given the expense of the program. Lee said his grandmother, now 99 and living in Atlanta, is not wealthy but saved the money she earned from 50 years working as an art teacher.

    "As a young person," he told his audience, "you have to surround yourself with positive people."

    Hard work
    Lee said the importance of film school was not the degree but the access to professional film equipment. NYU was where Lee began honing his craft, even though it would be years before his breakthrough directorial effort.

    Lee said today's young filmmakers have more options for honing their craft. Lee's "Bamboozled" was shot on consumer video cameras -- not professional equipment but a model which is sold to the public. He said some of his students edit films on laptop computers.

    "You have to roll up your sleeves and work hard," he said. He complained that reality TV gives young people the message that they can immediately be plucked from obscurity and made into a success.

    Lee's notable films include "Do The Right Thing," "Malcolm X," "School Daze," "Jungle Fever," "Bamboozled" and the documentary "4 Little Girls." His next film scheduled for release is "Inside Man," starring his frequent leading man Denzel Washington, whom Lee called "the world's greatest actor," as a New York Police Department hostage negotiator and Clive Owen as a bank robber who has taken hostages. This will be the fourth film that Lee and Washington have worked on together.

    Lee started work last Friday on a documentary for Home Box Office about Hurricane Katrina. He has interviewed evacuees living in New York and will travel to New Orleans to begin work there the day after Thanksgiving.

    Several Xavier students who were displaced by the hurricane and are now studying at Fisk University in Nashville identified themselves during the question-and-answer session following Lee's remarks and offered to show him scenes of destruction or put him in touch with people who were affected.

    Politics
    Lee attacked the notion that one cannot support the troops while criticizing the military effort in Iraq.

    "Somehow, if you speak against the war, it means automatically that you don't support the troops. That's crazy logic," he said.

    Lee complained that the divide between rich and poor is widening in America.

    "This country is slowly wiping out the middle class," he said, predicting that class will become more of a dividing factor than race in the years to come.

    "We're very good here in America at hiding the poor," he said.

    When asked if he would vote for Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice for president, Lee scoffed at the notion and ridiculed Rice's comment in an interview that she never experienced any racism while growing up in the South.

    Lee also called for improvements to public education, calling the current system "horrible" and claiming that the wealthy pull their children out and place them in private schools.

    MTSU President Dr. Sidney McPhee announced prior to Lee's remarks that more than 900 people had registered for the diversity conference, which continued today in Nashville.


    -----------------------------...

    Spike Lee derides gangsta rap lyrics in T.O. speech
    March 15, 2005
    CTV.ca (Canadian Press)

    TORONTO - Many black students today are failing in school on purpose because peer pressure via media images has convinced them that smart equals white and that it's cool to become pimps or "video ho's" says pre-eminent African-American filmmaker Spike Lee.

    And Lee told an audience comprised largely of Ontario university students that people can vote with their pocketbooks to convince artists, record companies and media conglomerates like Viacom that the images in today's music videos or lyrics in gangsta rap are unacceptable.

    "As African-Americans we let artists slide," Lee said in the Monday night speech. "(But) those days are over. I think that we have to start to hold people accountable."

    Lee was invited to speak in Toronto by the Ryerson University student administrative council to help mark the International Day For the Elimination of Racial Descrimination on March 21.

    While known for his outspokenness, especially on issues of race, Lee seemed to aim his heavy guns at fellow black artists. He said that while he wasn't calling for a boycott, the father now of a 10-year-old girl said he could no longer listen to the music of R. Kelly because he saw the bootleg video of the rapper with some underage females.

    "These artists talk about 'ho this, bitch this, skank this' and all the other stuff. They're talking about all our mothers, all our sisters. They're talking about their own mothers, grandmothers."

    "You have to have knowledge of self and knowledge of history. Because if you had that you would not use that terminology. You would not even be in that mindset. And we're in a time when young black boys and girls want to be pimps and strippers, because that is what they see. . . . Something is definitely wrong."

    Lee says his grandmother, still alive at 99, saved all her social security cheques to put him through film school and he now feels blessed to be doing what he loves to do.

    Sitting on a stool on the bare stage of Roy Thompson Hall, Lee held his audience rapt as he lit into what he called "gangsta rap craziness" that puts pimps on pedestals. He said parents today who let their children watch TV unsupervised, especially music videos, are guilty of a criminal act.

    "That stuff is not who we really are. We're more regal than that. We have more dignity than that, despite what is sold."

    Lee also stressed that while some black actors like Denzel Washington can now command $20 million a picture, they are still not in the positions of power in Hollywood that the so-called gatekeepers are, the people who decide what pictures get financed.

    "I do believe that when we get in those positions, films like Soul Plane will not be made," he said to laughter and applause.

    Soul Plane was a comedy about a black airline that served fried chicken and had Snoop Dogg as a pot-smoking pilot.

    Lee said that when he was a kid growing up, he wasn't allowed to see Tarzan movies because of their insulting portrayal of Africans, and there was no Aunt Jemima syrup or Uncle Ben's rice products in their kitchen because of their demeaning stereotypes.

    Lee was given a standing ovation at both the beginning and end of his monologue. At one point, the audience was thrilled when fellow filmmaker John Singleton, a Lee protege, joined him onstage.

    Born Shelton Lee in pre-civil rights Atlanta, Ga. in 1957, the director moved at a very young age to Brooklyn, N.Y. His father was a jazz musician and his mother an art teacher who nicknamed him Spike because of his tough nature.

    His first film was issue-oriented - a 10-minute 1980 reworking of the classic but notoriously racist Birth of a Nation. Lee's major breakthrough came with 1986's sex comedy She's Gotta Have It. His landmark film was the race relations-themed Do the Right Thing in 1989.

    Other notable titles include Mo' Better Blues, Jungle Fever and the biographical Malcolm X. He has become a notoriously outspoken show business personality, especially on issues of race in American society. But in 2003 he even indulged in legal action to try and stop the specialty channel Spike TV from infringing on his name. The issue was settled last year with the channel's owners, Viacom.
    (more)
  • Goober ... Trish 2013/01/06 04:21:45
  • Trish Goober ... 2013/01/06 06:30:48 (edited)
    Trish
    a BLACK person with an EDUCATION. That is someone who has an understanding of the connectedness of everything in the world and a sensitivity to the psychological, physical, moral and cultural milieu in which s/he find themselves, showing respect and acting responsibly at all times.
  • Sinister Ken Doll™ 2012/12/29 05:37:20
    Yes
    Sinister Ken Doll™
    +1
    Take a chill pill, Spike. You'll be ok.
  • aherbert 2012/12/29 05:20:22
    No
    aherbert
    I understand his point but Django is a fiction movie ... and as unfortunate and tragic as it maybe ... slavery is a part of America's History ... and what happen to African Americans during that time is just deplorable ... I like Jamie Fox and QT movies ... and plan to view Django; maybe I will have more of an understand as to Spike’s conviction.
  • The Birdman ~ PWCM~JLA 2012/12/29 05:10:35
    No
    The Birdman ~ PWCM~JLA
    +2
    I understand what he means by saying it's disrespectful, I personally don't want to see the movie myself based on the level of nastiness between whites and blacks, and isn't there enough racial divide already today? I think Tarentinos timing is more than a coincidence, and even stinks like a leftist dirty tactic, but my opinion on what Hollywood produces these days creates more of a carbon footprint than the collected feces of the entire world put together in a big pile! It's all crap!!
  • Goober ... The Bir... 2013/01/06 04:22:36
  • The Bir... Goober ... 2013/01/06 11:19:16
    The Birdman ~ PWCM~JLA
    Why, because I think Hollywood is just as much to blame for the way people think and act and am pissed they won't accept responsibility for their actions? They use guns in movies like never before but are so quick to blame guns for what's going on in the country!! They make a movie that raises the level of hate among the population and they call others racists!! They contribute to the liar-in-chief who is behind all the racial tension going on today and get kickbacks from him for being good soldiers to him!! Don't be a dumbass hick! Read before you throw stones idiot!
  • Goober ... The Bir... 2013/01/06 16:08:46
  • The Bir... Goober ... 2013/01/06 19:47:01
    The Birdman ~ PWCM~JLA
    Dude, you need to try to refrain from drugs! It makes you look like you've killed off more brain cells than you can afford! I don't hate 0-stupid because he's black, I hate him because he's a Socialist idiot trying to ruin my country! Go get counseling for your problems, you have no credibility in your opinions when you come off like an idiot! The country doesn't need more racism, it needs to heal it's ills before it can get better!
  • Goober ... The Bir... 2013/01/06 19:52:42
  • The Bir... Goober ... 2013/01/06 19:57:06
    The Birdman ~ PWCM~JLA
    You really are stupid, aren't you? Or are you some kind of sock trying to start trouble....no, you're just plain stupid!
  • Goober ... The Bir... 2013/01/08 04:07:05
  • Pam The Bir... 2013/01/19 17:52:01
    Pam
    Um...how is this movie raising the level of hate in America. And quit using this as a reason to down the President, he has nothing to do with this argument
  • The Bir... Pam 2013/01/19 22:17:42
  • stevmackey 2012/12/29 04:59:20
    Yes
    stevmackey
    get a life
  • Goober ... stevmackey 2013/01/06 04:22:55
  • Jane 2012/12/28 15:06:11
    Yes
    Jane
    Spike Lee needs to get over himself, today's children will not learn this in school and they need to know exactly how our nation was formed. Now if someone would do an honest movie about the taking of the land from the 'natives'.
  • Michael S. 2012/12/28 14:13:16
    Yes
    Michael S.
    He's allowed to feel however he wants, but I think he's being a bit silly about it.
  • Robert 2012/12/27 17:22:12
    No
    Robert
    +2
    No, he's not overreacting. Why, it's his opinion and he has a right to it that's why and he's a grown man. I like the fact that he speaks out and I appreciate how he challenged Clint Eastwood's movie about Iwo Jima. Where do people get off telling others that they don't know how to react to something? Maybe they do when they can't properly challenge him. Spike and Quinton probably know each other. Conscious Blacks of African decent who know their history have problems with Quinton. I've seen a few of his films and overall they're good, but he throws the "N" word loosely, out of context and he does he because he can get away with it. He has no respect for the history of the word and the history of Africans in general and he shows it. He uses the "N" word like he uses violence in ways of sensationalism, for entertainment or as a substitute for good dialogue the ways other dummies use it. You know, like the way people cuss a lot to make up for the lack of a good vocabulary. I also believe Quinton has a special hard on for Blacks too. You never hear him using derogatory slang words for others. For example and with no disrespect, does he throw around the "F" word for homosexual or the "K" word for Jews or the "C" word for whites, etc? And there are quite a few derogatory slang words for Italians which I believe he's a descendant. Have you ever heard any in his film? Much less thrown around like he does the "N" word. He loves that word!
  • andrew.... Robert 2012/12/27 18:00:23
    andrew.micheals.353
    +1
    I believe your right in as much as you say Quentin over uses the N word, it has made me cringe in the cinema, however I disagree with you on Spike lee. First and most important he said he is not going to talk about a film he is not going to watch. Then he criticises the film that he has not even seen. Where is the logic in that? It has been a while since I saw anything by spike lee that I actually enjoyed I think he should concentrate on what he does best.
  • Robert andrew.... 2012/12/27 22:34:05
    Robert
    Yea, I had a problem with his criticism without watching the film. BUT, as I said at the top, these two probably have a relationship and Spike's view of Quinton is probably not new. No doubt he has criticized Quinton's use of said word before, this movie's setting is American Slavery, and I doubt very seriously if Quinton has scripted said word contextually because he has no history of doing so. This my reason for writing what I did about Spike. Spike knows Quinton's work and knows how Quinton uses the "N" word. Anytime some Blacks are in his movie the "N" word is thrown around. Spike doesn't have to see THIS move to know. He can go on Quinton's past history! And Once again, you are playing Spike's manager now? You are telling him, an American just like I suppose you are, what he can and cannot comment on? You think he should concentrate on what HE does best? I'll bet you wouldn't like it if Spike started telling you what you should do.
  • andrew.... Robert 2012/12/27 23:42:46 (edited)
    andrew.micheals.353
    I am not spike lees manager obviously. If I was I would tell him to shut up. No I would not like him to tell me what to do but so what? I am not in the public eye. Whatever I do and say is unlikely to have any impact on a significant number of people. Unfortunately he is in an influential position. The price of fame is subjection to public opinion and this is my 2 cents worth.

    Spike lee is very talented and I believe his opinions and attitude make his films a lot better however the last film he was involved in that I actually enjoyed was 'inside man' which was 6 years ago. That is very poor. Jamie Fox is also very talented and I would hope his hard work and contribution to the movie are not damaged or undermined by Spike Lees misguided comments. I will be going to see the film regardless of what Spike lee says. He was not the only person whose ancestors were slaves. I suspect Jamie has a lot to say in support of Quinton and the movie and I am not going to judge the film until I have seen it.
  • Robert andrew.... 2012/12/28 16:29:27
    Robert
    I happened to like the Inside Man myself, so there you are. What was misguided about his comments? The man's name is Spike, obvious you haven't caught on. You'd tell him to shut up and he'd fire you!
  • andrew.... Robert 2012/12/28 16:37:27
    andrew.micheals.353
    Someone needs to tell him to shut up. If I was fired, I could kick his ass. Sounds like a good deal.
  • Robert andrew.... 2012/12/31 16:10:59
    Robert
    Yea sure, you'll kick his ass! Your dad never told you to use your head for more than a hat rack didn't he? Don't worry, everyone makes mistakes and your's was a knee jerk reaction. But you ought to think about your responses first because this time I can tell you didn't! Why? First you'd have to first kick his body guard's asses or they might even shoot you, or they might have you arrested for assault. Now, having considered your realistic options instead of that bullshyte you just wrote, I bet you want to retract your statement don't you?
  • andrew.... Robert 2012/12/31 17:45:29
    andrew.micheals.353
    Lol, absolutely not! Listen, as we are being hypothetical, if I was his manager I would call him to a private dinner at my home. He would not need to bring his body guards in fact I would insist they do not come because I would not be feeding them. After dinner we would discuss the matter like adults and I would tell him to shut up. Now if as you say he did not take my advice then I would kick his ass right out of my house. Now all that crap you said about knee jerk reaction and apologize is just nonsense. I am right and retract nothing.
  • Robert andrew.... 2012/12/31 20:56:25
    Robert
    Yea sure you would, you would throw him out of your house. LOL! By the way, there is an interesting article on Alternet.org http://www.alternet.org/cultu...
  • andrew.... Robert 2013/01/02 07:03:31
    andrew.micheals.353
    Interesting article. I agree in a sense I do not want to watch a film and feel uncomfortable about race relations. I also think that if the film upsets extremists black or white then it is probably a good film. The only problem I have with the article is that it talks about America. I do not live in America and I do not believe the rest of the world is obsessed with race the way American are so I do not think that the colour of the director really matter the question is going to be is it a good film. You may see each other as black and white but to everyone outside of your country you are all Americans.
  • Robert andrew.... 2013/01/02 18:00:24
    Robert
    I can dig it. Race is huge here, everything is based on it. Now I can see why said you would tell Spike to shut up, which I though was funny, even though several have said the same. It's funny to me because Spike has a right to his opinion and I suppose in your country, where ever that is, people don't have a right to their opinion. A lot of Americans feel the same, that is unless you support their opinion. But you have a problem with an American film that's about America? Whew, that's quite revealing!
  • andrew.... Robert 2013/01/03 14:03:00
    andrew.micheals.353
    I was with you until you said I had a problem with an American film? I don't have a problem with an American film that is why I am going to watch django and not listen to Spike lee who has a problem with an American film. You do have the right to your own opinion as does spike lee however when you are trying to sell a product you always have to be diplomatic with your responses and as spikes manager I would want to get paid as well so I am not going to give him any advice that could lose money for our enterprise. BTW I am English. Things are not perfect here but I have friends from all races who I grew up with and I think we get along fine and we are able to discuss issues openly.
  • Robert andrew.... 2013/01/03 18:32:13
    Robert
    You're confusing me then because you said the only problem you had with the article is that it talks about America, as opposed to what should the article been about? You have a problem with an article that talks about America that deals with American issues raised up in American film and in the American film industry? Maybe I should have asked you what problems do you have? But as I wrote, I can kind of understand you because you're not an American. I listened to a great review of the movie yesterday by someone who is an African American, but saw it with a majority white audience to see how they would react amongst themselves without realizing that blacks are in the audience with them. I will not report on his review here because I'm not a spoiler. Well friend, I don't know what to say other than enjoy the film I hear it's good.
  • andrew.... Robert 2013/01/03 22:20:40
    andrew.micheals.353
    I understand what you are saying. Let me try to be a little clearer. When the article talks about race relations as most Americans do they talk about black and white people as though the only black and white people in the world live in America. Most of what goes on in America is completely alien to the rest of the world so when i read an article with a generalisation about black or white people I tend to have a problem with it because I know they are really only talking about America and not the rest of the world where the majority of black and white people live. So when the article says that studios do not believe white audiences will turn up to see a black directors film I believe that might be true of white people in America but not the rest of the world. Hence I have enjoyed spike lee, bill duke or a john singleton movie.
  • Robert andrew.... 2013/01/04 16:36:50
    Robert
    That's what I though you meant. Thanks clarifying your position and you’re right the article did not consider the international audience and if he did it would have done lot to help others understand what’s going on here. There is a lot going on behind the scenes of that movie and its development. Briefly, Quinton Tarantino is one of those; pardon the expression, White Hipsters around the Hollywood scene, like Bill Marr. You know, he's cool with Blacks or think he is, but to Whites he's still white. You understand? In other words, he’s not viewed is a “N” lover. The type that says he has Black friends, I have or had a Black girlfriend that sort of thing. But at the same time when his so called Black friends are around, say his family and/or his other friends at a social gathering and they start cracking on his Black friend making him or her butt of their jokes or asking stuff like “is it true that you people, etc.” the Quinton types won’t stand up for them. He might remove his friend from the situation but usually after he’s had enough but he won’t stand up for them. While he’s enjoying his friend’s concerns, he’ll enstead tell is Black friend, oh don’t pay them any mind they’re just joking, just ignore them, etc. You’ve got to have thicker skin, you’re so sensitive etc....
    That's what I though you meant. Thanks clarifying your position and you’re right the article did not consider the international audience and if he did it would have done lot to help others understand what’s going on here. There is a lot going on behind the scenes of that movie and its development. Briefly, Quinton Tarantino is one of those; pardon the expression, White Hipsters around the Hollywood scene, like Bill Marr. You know, he's cool with Blacks or think he is, but to Whites he's still white. You understand? In other words, he’s not viewed is a “N” lover. The type that says he has Black friends, I have or had a Black girlfriend that sort of thing. But at the same time when his so called Black friends are around, say his family and/or his other friends at a social gathering and they start cracking on his Black friend making him or her butt of their jokes or asking stuff like “is it true that you people, etc.” the Quinton types won’t stand up for them. He might remove his friend from the situation but usually after he’s had enough but he won’t stand up for them. While he’s enjoying his friend’s concerns, he’ll enstead tell is Black friend, oh don’t pay them any mind they’re just joking, just ignore them, etc. You’ve got to have thicker skin, you’re so sensitive etc. snicker, snicker. Another thing about his type is they claim they love Black women but not in the respectful type but the whorish types for freaky she’s subservient to me type love. It’s an open secret around Hollywood that Quinton and his pals like these types of women. Not respectable ones with careers that are about service to the community or ones that you have to look up to, but they like whorish black women. Not cheap skeezer type hos but call girl types. Bill Marr dated a stripper who called herself Super Head, you see and I’m not talking about he banged her every now and then with the rest of the guys on the swinging scene I’m talking about he dated her. But if that’s what they like then that’s what they like, but they can’t front off something else like they try to do. Check out the role Pam Grier played in Foxy Brown. The white guy was her hero and the black guy was totally degenerate. And I believe she’s had the only black female role in his files until Django. Notice Sam Jackson’s roles in Quinton’s films. Bad dude, but degenerate and in Django he’s an house kneegrow Uncle Tom. Pulp Fiction, exciting movie, but look at how totally degrading the black men were. Sam’s character was a killer, Ving Rhames’ was a hustler who got raped and I mean he was raped hard too with oo, oo, oo and hoopin’ and hollerin’, etc. Bad dude hustlers usually have posies but yet he got isolated and raped. Bad dude hustler but too dumb to know where the bad white dudes were. He got revenge but that isn’t the point because one was a Nazi type and the other was some kind of a monster. That’s openly secretly Quinton’s desires. Bruce Willis’ character could have been the one who got raped but you knew as soon as the scene started it had to be Ving’s because he was the Bad “N”. Notice how the scene at the apartment the white guy stood up and tried to kill Sam and John’s characters but the black guy was like hiding, that’s them I’m not in this. Then the black guy was kind of sassy, ya’ll didn’t kill me huh and John’s character just carelessly blows his head off. Then Quinton just calls the dead man the “N” this and the “N” that. He just went on and on. Get that dead “N” outta here my girl’s coming home soon. It was like he was trying to get it all in as much as possible so that his boys can get their kicks watching him. This is Quinton’s disposition towards African Americans and this movie Django is no different. Now, having told you this you’d probably enjoy this movie won’t you. Just kidding.
    (more)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 11 Next » Last »

See Votes by State

The map above displays the winning answer by region.

Entertainment

2014/04/25 08:04:13

Hot Questions on SodaHead
More Hot Questions

More Community More Originals